Trans woman in running for 'Military Spouse of the Year'

At the same time that President Donald Trump rolls back protections for transgender students, one couple is proudly breaking boundaries for trans members of the military.

Laila Ireland, a transgender woman and Army veteran, has been nominated as Peterson Air Force Base's representative in the annual Military Spouse of the Year competition, hosted by Military Spouse Magazine. Ireland is married to a transgender man, Senior Airman Logan Ireland, and they are stationed together at Peterson AFB in Colorado Springs. The couple first gained prominence in 2015, when the New York Times produced a mini-documentary on Senior Airman Ireland titled "Transgender, at War and in Love." Later that month they attended the White House's LGBT Pride reception.

Laila served as an Army combat medic for 13 years before her retirement in December of 2015. Since then she has worked to advocate for trans members of the military, winning the Military Spouse Leadership award from the Military Partner Association in May 2016. She now works with SPART*A Trans, an association for active service trans soldiers. Ireland told Military Spouse that, if chosen, she would use her title to help raise awareness, " and to help educate other families of the opportunities that can form when being diverse and inclusive to all cultures."

The Military Spouse of the Year event has been held for nine years as a way for military families to network with people and the organizations that support them, while honoring the outstanding commitment that some spouses display toward the military family community. Nominees representing dozens of bases from every branch of the service compete for the title, with around 1,500 spouses nominated every year.

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Protests for and against gender-neutral bathrooms
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Protests for and against gender-neutral bathrooms

A sign protesting a recent North Carolina law restricting transgender bathroom access is seen in the bathroom stalls at the 21C Museum Hotel in Durham, North Carolina May 3, 2016.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Drake)

A man holds up a sign supporting North Carolina's anti-transgender bathroom law following Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump' campaign rally in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S., August 18, 2016.

(REUTERS/Carlo Allegri)

Opponents of North Carolina's HB2 law limiting bathroom access for transgender people protest in the gallery above the state's House of Representatives chamber as the legislature considers repealing the controversial law in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S. on December 21, 2016.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Drake)

Civil rights leader Reverend William Barber, president of the NAACP in North Carolina, speaks to the media inside the state's Legislative Building as lawmakers gather to consider repealing the controversial HB2 law limiting bathroom access for transgender people in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S. on December 21, 2016.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Drake)

A gender-neutral bathroom is seen at the University of California, Irvine in Irvine, California September 30, 2014. The University of California will designate gender-neutral restrooms at its 10 campuses to accommodate transgender students, in a move that may be the first of its kind for a system of colleges in the United States.

(REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)

Transgender people and their supporters have been fighting for repeal of House Bill 2, a North Carolina law that requires people in government buildings to use the bathroom of the gender on their birth certificate.

(John D. Simmons/Charlotte Observer/TNS via Getty Images)

Protestors gather across the street from the North Carolina state legislative building as they voice their concerns over House Bill 2, in Raleigh, N.C., Monday, May 16, 2016. House Bill 2, also known as the Bathroom Bill, which requires transgender people to use the public restroom matching the sex on their birth certificate, has received the attention of national media and the White House.

(Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Protestors gather across the street from the North Carolina state legislative building as they voice their concerns over House Bill 2, in Raleigh, N.C., Monday, May 16, 2016. House Bill 2, also known as the Bathroom Bill, which requires transgender people to use the public restroom matching the sex on their birth certificate, has received the attention of national media and the White House.

(Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Supporter of HB2 Lee Churchill from Raleigh, N.C. holds a sign stating her position outside the North Carolina House and Senate chambers gallery on Wednesday, Dec. 21, 2016 as the North Carolina General Assembly convenes for a special session at the Legislative Building in Raleigh, N.C.

(Chris Seward/Raleigh News & Observer/TNS via Getty Images)

Transgender activists and supporters protest potential changes by the Trump administration in federal guidelines issued to public schools in defense of transgender student rights, near the White House in Washington, U.S. February 22, 2017.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Transgender activists and supporters protest potential changes by the Trump administration in federal guidelines issued to public schools in defense of transgender student rights, near the White House in Washington, U.S. February 22, 2017.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Transgender activists and supporters protest potential changes by the Trump administration in federal guidelines issued to public schools in defense of transgender student rights, near the White House in Washington, U.S. February 22, 2017.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

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The post Trans Woman In Running For 'Military Spouse Of The Year' appeared first on Vocativ.

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