Poll: Majority of voters think Democrats have no leader

By Rob Smith, Buzz60

A majority of registered voters think the Democratic party has no clear leader!

That's what 40% of people surveyed in a new Harvard Harris Poll thought.

15% named former President Obama as the party's leader, and 12% named Bernie Sanders - even though Senator Sanders is a registered Independent.

See how Democratic women wore white for Trump's address

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Democratic women wear white to Trump's address
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Democratic women wear white to Trump's address

Rep. Frank Pallone, D-N.J., takes a group photo of women Democrats wearing all white for President Donald Trump's address to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democratic women wear white as President Donald J. Trump delivers his first address before a joint session of Congress on Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017, at the US Capitol in Washington, DC.

(Photo by Melina Mara /The Washington Post via Getty Images)

U.S. President Donald Trump addresses Joint Session of Congress - Washington, U.S. - 28/02/17 - Democratic female members of the House of Representatives talk before U.S. President Donald Trump addresses the U.S. Congress.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Members of the Democratic party listen as U.S. President Donald Trump, not pictured, during a joint session of Congress in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017. Trump will press Congress to carry out his priorities for replacing Obamacare, jump-starting the economy and bolstering the nation's defenses in an address eagerly awaited by lawmakers, investors and the public who want greater clarity on his policy agenda.

(Aaron P. Bernstein/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

U.S. President Donald Trump addresses Joint Session of Congress - Washington, U.S. - 28/02/17 - Female Democratic members of the House of Representatives.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

U.S. President Donald Trump addresses Joint Session of Congress - Washington, U.S. - 28/02/17 - Democratic women in white listen as U.S. President Donald Trump addresses the U.S. Congress.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

Democratic women wear white ahead of President Donald J. Trumps first address before a joint session of Congress on Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017, at the US Capitol in Washington, DC.

(Photo by Melina Mara /The Washington Post via Getty Images)

U.S. President Donald Trump addresses Joint Session of Congress - Washington, U.S. - 28/02/17 - Republicans applaud as U.S. President Donald Trump addresses the U.S. Congress.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

Center row from left, Reps. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn., and Ben Ray Luj�, D-N.M., listen to President Donald Trump address a joint session of Congress in the Capitol's House Chamber, February 28, 2017.

 (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

U.S. President Donald Trump addresses Joint Session of Congress - Washington, U.S. - 28/02/17 - U.S. President Donald Trump addresses the U.S. Congress.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

Reps. Nanette Barragan, D-Calif., center, Jackie Speier, D-Calif., right, and other women members appear in white in the House chamber to show support for women's rights, before President Donald Trump addressed a joint session of Congress in the Capitol, February 28, 2017.

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

U.S. President Donald Trump addresses Joint Session of Congress - Washington, U.S. - 28/02/17 - U.S. President Donald Trump arrives.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

Members of congress wear white to honor the women's suffrage movement and support women's rights as U.S. President Donald Trump addresses a joint session of the U.S. Congress on February 28, 2017 in the House chamber of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC. Trump's first address to Congress focused on national security, tax and regulatory reform, the economy, and healthcare.

(Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

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11% think Senator Elizabeth Warren is the party's leader, and not far behind with 10% of the vote is former secretary of State and 2016 presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

However, voters may be in the mood for something new by 2020.

45% wanted to see someone not on the survey's list of potential 2020 candidates, which also included Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Mark Cuban, and Oprah Winfrey.

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