Six years after Fukushima nuclear disaster, residents trickle back to deserted towns

NAMIE, Fukushima (Reuters) - A truck occasionally whizzes past the darkened shops with cracked walls and fallen signs that line the main street of Japan's mostly deserted seaside town of Namie.

Workers repair a damaged home nearby, and about 60 employees busily prepare for the return of former residents in the largely untouched town hall. Not far away, two wild boars stick their snouts in someone's yard, snuffling for food.

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Residents return years after Fukushima disaster
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Residents return years after Fukushima disaster

A classroom at Ukedo elementary school, damaged by the March 11, 2011 tsunami, is seen near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Namie town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, March 1, 2017.

(REUTERS/Toru Hanai)

Class photographs are seen in a classroom at Ukedo elementary school, damaged by the March 11, 2011 tsunami, near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Namie town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, March 1, 2017.

(REUTERS/Toru Hanai)

A wild boar is seen at a residential area in an evacuation zone near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Namie town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, March 1, 2017.

(REUTERS/Toru Hanai)

Wave is seen at an area damaged by the March 11, 2011 tsunami near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, in Namie town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, February 28, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Toru Hanai)

Stone statues of Jizo and gravestones are seen near a seaside devastated by the March 11, 2011 tsunami in Namie town near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, February 28, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Toru Hanai)

Sushi chef, Yasuo Fujita, who evacuated from Namie town near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, works at his restaurant in Tokyo, Japan, January 26, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Toru Hanai)

A house damaged by the March 11, 2011 tsunami is seen in front of chimneys (C L) of Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant at an evacuation zone in Namie town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, February 28, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Toru Hanai)

Ukedo Elementary School Principal, Chieko Oyama, visits the school damaged by the March 11, 2011 tsunami, near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Namie town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, March 1, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Toru Hanai)

Ukedo elementary school, damaged by the March 11, 2011 tsunami, is seen near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Namie town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, March 1, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Toru Hanai)

Owner of Asada timber factory, Munehiro Asada, poses for a photo at his factory's timber-yard in Namie town, near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, February 28, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Toru Hanai)

A Geiger counter, measuring a radiation level of 0.127 microsievert per hour, is seen at an area damaged by the March 11, 2011 tsunami, near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, in Namie town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, March 1, 2017.

(REUTERS/Toru Hanai)

A house damaged by the March 11, 2011 tsunami is seen at a residential area in an evacuation zone near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Namie town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, February 28, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Toru Hanai)

A Geiger counter, measuring a radiation level of 0.106 microsievert per hour, is seen at a temporary housing complex that accommodates nuclear evacuees from Namie town, in Nihonmatsu, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, February 27, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Toru Hanai)

Shoichiro Sakamoto, head of Tomioka Town's animal control hunters group, patrols at a residential area in an evacuation zone near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Tomioka town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, March 2, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Toru Hanai)

Members of Tomioka Town's animal control hunters group, set up a booby trap for wild boars at a residential area in an evacuation zone near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Tomioka town, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, March 2, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Toru Hanai)

Norimasa Sega, president of a temporary housing complex that accommodates nuclear evacuees from Namie town, is reflected in a mirror during an interview with Reuters at his temporary house in Nihonmatsu, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, February 27, 2017.

(REUTERS/Toru Hanai)

Yuji Kimura, the sole full-time doctor at Namie's sole clinic, which is slated to start operation on March 28, poses for a photo at the town's temporary clinic in Namie town, near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, February 28, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Toru Hanai)

Tamotsu Baba, mayor of Namie town, speaks during an interview with Reuters at his office in the town's temporary town office in Nihonmatsu, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, February 27, 2017. 

(REUTERS/Toru Hanai)

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Signs of life are returning nearly six years after panicked residents fled radiation spewed by the nearby Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, when it was struck by an earthquake and tsunami.

Still, only several hundred of the original 21,500 residents plan to return in the first wave, estimates Hidezo Sato, a former seed merchant who helped draw up a blueprint to rebuild the town.

"As a person who used to sell seeds for a living, I believe now is a time to sow seeds" for rebuilding, said Sato, 71. "Harvesting is far away. But I hope I can manage to help bring about fruition."

