Trump to drop climate change from environmental reviews


March 14 (Reuters) - President Donald Trump is set to sign an order to greatly reduce the role climate change plays in decision making across the U.S. government, Bloomberg reported, citing a person familiar with the administration's plan.

The order, which could be signed this week, aims to reverse former Democratic President Barack Obama's broad approach for addressing climate change, the report said.

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The directive will urge the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to undo the Clean Power Plan, the Bloomberg report said.

The Clean Power Plan is Obama's centerpiece initiative to combat climate change, requiring states to slash emissions of carbon dioxide, but it was never implemented due to legal challenges launched by several Republican states.

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Director of Environmental Protection Agency Scott Pruitt
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Director of Environmental Protection Agency Scott Pruitt

Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), speaks to employees of the Agency in Washington, U.S., February 21, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), greets employees of the agency in Washington, U.S., February 21, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Director of Environmental Protection Agency Scott Pruitt is sworn in by Justice Samuel Alito as his wife Marilyn holds a bible during ceremony at the Executive Office in Washington, U.S., February 17, 2017.

(REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), greets employees of the agency in Washington, U.S., February 21, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, U.S. President-elect Donald Trump's pick as head of the Environmental Protectional Agency, meets with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., January 6, 2017.

(REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt testifies before a Senate Environment and Public Works Committee confirmation hearing on his nomination to be administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency in Washington, U.S., January 18, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt (R), U.S. President-elect Donald Trump's pick to lead the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), meets with Senator Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV) (L) in her office on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. January 4, 2017.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, U.S. President-elect Donald Trump's pick as head of the Environmental Protectional Agency, meets with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., January 6, 2017.

(REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

Oklahoma Farm Bureau Vice President of Public Policy John R.H. Collison (L) meets with Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt (R) to discuss state water issues at the attorney generals office in Oklahoma City, July 29, 2014.

(REUTERS/Nick Oxford)

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt in a meeting at his office in Oklahoma City, July 29, 2014. 

(REUTERS/Nick Oxford)

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According to the report, the measure would direct U.S. regulators to rescind Obama-era regulations limiting oil industry emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

The order will also involve a reconsideration of the government's use of a metric known as the "social cost of carbon," which weighs the potential economic damage from climate change, Bloomberg reported on Tuesday.

Trump has long signaled his intention to reverse Obama's climate-change initiatives, but the Republican president has vowed his planned overhaul of green regulation would not jeopardize America's water and air quality.

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President Barack Obama at Yosemite National Park
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President Barack Obama at Yosemite National Park
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Park Service at Yosemite National Park, California, U.S., June 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts 
Secret Service agents keep watch as U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Park Service at Yosemite National Park, California, U.S., June 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Park Service at Yosemite National Park, California, U.S., June 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Park Service at Yosemite National Park, California, U.S., June 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Park Service at Yosemite National Park, California, U.S., June 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Park Service at Yosemite National Park, California, U.S., June 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Barack Obama waves after speaking about the National Park Service at Yosemite National Park, California, U.S., June 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Barack Obama walks after speaking about the National Park Service at Yosemite National Park, California, U.S., June 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Park Service at Yosemite National Park, California, U.S., June 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the National Park Service at Yosemite National Park, California, U.S., June 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Barack Obama is helped to his feet during an "Every Kid in a Park" event with children at Yosemite National Park, California, U.S., June 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Barack Obama and U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama take part in "Every Kid in a Park" with children at Yosemite National Park, California, U.S., June 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Barack Obama and U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama take part in "Every Kid in a Park" with children at Yosemite National Park, California, U.S., June 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Barack Obama and U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama take part in "Every Kid in a Park" with children at Yosemite National Park, California, U.S., June 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Barack Obama is helped up by children as U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama watches during an "Every Kid in a Park" event at Yosemite National Park, California, U.S., June 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Barack Obama and U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama take part in an "Every Kid in a Park" event with children at Yosemite National Park, California, U.S., June 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Barack Obama is helped up by children as U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama watches during an "Every Kid in a Park" event at Yosemite National Park, California, U.S., June 18, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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Reuters reported earlier this month that the White House had proposed to slash a quarter of the EPA's budget, targeting climate-change programs and those designed to prevent air and water pollution like lead contamination.

The Bloomberg report said that some of the changes could happen immediately, while others could take years to implement. (Reporting by Ankit Ajmera in Bengaluru; Editing by Maju Samuel)

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