Jeff Sessions had strong feelings on lying under oath in 1999

Embattled Attorney General Jeff Sessions was a key proponent of prosecuting then-President Bill Clinton for allegedly lying under oath in 1999.

Sessions recused himself from any investigation into Russian meddling in the U.S. election on Thursday.

But he remains under fire for failing to disclose at his January confirmation hearing that he twice met with the Russian ambassador to the U.S. during last year's presidential campaign.

Dozens of Democrats — including House Minority leader Nancy Pelosi — have accused Sessions of lying under oath and called for his resignation.

RELATED: Protests against Jeff Sessions

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The @NAACP & @AlabamaNAACP are occupying the Mobile office of @jeffsessions--untill he withdraws as a AG nominee or… https://t.co/o4PGrGAfBU

People for the American Way hold a protest in Upper Senate Park against the nomination of Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., as Donald Trump's Attorney General on Friday, Nov. 18, 2016.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

 A legal, nonviolent demonstration was held in front of Trump Soho Hotel denouncing Trump's installation of white nationalists, racists and Islamophobes in his administration--foremost Steve Bannon, Jeff Sessions and Michael Flynn.

(Photo by Erik McGregor/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images)

People for the American Way hold a protest in Upper Senate Park against the nomination of Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., as Donald Trump's Attorney General on Friday, Nov. 18, 2016.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A legal, nonviolent demonstration was held in front of Trump Soho Hotel denouncing Trump's installation of white nationalists, racists and Islamophobes in his administration--foremost Steve Bannon, Jeff Sessions and Michael Flynn.

(Photo by Erik McGregor/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images)

A legal, nonviolent demonstration was held in front of Trump Soho Hotel denouncing Trump's installation of white nationalists, racists and Islamophobes in his administration--foremost Steve Bannon, Jeff Sessions and Michael Flynn. \

(Photo by Erik McGregor/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images)

People for the American Way hold a protest in Upper Senate Park against the nomination of Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., as Donald Trump's Attorney General on Friday, Nov. 18, 2016.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A member of the activist group Code Pink (C) demonstrates during Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL) speech on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. 

(Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)

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Richard Painter, who served as the chief White House ethics lawyer for President George W. Bush from 2005 to 2007, also made his opinion clear on Twitter late Wednesday.

But Sessions was on the other side of the coin when Clinton was accused of perjury over statements he made regarding his relationship with Monica Lewinsky.

"I am concerned about a president under oath being alleged to have committed perjury," Sessions said on C-SPAN in 1999. "I hope he (Clinton) can rebut that and prove that did not happen. I hope he can show he did not commit obstruction of justice and that he can complete his term.

He added: "But there are serious allegations that that occurred. And in America, the Supreme Court and the American people believe that no one is above the law. The president has gotten himself into this fix that is very serious. I intend to give him an absolutely fair trial."

President Donald Trump said Thursday that Sessions could have been "more accurate" regarding testimony at his confirmation hearing but that he "did not say anything wrong."

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