Wikileaks document dump alleges the CIA can hack almost everything

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

If the CIA wants to peer inside your digital life, it'll find a way, no matter what you've done to protect yourself.

That's the basic message inherent in a trove of documents dumped by Wikileaks Tuesday that allegedly exposes a slew of CIA hacking techniques.

SEE ALSO: Julian Assange tweeted for the first time, as if the world needs more tweets

Wikileaks claims this document dump is the first in a series it's calling "Vault 7." The group says it's the largest release of documents pertaining to the CIA in the agency's history.

See more on WikiLeaks:

6 PHOTOS
Julian Assange
See Gallery
Julian Assange
A supporter of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange holds a banner outside the Ecuadorian embassy in London as he marks three years since Assange claimed asylum in the embassy on June 19, 2015. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange clocks up three years inside the Ecuadoran embassy in London today, after claiming that Swedish prosecutors cancelled a landmark meeting in his case earlier this week. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
A supporter of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange holds banners outside the Ecuadorian embassy in London as he marks three years since Assange claimed asylum in the embassy on June 19, 2015. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange clocks up three years inside the Ecuadoran embassy in London today, after claiming that Swedish prosecutors cancelled a landmark meeting in his case earlier this week. AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange makes a speech from the balcony of the Ecuadorian Embassy, in central London, Britain February 5, 2016. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls/Files
Julian Assange, Founder and Editor-in-Chief of WikiLeaks speaks via video link during a press conference on the occasion of the ten year anniversary celebration of WikiLeaks in Berlin, Germany, October 4, 2016. REUTERS/Axel Schmidt TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appears on screen via video link during his participation as a guest panelist in an International Seminar on the 60th anniversary of the college of Journalists of Chile in Santiago, Chile, July 12, 2016. REUTERS/Rodrigo Garrido
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

"Year Zero," the title of the first release, contains 8,761 documents that allegedly come from "an isolated, high-security network situated inside the CIA's Center for Cyber Intelligence" at its headquarters in Langley, Virgina.

"'Year Zero' introduces the scope and direction of the CIA's global covert hacking program, its malware arsenal and dozens of 'zero day' weaponized exploits against a wide range of U.S. and European company products, include Apple's iPhone, Google's Android and Microsoft's Windows and even Samsung TVs, which are turned into covert microphones," Wikileaks wrote in a press release announcing the trove of documents.

According to the release, the CIA can also "bypass the encryption of WhatsApp, Signal, Telegram, Wiebo, Confide and Cloackman."

The press release paints a picture of bureaucratic rivalry between the CIA and the NSA, both known for covert spying operations of one kind or another. Wikileaks alleges the CIA has achieved "political and budgetary preeminence" over its rival and built a world-class hacking team so it no longer has to rely on the NSA.

If the allegations in the press release are true, they should send chills down the spines of anyone who had the fanciful idea they could avoid government spies with encrypted chat apps.

That is far from the only stunning item in the release as well as the documents. Wikileaks, of course, has had significant credibility issues since it began to align itself with President Donald Trump during his campaign for the presidency against rival Hillary Clinton.

Mashable will be working to verify specific claims in the documents to the best of our ability.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners