Report: France's far-right candidate gains ground

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French presidential candidate Marine Le Pen, who represents the far-right National Front party, continues to gain in the polls, according to the Express.

The news outlet cites an Opinionway survey with 26 percent supporting her in the first round compared to 23 percent and 21 percent for rivals Emmanuel Macron and Francois Fillon, respectively.

The two men have reportedly been struggling with controversies — Macron with comments on colonization and Fillon with potentially criminal allegations involving his family.

Despite projections that one of them will still likely beat Le Pen in the final race, some observers have pointed out that pro-nationalistic events including Brexit and the election of U.S. President Donald Trump could help to improve her chances.

According to The Atlantic, "Le Pen envisions a France with closed borders, its own currency, and tough immigration controls; a country that is independent of international bodies like NATO, and one that ultimately puts itself first."

Should she win, Citi has warned that the country could face economic instability, particularly given a possible exit from the European Union, notes CNBC.

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scandal creates anti-establishment feelings in France
Stephane Dominois, 46, holds a blackboard with the word "logement" (housing), the most important election issue for him, as he poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. He said: "Everybody has the right to live, but when it comes to housing, French people must have priority." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe
Patricia Breard, 53, a nurse, holds a blackboard with the words "avenir des jeunes" (future for young people), the most important election issue for her, as she poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. She said: "Today I wouldn't want to have kids. I'd be too worried about their future." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Kevin Ndongala, 22, a student, holds a blackboard with the word "social", the most important election issue for him, as he poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. He said: "I hear many candidates saying we have too many public sector workers in France, but that's not true. We need them all." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Marie-Laure Mathonnat, 54, a public sector worker, holds a blackboard with the word "ecologie" (ecology), the most important election issue for her, as she poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. She said: "I have always voted, but this time, really, I don't think I'll go. I'm fed up with politics. I don't believe in it anymore." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Marie-Francoise Lagente, 77, retired, holds a blackboard with the word "integration", the most important election issue for her, as she poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. She said: "There are some factors that mean you will always be a foreigner if you leave your country. I love to travel, but I don't believe we can accept everybody coming to our country." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Mehdi Belhabassi, 21, a shop assistant, holds a blackboard with the word "unite" (unity), the most important election issue for him, as he poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. He said: "It's important for us to live together in peace and respect each other. No matter where we come from, we're all French and we're all equal." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Jean-Claude P, 68, retired, holds a blackboard with the word "paix" (peace), the most important election issue for him, as he poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. He said: "I dream of a politician that would give us work and peace. Peace in the world, that's the most important thing." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Nathalie Harlingue, 41, a school teacher, holds a blackboard with the word "education", the most important election issue for her, as she poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Francois Dore, 83, retired, holds a blackboard with the word "sante" (health), the most important election issue for him, as he poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. He said: "I have a toothache, and I couldn't find a dentist." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Jean-Luc Pfister, 57, a social worker, holds a blackboard with the word "solidarite" (solidarity), the most important election issue for him, as he poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. He said: "We need more of that. The gap between the superrich and the rest of us is far too wide." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Jean-Louis Lachevre, 66, holds a blackboard with the word "integrite" (integrity), the most important election issue for him, as he poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. He said: "Our politicians are more or less the same. There aren't many with clean hands." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Malika Etchekopar-Etchart, 38, unemployed, holds a blackboard with the word "chomage" (unemployment), the most important election issue for her, as she poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. She said: "It's more and more difficult to find a job. A few years back, it was a lot easier." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Julien Ambrosio, 27, a salesman, holds a blackboard with the word "confiance" (trust), the most important election issue for him, as he poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. He said: "We must be able to trust our politicians, but that's more and more difficult with what's going on at the moment." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Maurice Beauzac, 86, retired, holds a blackboard with the word "integrite" (integrity), the most important election issue for him, as he poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. He said: "When a politician tells you he's honest, you'd like to believe him, but you can't judge a book by its cover." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Jean-Louis Granjon, 63, retired, holds a blackboard with the word "integrite" (integrity), the most important election issue for him, as he poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Cathy Dos Santos, 21, unemployed, holds a blackboard with the word "honnetete" (honesty), the most important election issue for her, as she poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. She said: "Being honest means voting according to your own feelings and not letting others tell you what you should do." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Bruno Sauvage, 52, unemployed, holds a blackboard with the word "corruption", the most important election issue for him, as he poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. He said: "Politicians give us lessons, but they'd better look at themselves in a mirror." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Christophe Rouze, 58, an actor, holds a blackboard with the word "integrite" (integrity), the most important election issue for him, as he poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. He said: "Politicians ask us to trust them, but we feel like the fall guys in a big farce." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Jacques Gioanetti, 68, retired, holds a blackboard with the word "honnetete" (honesty), the most important election issue for him, as he poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. He said: "In politics today, it's one for all, all rotten. Promises are made but never kept." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Nathalie Reperant, 45, an insurance company employee, holds a blackboard with the word "chomage" (unemployment), the most important election issue for her, as she poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. She said: "Without a job and money, you're on your way to hell." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Francoise Fichet, 69, retired, holds a blackboard with the word "chomage" (unemployment), the most important election issue for her, as she poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. She said: "I don't hear anything extraordinary from our politicians even if some of their proposals do make sense." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Richard Martinez, 40, holds a blackboard with the word "emploi" (employment), the most important election issue for him, as he poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. He said: "The social climate is getting more and more difficult, even in developed countries in the western world." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Nicolas Leroy, 29, a commercial employee, holds a blackboard with the phrase "baisse du chomage" (lowering unemployment), the most important election issue for him, as he poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. He said: "The most important thing in our society is jobs. If you have one, you're alright. If you don't, you're in deep trouble." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Bruno Grausem, 44, a sales representative, holds a blackboard with the phrase "pouvoir d'achat" (purchasing power), the most important election issue for him, as he poses for Reuters in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. He said: "I would love for people to be able to buy something from me without having to ask me a thousand questions." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
A person sticks to a board a note showing the election issue that is most important to them, in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Stephane Cordier, First Federal Secretary of the Eure-et-Loir department Socialist Party, poses for a photograph at the Socialist Party local offices in Mainvilliers, near Chartres, France February 2, 2017. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Aleksandar Nikolic, Secretary of the National Front (FN) Eure-et-Loir department committee, poses for a photograph at the FN local offices, in Luce, near Chartres, France February 2, 2017. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
A portrait of Marie Le Pen hangs on the wall at a Front National office in Luce, near Chartres, France February 2, 2017. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
Jean-Pierre Gorges, mayor of Chartres, poses for a photograph in his office at City Hall in Chartres, France February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe 
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