Since November, people who registered have been allowed to spend nights in the town, but residents will not need permission to stay round the clock after Japan lifts evacuation orders for parts of Namie and three other towns at the end of March.

Just 2.5 miles away from the wrecked plant, Namie is the closest area cleared for the return of residents since the disaster of March 11, 2011.

But the town will never be the same, as radiation contamination has left a big area off limits. And it may never be inhabitable.

More than half - 53 percent - of former residents have decided not to return, a government poll showed last September. They cited concerns over radiation and the safety of the nuclear plant, which is being dismantled in an arduous, 40-year effort.

OLD FOLKS

More than three-quarters of those aged 29 or less do not intend to return, which means old people could form the bulk of the town's population in a future largely devoid of children.

"Young people will not go back," said Yasuo Fujita, a former Namie resident who runs a restaurant in Tokyo, the capital.

Fujita said he did not want to live near a possible storage site for contaminated soil, now being systematically removed.

Radiation levels at Namie town hall stood at 0.07 microsieverts per hour on Feb. 28, little different from the rest of Japan.

But in the nearby town of Tomioka, a dosimeter read 1.48 microsieverts an hour, nearly 30 times higher than in downtown Tokyo, underscoring lingering radiation hotspots.

For the towns' evacuation orders to be lifted, radiation must fall below 20 millisieverts per year. They must also have functioning utilities and telecoms systems, besides basic health, elderly care and postal services.

