These anonymous activists are starting a campaign to mass-unfollow Donald Trump on Twitter



President Donald Trump appears to feel pretty comfortable on Twitter, where he speaks unfiltered to a platform of millions. But this group of anonymous activists has plans to fight Trump by hitting him where it hurts — his follower count.

Block the Bully, which launched Thursday, allows users to plug in their Twitter account and it, with one click, automatically unfollow President Trump's @RealDonaldTrump handle for them and block his account. And if users don't already follow Trump, it will follow and then unfollow him so he still gets the notification.

These anonymous activists are starting a campaign to mass-unfollow Donald Trump on Twitter
Block the Bully
Source: Block The Bully

"Trump is using Twitter as his bully pulpit, and I think everybody knows that," one of the project's leaders saidin a phone call on Wednesday, speaking on condition of anonymity. "We realized that this is Trump's own, direct-to-consumer channel that he feels empowered by, that he controls."

So the goal, the organizer said, was to launch an "agitation campaign" against Trump by targeting his Twitter following.

"We know what a thin skin he has, that he reacts to everything," the organizer said. "If we could get a vast number of people to unfollow, and even block him, in the channel that he values the most ... I think it sends a very strong statement."

These anonymous activists are starting a campaign to mass-unfollow Donald Trump on Twitter
A screenshot from the Block the Bully site.
Source: Block the Bully

The organizer said the Block the Bully campaign's official Twitter account will share regular updates to Trump's follower count, which they hope will begin to trend downward.

The team behind the campaign is a small group of activists who work in tech and entertainment. They're identifying themselves on the project only as "The Resistance."

The weeks and months since Trump's presidential victory in November have seen massive protests across the country, from the Women's March on Washington and its sister marches around the world to town hall meetings packed with constituents who are concerned about Trump's policies.

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Women's Marches around the United States
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Women's Marches around the United States

Protesters march down Pennsylvania avenue during the Women's March on Washington January 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. The march is expected to draw thousands from across the country to protest newly inaugurated President Donald Trump.

(Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)

Demonstrators hold signs while making their way towards Trump Tower during the Women's March in New York, U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017. Hundreds of demonstrations around the world are planned in conjunction with the Womens March on Washington, which is expected to be the largest inauguration-related demonstration in United States history. Photographer: Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Protesters flood 14th Street during the Women's March on Washington January 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. Large crowds are attending the anti-Trump rally a day after U.S. President Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th U.S. president.

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, center left, and Boston Mayor Martin Walsh hold a banner while marching down Commonwealth Avenue during the Boston Women's March in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017. Hundreds of demonstrations around the world are planned in conjunction with the Women's March on Washington, which is expected to be the largest inauguration-related demonstration in United States history.

(Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Demonstrators attend the rally at the Women's March on Washington on January 21, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(Photo by Kevin Mazur/WireImage)

Demonstrators gather during the Women's March of Los Angeles in Los Angeles, California, U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017. Hundreds of demonstrations around the world are planned in conjunction with the Women's March on Washington, which is expected to be the largest inauguration-related demonstration in United States history.

(Troy Harvey/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Marchers fill Hill Street during the Women's March on January 21, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. Tens of thousands of people took to the streets of Downtown Los Angeles for the Women's March in protest after the inauguration of President Donald Trump. Women's Marches are being held in cities around the world.

(Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Demonstrators hold signs during the Women's March of Los Angeles in Los Angeles, California, U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017. Hundreds of demonstrations around the world are planned in conjunction with the Women's March on Washington, which is expected to be the largest inauguration-related demonstration in United States history.

(Troy Harvey/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Peaceful protesters demonstrate during the Women's March On Washington on January 21, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images)

Marianne Nepsund, 29, from New York, holds a sign as she participates in the Women's March on Washington, following the inauguration of U.S. President Donald Trump, in Washington, D.C., U.S., January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Demonstrators taking part in the Women's March to protest Donald Trump's inauguration as the 45th president of the United States march around the U.S. Agriculture Department in Washington, January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Marchers during the Women's March on Main Street Park City on January 21, 2017 in Park City, Utah.

(Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images)

Marchers during the Women's March on Main Street Park City on January 21, 2017 in Park City, Utah.

(Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images)

Protesters cheer at the Women's March on January 21, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois. Thousands of demonstrators took to the streets in protest after the inauguration of President Donald Trump.

(Photo by Dakota Sillyman/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Protesters participate in the Women's March on January 21, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois. Thousands of demonstrators took to the streets in protest after the inauguration of President Donald Trump.

(Photo by John Gress/Getty Images)

Hundreds of thousands of marchers fill the street during a Women's March demonstration in Washington, DC, U.S., January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Protesters participate in the Women's March on January 21, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois. Thousands of demonstrators took to the streets in protest after the inauguration of President Donald Trump.

(Photo by John Gress/Getty Images)

People listen to speeches at the Women's March, held in opposition to the agenda and rhetoric of President Donald Trump in Washington, DC, U.S., January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Canice Leung
People participate in a Women's March to protest against U.S. President Donald Trump in New York City, U.S. January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 21: A view of protesters marching in front of the Trump International Hotel Washington, D.C. on Pennsylvania Avenue during the Women's March on Washington on January 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Noam Galai/WireImage)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 21: A view of protesters marching on Pennsylvania Avenue during the Women's March on Washington on January 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Noam Galai/WireImage)
MIAMI, FL - JANUARY 21: Demonstrators attend the rally at the Women's March at Bayfront Park Amphitheater on January 21, 2017 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Sergi Alexander/Getty Images)
Demonstrators take part in the Women's March to protest Donald Trump's inauguration as the 45th president of the United States near the U.S. Capitol in Washington, January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
People pack the National Mall for the Women's March in Washington, U.S. January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
People gather for the Women's March in Washington U.S., January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A sculpted eagle on the exterior of Grand Central Terminal overlooks people participating in a Women's March to protest against U.S. President Donald Trump in New York City, U.S. January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
People participate in a Women's March to protest against U.S. President Donald Trump in New York City, U.S. January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
People participating in a Women's March to protest against U.S. President Donald Trump fill up 42nd St. in New York City, U.S. January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
People watch as demonstrators march towards Trump Tower during the Women's March in New York, U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017. Hundreds of demonstrations around the world are planned in conjunction with the Womens March on Washington, which is expected to be the largest inauguration-related demonstration in United States history. Photographer: Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images
DENVER, CO JANUARY 21: Tens of thousands of people from across Colorado flooded Civic Center in downtown Denver for the 'Womens March on Denver the day after the inauguration of President Donald Trump. January 21, 2017 Denver, CO. (Photo By Joe Amon/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
DENVER, CO - January 21: Thousands of protesters at Civic Center Park for the Women's March on Denver January 21, 2017. Over 100,000 people converged on downtown Denver in coordination with demonstrations across the country to send a message to the new Trump administration demanding social justice, human rights, and equality. (Photo by Andy Cross/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
Demonstrators gather at Civic Center Park in Denver, Colorado, during the Women's March on January 21, 2017. Hundreds of thousands of people packed the streets across the US on Saturday in a massive outpouring of defiant opposition to America's new president, Donald Trump. / AFP / Jason Connolly (Photo credit should read JASON CONNOLLY/AFP/Getty Images)
A man protests during a Central Florida women's rally at Lake Eola Park in Orlando, Fla., on Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017. (Stephen M. Dowell/Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)
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But can a digital campaign carry as much weight as boots-on-the-ground activism? The organizer behind the "Block the Bully" campaign seems to think so.

"We know what a thin skin he has, that he reacts to everything."

Digital activism is "incredibly important," the project's organizer said, adding that the team is hopeful that this project will inspire other activists to use the digital space to create new methods for political change. Future projects could include robo-calling elected officials, the organizer said, or creating new systems to keep fake news from spreading online.

"This is our small little effort to inspire folks, and if we can piss Donald Trump off while doing it, that's a win-win," the project's organizer said. "Even if it doesn't change the world, every act, every little energy that you put out there, in aggregate, will."

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