'They ought to be careful': Trump raises eyebrows with heavy promotion of Exxon announcement

President Donald Trump raised eyebrows after he posted five congratulatory tweets promoting a Monday announcement from the energy giant Exxon Mobil, the company from which his secretary of state came to the administration.

The company highlighted earlier in the day that it was expanding its manufacturing operation along the Gulf Coast, creating more than 45,000 jobs in the region.

Initially, the White House posted a press release reiterating the Exxon Mobil news. That press release contained a paragraph that appeared to be copied, almost word-for-word, from the Exxon announcement.

Trump, who also wrote that the move from Exxon showed "we are already winning again," then posted a roughly minute-long video praising the company soon after the administration's release.

That video was pinned to the top of his account for a brief time.

"I'm very pleased to announce that the great company, Exxon Mobil, Is going to be investing $20 billion in the Gulf Coast and the Gulf Coast region," the president said. "It'll be 45,000 jobs, and they're great jobs. $100,000 average. And this is something that was done, to a large extent, because of our policies and the policies of this new administration having to do with regulation and so many other things."

"I said we're bringing back jobs, and this is one big example of it," Trump continued, adding, "I want to thank very much Exxon Mobil. Special company, special people."

In the paragraph that appeared to be lifted from the Exxon Mobil release and inserted into the White House's release, it was made clear that the investment was part of a plan that began in 2013.

"Exxon Mobil is strategically investing in new refining and chemical-manufacturing projects in the U.S. Gulf Coast region to expand its manufacturing and export capacity," the release read. "The company's Growing the Gulf expansion program, consists of 11 major chemical, refining, lubricant and liquefied natural gas projects at proposed new and existing facilities along the Texas and Louisiana coasts. Investments began in 2013 and are expected to continue through at least 2022."

Exxon Mobil told Business Insider that it passed along the news to the White House hoping to shed light on its investment in the region.

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Exxon Mobil Corporation Chairman and Chief Executive Rex Tillerson speaks at a news conference following the Exxon Mobil annual shareholders meeting in Dallas, Texas May 30, 2007. Tillerson told reporters on Wednesday that the construction of the Mackenzie pipeline project in Canada was not viable at current cost levels.

(REUTERS/Mike Stone)

Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin (R) and Exxon CEO Rex Tillerson look on at a signing ceremony in the Black Sea resort of Sochi August 30, 2011. Exxon and Russia's Rosneft signed a deal on Tuesday to develop oil and gas reserves in the Russian Arctic, opening up one of the last unconquered drilling frontiers to the global industry No.1.

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Executives from six major oil companies are sworn in to testify at a U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee on the "Consolidation in the Oil and Gas Industry: Raising Prices?" on Capitol Hill in Washington March 14, 2006. The executives are (L-R) Rex Tillerson, Chairman and CEO of ExxonMobil Corp., James Mulva, Chairman and CEO of ConocoPhillips, David O'Reilly, Chairman and CEO of Chevron Corp., Bill Klesse, CEO of Valero Energy Corp., John Hofmeister, President of Shell Oil Company and Ross Pillari, President and CEO of BP America Inc.

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ExxonMobil Chairman and CEO Rex Tillerson speaks during the IHS CERAWeek 2015 energy conference in Houston, Texas April 21, 2015.

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Chairman, President and CEO of Exxon Mobil Corporation Rex Tillerson watches a tee shot on the 13th hole during the first round of the Pebble Beach National Pro-Am golf tournament at the Monterey Peninsula Country Club course in Pebble Beach, California, February 6, 2014.

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Rex Tillerson, chairman and CEO of ExxonMobil; John Watson, chairman and CEO of Chevron Corp.; James Mulva, chairman and CEO of ConocoPhillips; Marvin Odum, president of Shell Oil Co.; and Lamar McKay, president and chairman of BP America Inc.; are sworn in during the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Environment hearing on their safety practices as oil continues to leak into the Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon oil rig - operated by BP - exploded last month.

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ExxonMobil Chairman and CEO Rex Tillerson speaks during the IHS CERAWeek 2015 energy conference in Houston, Texas April 21, 2015.

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WASHINGTON, DC - May 12: James Mulva, chairman and CEO of ConocoPhillips; and Rex Tillerson, chairman and CEO of Exxon Mobil Corp.; during the Senate Finance hearing on oil and gas tax incentives.

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Chairman and CEO of Exxon Mobil Corporation Rex W. Tillerson and Norway Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg attends the United Nations Foundation's global leadership dinner at The Pierre Hotel on November 8, 2011 in New York City.