54 PHOTOS
Fukushima plant workers 5 years after earthquake/tsunami
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Fukushima plant workers 5 years after earthquake/tsunami
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 25: Employees work on the construction of the 'Ice Wall' which will use coolants to create a 30 metre deepl wall of ice to prevent groundwater from leaking into the reactors at the Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on February 25, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 25: A general view of Reactors 5 and 6 as workers continue the decontamination and decommissioning process at the Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s embattled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on February 25, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 25: (Editors Note: This image has been digitally altered to protect employee privacy rights) Workers continue the decontamination and reconstruction process at the Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s embattled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on February 25, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 25: A radiation monitor sits outside the anti-seismic building as the decontamination process continues at the Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s embattled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on February 25, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 25: TEPCO employees show a member of the media the decontamination and decommissioning process at the Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s embattled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on February 25, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 24: Workers work on new radiation contaminated water tanks at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Five years on, the decontamination and decommissioning process at the Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s embattled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant continues on February 25, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 24: Workers continue the decontamination and reconstruction process at the base of the reactors at the Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s embattled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on February 24, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 24: TEPCO employees work at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Five years on, the decontamination and decommissioning process at the Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s embattled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant continues on February 25, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 24: Workers are scanned for radiation exposure after returning from working outside at the Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s embattled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on February 24, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 24: Workers get changed into their protective clothing inside the anti-seismic building before working on the radiation decontamination process at the Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s embattled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on February 24, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Masaya Uehara of Kajima Corporation poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Uehara of Kajima Corporation works on the project to build the ice wall that blocks the groundwater flow from the mountain side into the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Uehara says It is disappointing when some people have negative opinions about his job, but at the same time it is encouraging and makes him want to prove them wrong. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Kentaro Saga of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Saga works on the ice wall project at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Saga says that he feels a big responsibility working on the ice wall to control the groundwater flow, because no one has done it before, and it cannot fail. Prior to the ice wall project, Saga also led the project to build a gas turbine power plant that substitutes Fukushima Daiichi's electricity production in such short period as three years. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Kei Kobayashi of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Kobayashi works on the water purification system at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Kobayashi says the whole experience has been rewarding as he learns something new every day. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Hideaki Tokuma of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Tokuma manages the contaminated water tanks at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Tokuma says he feels his job is challenging and rewarding. Tokuma says there is no routine work and every issue is new, and it is as though finding a way, laying the railway and operating a train all on his own. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Eiji Sakata of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Sakata works in the team that oversees the overall safety control in construction sites in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Sakata says the safety control in Fukushima Daiichi is more difficult than other places as they have to memorize everything as they cannot freely take the documents in and out of the site, and the verbal communication is harder as the workers are always wearing masks. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Yusuke Nakagawa of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Nakagawa works in the team that operates the robotics used to de-contaminate in the reactor buildings. Nakagawa says he wants to contribute to the recovery of Fukushima, and de-contaminating the reactors is the crucial task needed to proceed the reactor decommission, the most important issue of Fukushima Daiichi. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Akira Ono, the Fukuhima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Chief of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Ono says he takes pride in his work. His job is very difficult but his team works hard towards the decommission of the reactors for the recovery of Fukushima, and works safely not to worry the society and people in Fukushima. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Hideaki Tokuma of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Tokuma manages the contaminated water tanks at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Tokuma says he feels his job is challenging and rewarding. Tokuma says there is no routine work and every issue is new, and it is as though finding a way, laying the railway and operating a train all on his own. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Hideaki Tokuma of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Tokuma manages the contaminated water tanks at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Tokuma says he feels his job is challenging and rewarding. Tokuma says there is no routine work and every issue is new, and it is as though finding a way, laying the railway and operating a train all on his own. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Yusuke Nakagawa of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Nakagawa works in the team that operates the robotics used to de-contaminate in the reactor buildings. Nakagawa says he wants to contribute to the recovery of Fukushima, and de-contaminating the reactors is the crucial task needed to proceed the reactor decommission, the most important issue of Fukushima Daiichi. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Isao Abe of Kajima Corporation poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Abe works on the ice walls to block the groundwater flow from the sides into the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Ever since the disaster happened, his colleagues in his team was assigned to work in the Fukushima Daiichi, so Abe knew that his turn would come soon or later. Abe feels it is such an important job. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Shinichi Koga of Kajima Corporation poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Koga works on the project to build the ice wall that blocks the groundwater flow from the ocean side into the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Koga says that the difficult part of his jobs is the environment where he has to wear these protective gears, and there are many restrictions and his tasks require him to ask for permissions from the regulation authorities to proceed. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Yusuke Nakagawa of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Nakagawa works in the team that operates the robotics used to de-contaminate in the reactor buildings. Nakagawa says he wants to contribute to the recovery of Fukushima, and de-contaminating the reactors is the crucial task needed to proceed the reactor decommission, the most important issue of Fukushima Daiichi. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Masaya Uehara of Kajima Corporation poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Uehara of Kajima Corporation works on the project to build the ice wall that blocks the groundwater flow from the mountain side into the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Uehara says It is disappointing when some people have negative opinions about his job, but at the same time it is encouraging and makes him want to prove them wrong. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Yusuke Nakagawa of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Nakagawa works in the team that operates the robotics used to de-contaminate in the reactor buildings. Nakagawa says he wants to contribute to the recovery of Fukushima, and de-contaminating the reactors is the crucial task needed to proceed the reactor decommission, the most important issue of Fukushima Daiichi. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Shuji Hoshi of Toshiba poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Hoshi works on the operation side of the water purification system at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Hoshi says the support of family has been really important as he lives away from home. His motivation is to stabilize the operation rate, in order not to release the contaminated water. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Masaya Uehara of Kajima Corporation poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Uehara of Kajima Corporation works on the project to build the ice wall that blocks the groundwater flow from the mountain side into the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Uehara says It is disappointing when some people have negative opinions about his job, but at the same time it is encouraging and makes him want to prove them wrong. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Kentaro Saga of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Saga works on the ice wall project at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Saga says that he feels a big responsibility working on the ice wall to control the groundwater flow, because no one has done it before, and it cannot fail. Prior to the ice wall project, Saga also led the project to build a gas turbine power plant that substitutes Fukushima Daiichi's electricity production in such short period as three years. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Masahiro Ito of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Ito works for the trouble shooting unit and reports what happens at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant to the government, local government, and local people. Ito tries to communicate with accuracy and speed, and wishes the local people can come back safely to their home as early as possible. