American Health Care Act: Who wins and loses in the GOP's Obamacare replacement

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In the wake of the House GOP's unveiling of the American Health Care Act -- proposed legislation they hope will overhaul former President Barack Obama's signature Affordable Care Act, health care experts are now weighing in on who wins and loses in the self-proclaimed replacement to "Obamacare."

On behalf of the Trump administration, Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price tweeted his letter of support on Tuesday morning to congressional committee chairmen, in which he said the new American Health Care Act (AHCA) aligns with President Trump's goal of "rescuing Americans from the failures of the Affordable Care Act."

According to a new S&P Global ratings report, though, as much as 10 million Americans could lose their health insurance under the AHCA.

Comparing and contrasting multiple points of research, here is a sampling of those who could end up "winners" and "losers" if the current draft of the American Health Care Act becomes law.

RELATED: Protests for and against Obamacare

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Protests for and against Obamacare

Tea Party Patriots supporters hold signs protesting the Affordable Care Act in front of the Supreme Court as the court hears arguments on the health care reform bill on Tuesday, March 27, 2012.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Affordable Care Act supporters wave signs outside the Supreme Court after the court upheld court's Obamacare on Thursday, June 25, 2015.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A man holds signs during a protest on the second day of oral arguments for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in front of the U.S. Supreme Court building on March 27, 2012 in Washington, DC. Today is the second of three days the high court has set aside to hear six hours of arguments over the constitutionality President Barack Obama's Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

(Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Sister Caroline attends a rally with other supporters of religious freedom to praise the Supreme Court's decision in the Hobby Lobby, contraception coverage requirement case on June 30, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. Oklahoma-based Hobby Lobby, which operates a chain of arts-and-craft stores, challenged the provision and the high court ruled 5-4 that requiring family-owned corporations to pay for insurance coverage for contraception under the Affordable Care Act violated a federal law protecting religious freedom.

(Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

An Obamacare supporter counter protests a Tea Party rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in the morning hours of March 27, 2012 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court continued to hear oral arguments on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Affordable Care Act supporters hold up signs outside the Supreme Court as they wait for the court's decision on Obamacare on Thursday, June 25, 2015.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Ron Kirby holds a sign while marching in protest of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on March 26, 2012 in Washington, DC. Today the high court, which has set aside six hours over three days, will hear arguments over the constitutionality President Barack Obama's Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

(Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

A protester waves his bible in the air as he overpowered by cheers from supporters of the Affordable Care Act as they celebrate the opinion for health care outside of the Supreme Court in Washington,Thursday June 25, 2015. The Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the nationwide tax subsidies under President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, in a ruling that preserves health insurance for millions of Americans.

(Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Nuns, who are opposed to the Affordable Care Act's contraception mandate, and other supporters rally outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, March 23, 2016. On Wednesday morning, the Supreme Court is scheduled to hear oral arguments in Zubik v. Burwell, a consolidated case brought by religious groups challenging a process for opting out of the Affordable Care Act's contraception mandate.

(Drew Angerer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Supporters of contraception rally before Zubik v. Burwell, an appeal brought by Christian groups demanding full exemption from the requirement to provide insurance covering contraception under the Affordable Care Act, is heard by the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington March 23, 2016.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Protestors hold placards challenging 'Obamacare' outside of the US Supreme Court on March 4, 2015 in Washington, DC. The US Supreme Court heard a second challenge to US President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act. The US Supreme Court faces a momentous case Wednesday on the sweeping health insurance reform law that President Barack Obama wants to leave as part of his legacy. The question before the court is whether the seven million people or more who subscribed via the government's website can obtain tax subsidies that make the coverage affordable. A ruling is expected in June.

(MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

 Linda Door (L) protests against President Obama's health care plan in front of the U.S. Supreme Court Building on March 26, 2012 in Washington, DC. Today the high court, which has set aside six hours over three days, will hear arguments over the constitutionality President Barack Obama's Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

(Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Supporters of the Affordable Care Act celebrate after the Supreme Court up held the law in the 6-3 vote at the Supreme Court in Washington June 25, 2015. The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the nationwide availability of tax subsidies that are crucial to the implementation of President Barack Obama's signature healthcare law, handing a major victory to the president.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

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Winner: Young Americans

First, the AHCA keeps the Affordable Care Act (ACA) element that allows parents to keep young adults as old as 26 on their insurance plan.

According to CNN Money, younger Americans would also see their annual premiums go down. The ACA put levers in place that meant younger policyholders were subsidizing older ones. This would change under the AHCA, because the bill gives insurers the ability to charge elderly at a higher rate. According to a Milliman study for the AARP, Americans age 20 to 29 could save anywhere from $700 a year to $4,000, on average.

Loser: Elderly Americans

As was previously stated above, the AHCA allows insurers to charge older policyholders at a higher rate. (With the ACA, insurers were limited to charging those in their 50s and 60s a maximum three times what they charge younger policyholders.) With the AHCA, CNN Money reports that gap would be widened five-to-one.

According to a Kaiser study, a reduction in tax credits under the AHCA means an average 60-year-old making $50,000 a year in Lamb County, Texas would see a 51 percent decrease in their federal tax refund from $8,240 to $4,000.

According to a Milliman study, adults ages 60 to 64 would see their annual premiums jump 22 percent, or nearly $3,200, to nearly $18,000.

SEE ALSO: Republicans speak out against House GOP's Obamacare replacement

Winner: Healthy people

Policyholders under age 30 were able under the ACA to buy plans with lower monthly premiums and higher deductibles called "catastrophic plans." Enrollees, however, were unable to use subsidies to pay the premiums.

The AHCA would change this, allowing anyone to enroll in a "catastrophic" plan -- and introducing tax credits as a means to pay the premium.

Loser: Anyone who benefits from Medicaid

About 70 million Americans are currently covered with health insurance through the Medicaid program. More than 11 million alone gained coverage after the ACA went into effect.

"It's not hyperbole to say this bill ends the Medicaid program as we know it," said Aviva Aron-Dine of the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities, and the former senior counselor to former Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell.

As POLITICO's Dan Diamond writes, "The bill would cut back funding for states to pay for the ACA's Medicaid expansion, shifting from open-ended federal matching payments to per capita lump sum payments that would likely force governors to shrink the size of their programs."

Medicaid helps many lower-income people and families, and MIT economist Jonathan Gruber says of the AHCA there is "really no point to this effort" because of the way it burdens that demographic of policyholder.

"There's really no point to this effort," Gruber said to NPR on Wednesday morning. "It cuts help for the poor by replacing income-based tax credits — which make health insurance affordable — with flat tax credits, which make health insurance unaffordable."

SEE ALSO: GOP's Obamacare repeal and replace plan could cost $600B

Winner: Higher-income people

The ACA included two specific taxes that were imposed on wealthier policyholders, which experts say was to help pay for the law. The AHCA includes many changes to the tax code, and would eliminate both of these taxes.

According to the Tax Policy Center, "Nearly all families affected by the additional payroll and investment taxes are in the top 5 percent of income, with most of the burden borne by families in the top 1 percent of income." According to a Joint Tax Committee study, removing these two tax credits would cost $275 billion over ten years.

The AHCA would also allow a higher contribution allotment in Health Savings Accounts, which are primarily used by policyholders who can afford to save money specifically for health care.

Loser: Planned Parenthood

The AHCA would federally defund Planned Parenthood for one fiscal year. The White House reportedly offered Planned Parenthood an opportunity to keep their funding if they stopped offering abortions as part of their services. Planned Parenthood then reportedly rejected this proposition.

Winner: Insurance companies

The bill does strike down the ACA's individual mandate -- which will likely spur a dip in enrollment -- but one of the biggest differences between the ACA and AHCA is the 30 percent surcharge on policyholders who fail to keep up continuous coverage. Also, where the ACA allowed insurance companies to deduct a max $500,000 of their executives' pay as a business expense, the AHCA would repeal that capped amount starting in 2018.

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Rex Tillerson, U.S. Secretary of State for President Donald Trump, left, speaks as U.S. President Donald Trump listen after the swearing-in ceremony in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017. Tillerson won Senate confirmation as secretary of state after lawmakers split mostly along party lines on President Trump's choice of an oilman with no government experience but a career negotiating billions of dollars of energy deals worldwide. Photographer: Michael Reynolds/Pool via Bloomberg
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