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Rex Tillerson, chief executive officer of Exxon Mobil Corp., left, speaks with Daniel Yergin, vice chairman of IHS Cambridge Energy Research Associates Inc., during the 2015 IHS CERAWeek conference in Houston, Texas, U.S., on Tuesday, April 21, 2015. CERAWeek 2015, in its 34th year, will provide new insights and critically-important dialogue with decision-makers in the oil and gas, electric power, coal, renewables, and nuclear sectors from around the world.

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Renda St. Clair and Rex Tillerson attend the reopening celebration at Ford's Theatre on February 11, 2009 in Washington, DC.

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Rex Tillerson, chairman and CEO of ExxonMobil, listens during a meeting at the Department of the Interior September 22, 2010 in Washington, DC. Secretary of the Interior Kenneth L. Salazar hosted Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Gulf Oil Spill National Incident Commander Adm. Thad Allen (Ret.), representatives from the private sector and others to discus strengthening the containment abilities to deep water oil and gas well blowouts like the recent BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

(Photo by Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images)

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"Our objective was to illustrate a very significant investment that we're making in the Gulf Coast region, which is creating thousands of jobs and billions of dollars in economic activity — all thanks to the shale revolution," Bill Holbrook, a senior adviser for Exxon Mobil, told Business Insider in an email. "We provided information about our announcement to the White House and they decided they wanted to issue a congratulatory press release."

The touting of Exxon's move fit with Trump's promise that jobs would be created in the country under his watch. But it entered a "gray area" in terms of ethically acceptable language and promotion from the White House of an individual business, experts said.

"They ought to be careful," Richard Painter, a law professor at the University of Minnesota and former top ethics lawyer for President George W. Bush, told Business Insider. "I mean, we would advise them to distance themselves, congratulate a company for the good work they do creating jobs, but not doing so much that it looks like you're shilling for the company."

As Painter put it, it's "unusual" to be "mentioning a particular company this much."

Rep. Elijah Cummings, the ranking member on the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, made his objection to Trump's promotion of Exxon's move very clear in a statement to Business Insider.

"The White House has now become the mouthpiece of the oil industry — literally," The Maryland Democrat said. "This is certainly the opposite of the President's promise to drain the swamp."

Adding to the appearance of an ethical conflict is the fact Trump's secretary of state, Rex Tillerson, was the CEO of Exxon Mobil up until being tapped to lead the State Department by Trump.

Tillerson did take steps to clear up his potential conflicts of interest prior to his Senate confirmation hearing, announcing in accordance with the company that he would receive a $180 million retirement package if confirmed. In exchange, he gave up his more than 2 million Exxon shares he'd be set to receive over the next decade, which could have been worth more than the payment, if Exxon's stock appreciates in that time.

The left-leaning ethics watchdog group Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington still saw a potential conflict though with the substantial praise of Exxon from Trump.

"The president went out of his way to praise the company that until very recently was led by his secretary of state," Jordan Libowitz, a CREW spokesman, said in a statement to Business Insider. "He went so far as to crib promotional material from the business. There appears to be a pretty significant conflict of interest there."

Painter said the promotion of Exxon's move should avoid significant scrutiny so long as Tillerson was not involved, which it did not appear he was. But Trump's move enters the same territory as White House Counselor Kellyanne Conway's decision to tout Ivanka Trump's fashion brands in a Fox News interview, asking viewers to buy the product.

While Conway's move was a "blatantly obvious" violation of the ethics rules in place, Painter said, Trump's posts were more borderline. He said it's in Trump's interest to have jobs created in the US, and it's fair to congratulate a company for doing so, just as Trump has done for other companies, such as Carrier, LL Bean, and Ford.

"But at what point does that cross the line to where you're shilling for a company that your secretary of state formerly has a close relationship with," he said, later adding, "At a certain point, if this continues, could reach a point where the White House is advertising for these companies. And then the companies are in effect advertising through the White House."

Prior to Monday's tweetstorm praising Exxon, and his decision to nominate Tillerson to lead the State Department, Trump had posted one tweet mentioning the company.

"Exxon donated $250g to Obama's inaugural," he wrote in 2013, linking to a Breitbart News story. "I guess the Democrats have no problem accepting money from 'big oil.'"

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Senator Elizabeth Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, listens as U.S. President Donald Trump, not pictured, speaks during a joint session of Congress in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017. Trump will press Congress to carry out his priorities for replacing Obamacare, jump-starting the economy and bolstering the nation's defenses in an address eagerly awaited by lawmakers, investors and the public who want greater clarity on his policy agenda.

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