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Shinichi Koga of Kajima Corporation poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Koga works on the project to build the ice wall that blocks the groundwater flow from the ocean side into the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Koga says that the difficult part of his jobs is the environment where he has to wear these protective gears, and there are many restrictions and his tasks require him to ask for permissions from the regulation authorities to proceed. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Shuji Hoshi of Toshiba poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Hoshi works on the operation side of the water purification system at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Hoshi says the support of family has been really important as he lives away from home. His motivation is to stabilize the operation rate, in order not to release the contaminated water. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Kei Kobayashi of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Kobayashi works on the water purification system at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Kobayashi says the whole experience has been rewarding as he learns something new every day. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Yasushi Ooishi of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Ooishi works in the team to handle the contaminated water at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclea Power Plant. Oishi says decommission is something his people must do and only his people can do. Oishi wishes the process was quicker, but there are obstacles and his teams cannot do everything as they wish when cooperating with the government officials and local communities. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Eiji Sakata of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Sakata works in the team that oversees the overall safety control in construction sites in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Sakata says the safety control in Fukushima Daiichi is more difficult than other places as they have to memorize everything as they cannot freely take the documents in and out of the site, and the verbal communication is harder as the workers are always wearing masks. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Mitsuyoshi Sato of Toshiba poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Sato works in the team that operates the vacuum-cleaner-like robots that de-contaminate the reactor No. 2 and No. 3 at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Sato has been working in Fukushima for five years as he voluntarily offered to move to Fukushima to do research on water purification five months after the accident, and once that project is settled, again offered to continue in the decontamination project. Sato says he is too busy to think about the meaning of his job, and he has other things that he wants to work on as a researcher, but he feels his job is something that has to be done now. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Yasushi Ooishi of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Ooishi works in the team to handle the contaminated water at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclea Power Plant. Oishi says decommission is something his people must do and only his people can do. Oishi wishes the process was quicker, but there are obstacles and his teams cannot do everything as they wish when cooperating with the government officials and local communities. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Kenji Shimizu of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Shimizu is the onsite supervisor for the robotics project to investigate the containment vessels to locate the fuel debris in the reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Shimizu says they make sure to work in the safe environment, so he rarely feels any danger working at the Fukushima Daiichi, but feels it is difficult for people to understand. He feels they need to continue making progress safely. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Akira Ono, the Fukuhima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Chief of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Ono says he takes pride in his work. His job is very difficult but his team works hard towards the decommission of the reactors for the recovery of Fukushima, and works safely not to worry the society and people in Fukushima. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Hideaki Tokuma of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Tokuma manages the contaminated water tanks at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Tokuma says he feels his job is challenging and rewarding. Tokuma says there is no routine work and every issue is new, and it is as though finding a way, laying the railway and operating a train all on his own. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Shuji Hoshi of Toshiba poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Hoshi works on the operation side of the water purification system at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Hoshi says the support of family has been really important as he lives away from home. His motivation is to stabilize the operation rate, in order not to release the contaminated water. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Eiji Sakata of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Sakata works in the team that oversees the overall safety control in construction sites in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Sakata says the safety control in Fukushima Daiichi is more difficult than other places as they have to memorize everything as they cannot freely take the documents in and out of the site, and the verbal communication is harder as the workers are always wearing masks. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Kenji Shimizu of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Shimizu is the onsite supervisor for the robotics project to investigate the containment vessels to locate the fuel debris in the reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Shimizu says they make sure to work in the safe environment, so he rarely feels any danger working at the Fukushima Daiichi, but feels it is difficult for people to understand. He feels they need to continue making progress safely. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Akira Ono, the Fukuhima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Chief of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Ono says he takes pride in his work. His job is very difficult but his team works hard towards the decommission of the reactors for the recovery of Fukushima, and works safely not to worry the society and people in Fukushima. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Isao Abe of Kajima Corporation poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Abe works on the ice walls to block the groundwater flow from the sides into the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Ever since the disaster happened, his colleagues in his team was assigned to work in the Fukushima Daiichi, so Abe knew that his turn would come soon or later. Abe feels it is such an important job. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Kenji Shimizu of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Shimizu is the onsite supervisor for the robotics project to investigate the containment vessels to locate the fuel debris in the reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Shimizu says they make sure to work in the safe environment, so he rarely feels any danger working at the Fukushima Daiichi, but feels it is difficult for people to understand. He feels they need to continue making progress safely. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Eiji Sakata of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Sakata works in the team that oversees the overall safety control in construction sites in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Sakata says the safety control in Fukushima Daiichi is more difficult than other places as they have to memorize everything as they cannot freely take the documents in and out of the site, and the verbal communication is harder as the workers are always wearing masks. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Shinichi Koga of Kajima Corporation poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Koga works on the project to build the ice wall that blocks the groundwater flow from the ocean side into the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Koga says that the difficult part of his jobs is the environment where he has to wear these protective gears, and there are many restrictions and his tasks require him to ask for permissions from the regulation authorities to proceed. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Kazuyuki Ogaki of Toshiba poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Ogaki supervises the radiation dose of workers at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Ogaki is a Fukushima local, and his children have not been able to go back to the house where they grew up ever since the accident. Ogaki wants to work at Fukushima Daiichi at least until they can go back to their hometown. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Mitsuyoshi Sato of Toshiba poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Sato works in the team that operates the vacuum-cleaner-like robots that de-contaminate the reactor No. 2 and No. 3 at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Sato has been working in Fukushima for five years as he voluntarily offered to move to Fukushima to do research on water purification five months after the accident, and once that project is settled, again offered to continue in the decontamination project. Sato says he is too busy to think about the meaning of his job, and he has other things that he wants to work on as a researcher, but he feels his job is something that has to be done now. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Kazuyuki Ogaki of Toshiba poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Ogaki supervises the radiation dose of workers at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Ogaki is a Fukushima local, and his children have not been able to go back to the house where they grew up ever since the accident. Ogaki wants to work at Fukushima Daiichi at least until they can go back to their hometown. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Yasushi Ooishi of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Ooishi works in the team to handle the contaminated water at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclea Power Plant. Oishi says decommission is something his people must do and only his people can do. Oishi wishes the process was quicker, but there are obstacles and his teams cannot do everything as they wish when cooperating with the government officials and local communities. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Akira Ono, the Fukuhima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Chief of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Ono says he takes pride in his work. His job is very difficult but his team works hard towards the decommission of the reactors for the recovery of Fukushima, and works safely not to worry the society and people in Fukushima. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
OKUMA, JAPAN - FEBRUARY 23: Yusuke Nakagawa of TEPCO poses for a portrait on February 23, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Nakagawa works in the team that operates the robotics used to de-contaminate in the reactor buildings. Nakagawa says he wants to contribute to the recovery of Fukushima, and de-contaminating the reactors is the crucial task needed to proceed the reactor decommission, the most important issue of Fukushima Daiichi. March 11, 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which claimed the lives of 15,894, and the subsequent damage to the reactors at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant causing the nuclear disaster which still forces 99,750 people to live as evacuees away from the contaminated areas. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
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HUNTING BOAR

