Mexico says it 'will not accept' Trump's new immigration plans, and it could retaliate

This week, the Trump administration detailed new immigration plans that would expand the pool of immigrants eligible for deportation and offer more resources to agencies in charge of the crackdown.

The new plans would also see the US deport immigrants to the country from which they arrived, regardless of their country of origin.

This has aroused the ire of Mexican officials, who have worked closely with the US government in recent years to intercept migrants flowing through the country toward the US-Mexico border.

Luis Videgaray, the Mexican foreign minister, said on Wednesday that his government "will not accept" the US's new, "unilateral" immigration proposals.

22 PHOTOS
Inside a migrant shelter on the US-Mexico border
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Inside a migrant shelter on the US-Mexico border
Migrant Jeber Hernandez, 14, from El Salvador, who hopes to make it to Los Angeles, stands in the chapel at the Juan Bosco migrant shelter in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, February 1, 2017. Picture taken February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Migrants eat dinner at the Juan Bosco migrant shelter in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, February 1, 2017. Picture taken February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Gilda Loureiro, who runs the Juan Bosco migrant shelter, cooks meals for migrants, in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, February 1, 2017. Picture taken February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Migrants eat dinner at the Juan Bosco migrant shelter in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, February 1, 2017. Picture taken February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
The bag of a seven-year-old Honduran migrant, whose family members fear for their lives, is seen at the Juan Bosco migrant shelter where they are staying before attempting to cross the border to the U.S., in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, February 1, 2017. Picture taken February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Haitian migrant Volter Petiblen, 24, (R) reads his phone at the Juan Bosco migrant shelter in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, February 1, 2017. Picture taken February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Mexican migrant Sergio Medrano, 30, sits in the chapel at the Juan Bosco migrant shelter after being deported from the U.S., in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, February 1, 2017. Picture taken February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Mexican migrant Jose Angel Garcia, 42, holds a crucifix he made as he waits at the Juan Bosco migrant shelter after being deported from the U.S. following two years in an immigration detention center, in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, February 1, 2017. Picture taken February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Gilda Loureiro, who runs the Juan Bosco migrant shelter, stands in one of the shelter's dormitories, in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, February 1, 2017. Picture taken February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
A migrant talks to his family at the Juan Bosco migrant shelter in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, February 1, 2017. