'Why are you scared of diversity in the news?': German reporter confronts Trump with pointed question on media

A German reporter asked President Donald Trump on Friday why he is so "scared of diversity in the news," referencing the president's repeated attempts to delegitimize well-established media organizations by referring to them as "fake news."

"Mr. President, 'America First' — don't you think this is going to weaken the European Union," the reporter first asked, referring to Trump's campaign-trail slogan.

She then added: "And why are you scared of diversity in the news and in the media? That you speak so often of fake news."

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U.S. President Donald Trump acknowledges members of his cabinet, including Chief of Staff Reince Priebus (from 4th R), Senior Advisor Steve Bannon, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and Vice President Mike Pence, as they arrive to meet with Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel (L) in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, U.S. March 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump and Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel wait for reporters to enter the room before their meeting in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, U.S. March 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump and Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel watch as reporters enter the room before their meeting in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, U.S. March 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump meets with Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, U.S. March 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Donald Trump, speaks while Angela Merkel, Germany's chancellor, left, listens during a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, March 17, 2017. Merkel, who is running for a fourth term in Germanys election in September, plans to explain her view of the mutual advantages of free trade during her talks with Trump on Friday, according to German officials. Photographers: Pat Benic/Pool via Bloomberg
US President Donald Trump and German Chancellor Angela Merkel hold a joint press conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC, on March 17, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump and German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrive to speak at a joint news conference at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
US President Donald Trump and German Chancellor Angela Merkel hold a joint press conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC, on March 17, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump and Angela Merkel, Germany's chancellor, smile for photographs as she arrives to the West Wing of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, March 17, 2017. Trumps first meeting with Merkel will test the power dynamic between the Wests two pre-eminent leaders, one struggling for credibility on the world stage while the other fights for political survival at home. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
U.S. President Donald Trump welcomes German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
U.S. President Donald Trump welcomes German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
U.S. President Donald Trump welcomes German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
U.S. President Donald Trump escorts German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
U.S. President Donald Trump greets German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
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Trump took issue with the first prong of the reporter's question, insisting he is in favor of free trade.

"I'm not an isolationist, I'm a free trader," he said. "But I'm also a fair trader. And our free trade has led to a lot of bad things happening."

The president concluded his remarks suggesting the reporter had been reading "fake news" herself.

"I am not an isolationist by any stretch of the imagination," Trump said. "So I don't know what newspaper you're reading, but I guess that would be another example, as you say, of 'fake news.'"

The comments came during a brief joint-press conference with German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

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