Mother of Marine Corps nude photo scandal victim says daughter is being harassed

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BATTLE CREEK, Mich. (WXMI) -- It's a photo scandal shaking a branch of the military to its core. More than two dozen female Marines and civilians have come forward saying naked photos of them were shared on a secret Facebook page called 'Marines United.'

That page has since been deleted, but the incident is currently under investigation by the Naval Criminal Investigative Service.

One of the alleged victims, Kelsie Stone, is a West Michigan native currently living in Beaufort, South Carolina.

Stone was too emotionally distraught to speak with FOX 17 on Thursday, but we spoke with her mother, Petra McGinnis, in Battle Creek.

McGinnis says Stone moved to South Carolina a few years ago from Battle Creek, where she met her boyfriend at the time, a Sergeant in the Marine Corps. While he was away training in California, she sent him lewd photos on SnapChat in private, thinking they would never resurface. Just a few months later, her life would be turned upside.

McGinnis says her 25-year old daughter had no idea her former boyfriend saved and shared screenshots of the photos she had sent him while they were together. The pair eventually broke up, but a few months later on Valentine's Day a friend of Kelsie's, who's also a Marine, told her he saw photos of her posted in a secret Facebook group called 'Marines United.'

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PARRIS ISLAND, SC - MARCH 08: United States Marine Corps recruit Maria Martinez, 19, of Santa Anna, California trains during boot camp March 8, 2007 at Parris, Island, South Carolina. The Department of Defense has asked Congress to increase the size of the Marine Corps by 27,000 troops and the Army by 65,000 over the next five years. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
PARRIS ISLAND, SC - JANUARY 15: United States Marine Corps female recruit Jessica Waseca crawls on her back under barbed wire January 15, 2003 during the test exercise called The Crucible at boot camp at Parris Island, SC. The Marines train an average of 3,700 male recruits and 600 females a day at Parris Island. The Crucible is a 54 hour final exam to test the skills the recruits have learned during basic training. (Photo by Stephen Morton/Getty Images)
PARRIS ISLAND, SC - MARCH 08: Female United States Marine Corps recruits receive instructions for a training exercise during boot camp March 8, 2007 at Parris Island, South Carolina. The Department of Defense has asked Congress to increase the size of the Marine Corps by 27,000 troops and the Army by 65,000 over the next five years. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CAMP LEJEUNE, NC - FEBRUARY 22: Pfc. Tiffany Mash of Torrance, California leads a company of Marines, both male and female, carrying 55 pound packs at the start of a 10 kilometer training march during Marine Combat Training (MCT) on February 22, 2013 at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Since 1988 all non-infantry enlisted male Marines have been required to complete 29 days of basic combat skills training at MCT after graduating from boot camp. MCT has been required for all enlisted female Marines since 1997. About six percent of enlisted Marines are female. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CAMP LEJEUNE, NC - FEBRUARY 20: Male and female Marines climb an obstacle on the Endurance Course during Marine Combat Training (MCT) on February 20, 2013 at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Since 1988 all non-infantry enlisted male Marines have been required to complete 29 days of basic combat skills training at MCT after graduating from boot camp. MCT has been required for all enlisted female Marines since 1997. About six percent of enlisted Marines are female. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CAMP LEJEUNE, NC - FEBRUARY 20: Male and female Marines participate together in a combat conditioning exercise during Marine Combat Training (MCT) on February 20, 2013 at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Since 1988 all non-infantry enlisted male Marines have been required to complete 29 days of basic combat skills training at MCT after graduating boot camp. It has been required for enlisted female Marines since 1997. About six percent of enlisted Marines are female. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
PARRIS ISLAND, SC - FEBRUARY 25: Female Marine recruits prepare to fire on the rifle range during boot camp February 25, 2013 at MCRD Parris Island, South Carolina. All female enlisted Marines and male Marines who were living east of the Mississippi River when they were recruited attend boot camp at Parris Island. About six percent of enlisted Marines are female. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CAMP LEJEUNE, NC - FEBRUARY 22: Pvt. Tatiana Maldonado of Dallas, Texas trains with male and female Marines as she learns patrolling techniques at Marine Combat Training (MCT) on February 22, 2013 at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Since 1988 all non-infantry enlisted male Marines have been required to complete 29 days of basic combat skills training at MCT after graduating from boot camp. MCT has been required for all enlisted female Marines since 1997. About six percent of enlisted Marines are female. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
PARRIS ISLAND, SC - FEBRUARY 25: Female Marine recruits stand in formation during boot camp February 25, 2013 at MCRD Parris Island, South Carolina. All female enlisted Marines and male Marines who were living east of the Mississippi River when they were recruited attend boot camp at Parris Island. About six percent of enlisted Marines are female. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CAMP LEJEUNE, NC - FEBRUARY 22: Pvt. Megan Randall of Huntersville, North Carolina cleans a machine gun during Marine Combat Training (MCT) on February 22, 2013 at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Since 1988 all non-infantry enlisted male Marines have been required to complete 29 days of basic combat skills training at MCT after graduating from boot camp. MCT has been required for all enlisted female Marines since 1997. About six percent of enlisted Marines are female. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
PARRIS ISLAND, SC - FEBRUARY 25: Cpl. David Peck (C) from New Market, Tennessee instructs female Marines as they prepare to fire on the rifle range during boot camp February 25, 2013 at MCRD Parris Island, South Carolina. All female enlisted Marines and male Marines who were living east of the Mississippi River when they were recruited attend boot camp at Parris Island. About six percent of enlisted Marines are female. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CAMP LEJEUNE, NC - FEBRUARY 20: Male and female Marines do abdominal crunches while running the Endurance Course during Marine Combat Training (MCT) on February 20, 2013 at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Since 1988 all non-infantry enlisted male Marines have been required to complete 29 days of basic combat skills training at MCT after graduating from boot camp. MCT has been required for all enlisted female Marines since 1997. About six percent of enlisted Marines are female. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CAMP LEJEUNE, NC - FEBRUARY 22: Sgt. Jarrod Simmons tries to motivate his squad of Marines before they head out on a 10 kilometer training march carrying 55 pound packs during Marine Combat Training (MCT) on February 22, 2013 at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Since 1988 all non-infantry enlisted male Marines have been required to complete 29 days of basic combat skills training at MCT after graduating from boot camp. MCT has been required for all enlisted female Marines since 1997. About six percent of enlisted Marines are female. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
PARRIS ISLAND, SC - FEBRUARY 25: Female and male Marine recruits listen to instructions as they prepare for a swimming test during boot camp February 25, 2013 at MCRD Parris Island, South Carolina. Male and female recruits are expected to meet the same standards during their swim qualification test. All female enlisted Marines and male Marines who were living east of the Mississippi River when they were recruited attend boot camp at Parris Island. About six percent of enlisted Marines are female. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
A U.S. marine drinks the blood of a cobra during a jungle survival exercise with the Thai Navy as part of the "Cobra Gold 2013" joint military exercise, at a military base in Chon Buri province February 20, 2013. About 13,000 soldiers from seven countries, Thailand, U.S., Singapore, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea and Malaysia are participating in the 11-day military exercise. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (THAILAND - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY SOCIETY)
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"Kelsie is a bartender at a local tavern down there," said McGinnis. "Living in a military town, she knows a lot of military members. One of her friends is a Marine and this individual contacted Kelsie on Valentine's Day and said, 'Hey, do you realize that there are some pictures of you on this Facebook group and they're inappropriate pictures?' Kelsie asked him to send some screenshots of it and he did. Sure enough, there were pictures she had sent to her ex while he was training in California."

