An American man is claiming to be the rightful King of England

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LONDON — A man from the US has taken out a giant ad in The Times of London claiming to be the rightful king of England.

Allan V. Evans of Colorado says he is a descendant of a royal Welsh line from the third century.

The ad, shown below in a tweet, says Evans is "a direct descendant of an unbroken primogeniture line legally documented since the 3rd century in Great Britain and registered in the Royal College of Arms."

It goes on to describe generations of lineage, starting with a claim that Evans is the descendant of Cunedda Wledig, the founder of the Kingdom of Wales.

Evans is giving "legal notice" to all of his relatives, according to the ad, and in 30 days plans to claim his "royal historic estate," as well as land, assets, and titles.

But Evans will not claim his right to the throne until the death of Queen Elizabeth II.

He "shall further pursue an injustice of history by claiming by right the throne and sovereign crown of Great Britain at Westminster, upon whence the sad future death of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, as he will not out of greatest and most deepest respect despose her in life for the great service and selfless sacrifice that she and her husband HRH Prince Philip has rendered to this great nation."

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Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II on June 2, 1953
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Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II on June 2, 1953
The royal carriage of Queen Elizabeth II passes along Victoria Embankment on its way to Westminster Abbey, on June 02, 1953, during the ceremony of coronation of the Queen. The Queen was solemnly crowned at Westminster Abbey in London. (Photo credit should read -/AFP/Getty Images)
Queen Elizabeth II poses with the royal sceptre 02 June 1953 after being crowned solemnly at Westminter Abbey in London. Elizabeth was proclaimed Queen in 1952 at age 25. (Photo credit should read STF/AFP/Getty Images)
(FILES) Britain's Queen Elizabeth II (L) accompanied by Prince Philip waves to the crowd, 02 June 1953, after being crowned solemnly at Westminter Abbey in London. Queen Elizabeth II was set Thursday 20 December 2007, to become the oldest monarch, overtaking her great-great grandmother Queen Victoria amid signs the royal family is preparing for life after 81-year-old 'Lillibet'. Victoria died in 1901 aged 81 years and 243 days, and Elizabeth will mark passing the milestone with neither pomp nor ceremony, spending the day as usual with her husband of 60 years, Prince Philip. AFP PHOTO/FILES (Photo credit should read STRINGER/AFP/Getty Images)
Queen's Guards marching along Pall Mall as part of Queen Elizabeth II's Coronation procession, London, 2nd June 1953. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
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It goes on: "Take heed and rejoice, all Welshman, Scots, Manx, all Britons, and all citizens of this great nation called Great Britain, that the light of freedom and egalitarianism shall be promoted and promulgated, that democracy and all democratic values will be promoted, and that Lady Britania who has contributed so much to the culture and history of the world shall be renewed and made great once again; for the legend was not a myth but was indeed true, and more than a mere Tolkien story, that the men of the West are now returning and now is the time of the return of the King."

According to The Independent, a man called Allan V. Evans from Wheat Ridge, Colorado, attempted to claim 400 acres of land in Georgia's Twiggs County in 2012, claiming that his ancestors had lived there. He said his evidence was destroyed in a fire at the county courthouse in 1901.

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