Rachel Dolezal is now 'jobless and living on food stamps'

Rachel Dolezal is now reportedly on the verge of homelessness, as she does not have a job and has been relying on food stamps.

In an interview with The Guardian ahead of the publication of her memoir, In Full Color, Dolezal stated that despite her current situation, she was "not going to stoop and apologise and grovel" for the events that led up to her being fired from her job at the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

NAACP leader outed as white, Rachel Dolezal

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NAACP leader outed as white, Rachel Dolezal
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NAACP leader outed as white, Rachel Dolezal
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Washington state civil rights advocate Rachel Dolezal is seen in the NBC's "Today" show studios in Manhattan, New York June 16, 2015. Dolezal, who has been accused of falsely claiming she is African-American, said on Tuesday she identifies as black and has been doing so since she was 5 years of age. Dolezal, in an interview on NBC's "Today" television show, said a major shift in her identity came when she was doing human rights work in Idaho and newspaper stories described her as transracial, biracial and black. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
Washington state civil rights advocate Rachel Dolezal (R) hugs family member Izaiah Dolezal after her interview on the NBC's "Today" show studios in Manhattan, New York June 16, 2015. Dolezal, who has been accused of falsely claiming she is African-American, said on Tuesday she identifies as black and has been doing so since she was 5 years of age. Dolezal, in an interview on NBC's "Today" television show, said a major shift in her identity came when she was doing human rights work in Idaho and newspaper stories described her as transracial, biracial and black. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
Washington state civil rights advocate Rachel Dolezal (C) smiles toward family member Izaiah Dolezal (L) while her son Franklin (R) stands nearby after her interview on the NBC's "Today" show studios in Manhattan, New York June 16, 2015. Dolezal, who has been accused of falsely claiming she is African-American, said on Tuesday she identifies as black and has been doing so since she was 5 years of age. Dolezal, in an interview on NBC's "Today" television show, said a major shift in her identity came when she was doing human rights work in Idaho and newspaper stories described her as transracial, biracial and black. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
People cheer during a protest in front of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) headquarters in Spokane, Washington June 15, 2015. Rachel Dolezal, a civil rights advocate who has been accused of falsely claiming she is black, announced her resignation on Monday as leader of a local branch of the NAACP in Washington state. REUTERS/David Ryder
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When asked by The Guardian if she felt she had done anything wrong by being untruthful about her race, Dolezal insisted, "No, I don't. I don't think you can do something wrong with your identity if you're living in your authenticity and I am. If I thought it was wrong, I would admit it."

SEE ALSO: Rachel Dolezal to be featured at North Carolina MLK celebration

In her memoir, which was turned down by 30 publishing houses before she finally found one that was willing to print it, Dolezal said that she hopes to "open up this dialogue about race and identity, and to just encourage people to be exactly who they are."

She said that she hopes the book will "set the record straight" about her past and her upbringing.

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