Namie, which used to have six grade schools and three middle schools, plans to eventually open a joint elementary-junior high school. So children will need to commute to schools elsewhere initially.

A hospital opens later this month, staffed with one full-time and several part-time doctors.

Reconstruction efforts may create some jobs. The town's mayor, Tamotsu Baba, hopes to draw research and robotics firms.

Prospects for business are not exactly bright in the short term, but lumber company president Munehiro Asada said he restarted his factory in the town to help drive its recovery.

"Sales barely reach a tenth of what they used to be," he said. "But running the factory is my priority. If no one returns, the town will just disappear."

Shoichiro Sakamoto, 69, has an unusual job: hunting wild boars encroaching on residential areas in nearby Tomioka. His 13-man squad catches the animals in a trap before finishing them off with air rifles.

"Wild boars in this town are not scared of people these days," he said. "They stare squarely at us as if saying, 'What in the world are you doing?' It's like our town has fallen under wild boars' control."

Some former Namie residents say the evacuation orders should remain until radiation levels recede and the dismantling of the ruined nuclear plant has advanced.

But it is now or never for his town, Mayor Baba believes.

"Six long years have passed. If the evacuation is prolonged further, people's hearts will snap," he said. "The town could go completely out of existence."

(Reporting by Kiyoshi Takenaka and Teppei Kasai: Editing by Malcolm Foster and Clarence Fernandez)

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