Since the photos were shared, McGinnis says her daughter has been harassed both on social media and in person. She says men have even approached her at the local tavern where she works.

"She's been called a whore too many times to even count," said McGinnis. "She's pretty much secluded herself now because everybody knows about it and knows that she is a part of this. He put the pictures on there to make her a target. He made her a target because it wasn't long after that that Kelsie started getting comments, people coming into her work. Kelsie said at one point it got so bad that she didn't even want to get out of her car to pump gas."

Stone's father is a retired Gunnery Sergeant in the Marine Corps. McGinnis says this is not the Corps her daughter was raised to know.

"They were raised with this male figure who is a Marine who they very rarely heard curse, they never saw him be disrespectful, they saw him take care of business and take care of his home," said McGinnis. "This is the image of Marines they have in their head. This is the image Kelsie has in her head of how a Marine should be, especially a non-commissioned officer. Honor and integrity is what the girls were raised with. This has her rethinking the way she views the world."

Stone is just one of many alleged victims whose photos were posted on that Facebook page. In fact, on Wednesday, famed attorney Gloria Allred announced a lawsuit on behalf of two female Marines whose photos were shared without consent.

"This is a stain on their conduct as United States Marines, currently serving or former Marines," said Allred.

While that Facebook page and those Marines allegedly behind it remain under investigation, McGinnis hopes the man who shared Stone's photos will be dishonorably discharged.

"I don't see how he can remain in the Marine Corps and the Marine Corps keep its integrity, or any of the guys who have done this," said McGinnis.

