Brazil President Michel Temer leaves residence due to 'ghosts'

By Susana Victoria Perez, Buzz60

Brazil's president has left the official residence that traditionally houses the country's top politician. It appears he moved out due to a fear of ghosts.

Michel Temer and his wife, first lady Marcela Temer, moved out of the Alvorada Palace in Brasilia because they felt bad vibes since the moment they moved in. According to Veja, a Brazilian news weekly, the president said the energy wasn't good there and he had trouble sleeping.

Temer has moved out of the glass-fronted Alvorada and returned to the nearby Jaburu Palace, where he resided when he served as vice president under Dilma Rousseff. Temer's move comes during a very tense political climate in Brazil and just months after the country removed Rousseff from office following her impeachment.

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Brazil impeachment -- demonstrations and protests
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Brazil impeachment -- demonstrations and protests
RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - APRIL 17: Pro-impeachment supporters watch a live television broadcast as lower house deputies cast their votes in the impeachment process of President Dilma Rousseff on April 17, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. President Rousseff is facing a crucial impeachment vote in the lower house of Congress today. Rio will host the Rio 2016 Olympic Games in August. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Brazilians in favor of the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff react while watching the televised voting of the Lower House of Congress over her impeachment in Brasilia, Brazil April 17, 2016. REUTERS/Adriano Machado TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
SAO PAULO, BRAZIL - APRIL 17: Giant balloons depicting President of Brazil Dilma Rousseff and former President of Brazil Inacio Lula Da Silva are displayed by protesters in favor of impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff on April 17, 2016 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The Lower House of Congress will hold a vote on whether to impeach Rousseff over charges of manipulating government accounts for political gains. (Photo by Cris Faga/LatinContent/Getty Images)
SAO PAULO, BRAZIL - APRIL 17: Protesters in favor of impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff protest in the streets on April 17, 2016 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The Lower House of Congress will hold a vote on whether to impeach Rousseff over charges of manipulating government accounts for political gains. (Photo by Cris Faga/LatinContent/Getty Images)
Brazilians in favor of the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff react while watching the televised voting of the Lower House of Congress over her impeachment in Brasilia, Brazil April 17, 2016. REUTERS/Adriano Machado
Brazilians in favor of the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff react while watching the televised voting of the Lower House of Congress over her impeachment in Brasilia, Brazil April 17, 2016. REUTERS/Adriano Machado
SAO PAULO, BRAZIL - APRIL 17: Protesters in favor of impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff protest in the streets April 17, 2016 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The Lower House of Congress will hold a vote on whether to impeach Rousseff over charges of manipulating government accounts for political gains. (Photo by Victor Moriyama/Getty Images)
Brazilians in favor of the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff react while watching the televised voting of the Lower House of Congress over her impeachment in Brasilia, Brazil April 17, 2016. REUTERS/Adriano Machado
A supporter of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff follows on big screens in Sao Paulo, the voting of lawmakers at the Congress in Brasilia on whether the impeachment of Rousseff will move forward, on April 17, 2016. The voting followed a raucous debate that transfixed the deeply divided nation. The opposition needs a total of 342 out of the 513 deputies in the lower house of Congress to authorize the trial. Rousseff, whose approval rating has plunged to a dismal 10 percent, faces charges of embellishing public accounts to mask the budget deficit during her 2014 reelection. / AFP / Miguel Schincariol (Photo credit should read MIGUEL SCHINCARIOL/AFP/Getty Images)
Supporters of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff follow on big screens in Sao Paulo, the voting of lawmakers at the Congress in Brasilia on whether the impeachment of Rousseff will move forward, on April 17, 2016. The voting followed a raucous debate that transfixed the deeply divided nation. The opposition needs a total of 342 out of the 513 deputies in the lower house of Congress to authorize the trial. Rousseff, whose approval rating has plunged to a dismal 10 percent, faces charges of embellishing public accounts to mask the budget deficit during her 2014 reelection. / AFP / Miguel Schincariol (Photo credit should read MIGUEL SCHINCARIOL/AFP/Getty Images)
SAO PAULO, BRAZIL - APRIL 17: Protesters opposed to the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff protest in the streets April 17, 2016 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The Lower House of Congress will hold a vote on whether to impeach Rousseff over charges of manipulating government accounts for political gains. (Photo by Victor Moriyama/Getty Images)
Brazilians in favor of the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff react while watching the televised voting of the Lower House of Congress over her impeachment in Brasilia, Brazil April 17, 2016. REUTERS/Adriano Machado
Brazilians in favor of the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff watch the televised voting of the Lower House of Congress over her impeachment in Brasilia, Brazil April 17, 2016. REUTERS/Adriano Machado
Activists supporting the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff take part in a demonstration in Sao Paulo Brazil on April 17 2016. Brazilian lawmakers voted Sunday on whether President Dilma Rousseff should face impeachment trial in a tense, at times circus-like showdown watched live by millions around the deeply divided country. / AFP / NELSON ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - APRIL 17: Pro-impeachment supporters watch a live television broadcast before lower house deputies cast their votes in the impeachment process of President Dilma Rousseff on April 17, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. President Rousseff is facing a crucial impeachment vote in the lower house of Congress today. Rio will host the Rio 2016 Olympic Games in August. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
SAO PAULO, BRAZIL - APRIL 17: Protesters opposed to the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff protest in the streets April 17, 2016 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The Lower House of Congress will hold a vote on whether to impeach Rousseff over charges of manipulating government accounts for political gains. (Photo by Victor Moriyama/Getty Images)
SAO PAULO, BRAZIL - APRIL 17: Protesters opposed to the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff protest in the streets April 17, 2016 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The Lower House of Congress will hold a vote on whether to impeach Rousseff over charges of manipulating government accounts for political gains. (Photo by Victor Moriyama/Getty Images)
Brazilians in favor of the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff watch the televised voting of the Lower House of Congress over her impeachment in Brasilia, Brazil April 17, 2016. REUTERS/Adriano Machado
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