Stolen Stradivarius violin makes its historic comeback

By Jose Sepulveda, Buzz60

A priceless piece of music history has come back to life.

A Stradivarius that was stolen and missing for almost 4 decades returns to the stage in New York.

It was created in 1734 by Antonio Stradivari, that alone would make it one of only about 550 Stradivarius instruments left in the world.

See more on the stolen violin:

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Roman Totenberg's stolen Stradivarius violin
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Roman Totenberg's stolen Stradivarius violin

The Ames Stradivarius violin, that was stolen in 1980 from the late virtuoso violinist Roman Totenberg, is seen in the borough of Manhattan in New York, U.S., March 13, 2017.

(REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton)

Violinist Mira Wang plays the Ames Stradivarius violin, that was stolen in 1980 from the late virtuoso violinist Roman Totenberg, in the borough of Manhattan in New York, U.S., March 13, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton)

The Ames Stradivarius violin, that was stolen in 1980 from the late virtuoso violinist Roman Totenberg, is seen in the borough of Manhattan in New York, U.S., March 13, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton)

Violinist Mira Wang plays the Ames Stradivarius violin, that was stolen in 1980 from the late virtuoso violinist Roman Totenberg, in the borough of Manhattan in New York, U.S., March 13, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton)

Violinist Mira Wang holds the Ames Stradivarius violin, that was stolen in 1980 from the late virtuoso violinist Roman Totenberg, in the borough of Manhattan in New York, U.S., March 13, 2017.

(REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton)

The Ames Stradivarius violin, that was stolen in 1980 from the late virtuoso violinist Roman Totenberg, is seen in the borough of Manhattan in New York, U.S., March 13, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton)

Phillip Injeian, a master violin maker, points to specific points on the Ames Stradivarius violin during a news conference in New York August 6, 2015. U.S. authorities said Thursday they plan to announce the recovery of a rare Stradivarius violin that was stolen in 1980 from the late virtuoso violinist Roman Totenberg after a performance. A spokeswoman for Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara confirmed that authorities would hold a ceremony to turn the violin over to Totenberg's family after the FBI recovered it in June. 

(REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton)

The Ames Stradivarius violin is seen during a news conference as Preet Bharara, the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, speaks in New York, August 6, 2015. U.S. authorities said Thursday they plan to announce the recovery of a rare Stradivarius violin that was stolen in 1980 from the late virtuoso violinist Roman Totenberg after a performance. A spokeswoman for Bharara confirmed that authorities would hold a ceremony to turn the violin over to Totenberg's family after the FBI recovered it in June. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

The Ames Stradivarius violin is placed for viewing during a news conference in New York August 6, 2015. U.S. authorities said Thursday they plan to announce the recovery of a rare Stradivarius violin that was stolen in 1980 from the late virtuoso violinist Roman Totenberg after a performance. A spokeswoman for Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara confirmed that authorities would hold a ceremony to turn the violin over to Totenberg's family after the FBI recovered it in June. 

(REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton)

Phillip Injeian, a master violin maker, points to specific points on the Ames Stradivarius violin during a news conference in New York August 6, 2015. U.S. authorities said Thursday they plan to announce the recovery of a rare Stradivarius violin that was stolen in 1980 from the late virtuoso violinist Roman Totenberg after a performance. A spokeswoman for Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara confirmed that authorities would hold a ceremony to turn the violin over to Totenberg's family after the FBI recovered it in June. 

(REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton)

The Ames Stradivarius violin is placed for viewing during a news conference in New York August 6, 2015. U.S. authorities said Thursday they plan to announce the recovery of a rare Stradivarius violin that was stolen in 1980 from the late virtuoso violinist Roman Totenberg after a performance. A spokeswoman for Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara confirmed that authorities would hold a ceremony to turn the violin over to Totenberg's family after the FBI recovered it in June. 

(REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton)

The Ames Stradivarius violin is seen in an undated handout picture released by the FBI. U.S. authorities said Thursday they plan to announce the recovery of the Ames Stradivarius that was stolen in 1980 from the late virtuoso violinist Roman Totenberg after a performance. The violin was stolen in 1980 after Roman Totenberg, then director of the Longy School of Music in Cambridge, Massachusetts, delivered a performance at the school.

(REUTERS/FBI/Handout)

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But it's story took a twist 37 years ago when it was stolen from the dressing room of virtuoso Roman Totenberg.

After the long search, it turned up in 2015.

After extensive restoration, the "Ames" Stradivarius is making its musical comeback with former Totenberg student, Mira Wang getting the honor of playing it. Wang couldn't be prouder.

"It means a great deal to me that I can use the violin, to be the first one who would bring it to the public. I often think of Roman and think about, he's looking at me from above."

A similar Strad, this one made in 1721, was sold at auction in England for over $16M in 2011.

The Totenberg family is still trying to decide what they'll do with the instrument... but you can bet they are keeping a close eye on it.

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