The Commandant of the Marine Corps General Robert Neller released a video message on Tuesday aimed at the Marines involved in the incident. Neller says this behavior is not that of true warriors or war fighters and asks those involved to ask themselves if they really want to be Marines.

"We are all in 24/7 and if that commitment to your excellence interferes with your 'me time' or if you can't or are unwilling to commit to contributing 100 percent to our Corps' war fighting ability by being a good teammate and improving cohesion and trust, then I have to ask you: Do you really want to be a Marine?" said General Neller.

While McGinnis says she's happy to hear the Marine Corps is addressing the issue, she wants to see action.

"I believe [Neller] because it would almost be a sin not to believe the Commandant of the Marine Corps, but right now I'm tired of words," said McGinnis. "I want some actions. Show me that this is what you're going to do and then I'll fully believe you."

McGinnis hopes this incident sends a message to everyone to think twice before sharing inappropriate photos. The Naval Criminal Investigative Service is handling the investigation and they're working to see if felony charges are warranted. Any military members found to have posted the pictures without consent could be facing some time behind bars.

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The Marine Corps band called 'The Presidents Own' was created in 1798. Here they are in 1893.

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The Marines pose for a photo in Egypt in 1907.

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Marines pose with a German trench mortar in 1918.

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Marines duing WWI circa 1918. 

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Marines run a drill during combat training in Germany, 1918. 

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Grumman FF-2, circa 1930

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Pearl Harbor survivor Technical Sergeant Anglin on December 8th 1941.

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Marines patiently wait to be called for 'chow time' 1943.

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Marines admire a photo of a pin-up girl in 1943 while in Japan. 

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James Wrobel, Designer of VMF-312 Insignia, circa 1943

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Marines arrive on the Japanese island Saipan. 1944 WWII

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Marines stationed in Bougainville.

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Marines wait for letters from home to be distributed. 

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Pictured here : 'Code Talkers'  1943 were a group a Native American Marines would used their native language to relay coded messages. 

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 Marines fire a 155mm Howitzer Iwo Jima.

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A Navy Corpsman administers blood plasma to a Marine. 1944

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Marines are surrounded by bullet shells at  the base of Mount Suribachi.

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Marines raise the American flag in Iwo Jima. 1945

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Marines celebrate the end of WWII. 1945

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Korean War 1950. 

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Female Marines began training in Parris Island, South Carolina, 1949.

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Marines line up to receive items from home. Usually soda, candy and cigarettes. 

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A welcome banner can be seen here in Vietnam welcoming the Marines in Danang in 1965. 

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A Marine rests while he can in Vietnam. 1968. 

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Moment of Peace: Corporal Larry G. Nabb (Brush, Colorado) finds a moment of peace in front of a gaily decorated Christmas tree at Quang Tri Combat Base. Nabb is serving as a truck driver with 3d Marine Division’s Headquarters Battalion, and is one of thousands of Marines celebrating their Christmas in Vietnam 

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Private First Class Ronald Duplantis prepares a 122mm enemy field weapon for shipment.

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Marines carry supplies from a cargo plane to a nearby base. 1969.

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Marines register to vote for the 1969 presidential election.

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David Gurfein sits next to a Christmas tree in Saudi Arabia while serving during Operation Desert Shield/Storm.

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Marines prepare to enter Saddam Husseins palace in 2003.

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U.S. Marine Corp Assaultman Kirk Dalrymple watches as a statue of Iraq's President Saddam Hussein falls in central Baghdad in this April 9, 2003 file photo. U.S. troops pulled down a 20-foot (six-metre) high statue of President Saddam Hussein in central Baghdad and Iraqis danced on it in contempt for the man who ruled them with an iron grip for 24 years. In scenes reminiscent of the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, Iraqis earlier took a sledgehammer to the marble plinth under the statue of Saddam. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic/Files (IRAQ - Tags: TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY CONFLICT) ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE IS PART OF PACKAGE '30 YEARS OF REUTERS PICTURES' TO FIND ALL 56 IMAGES SEARCH '30 YEARS'

Marines can be seen fighting in Fallujah in 2004.

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'Darkhorse' Marines lost the most men in Afghanistan over any other Marine unit. They can be seen here in 2010.

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Cpl. Chris Lawler observes a  F/A-18C Hornet with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 122 approach during Exercise Pitch Black 2016 on Aug. 9, 2016.

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Around 20,000 recruits are trained in Parris Island every year. 

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Sgt. Justin Glenn Burnside motivates a recruit with Echo Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion 

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Marines take their oath at the 2012 U.S. Naval Academy Class of 2012 graduation.

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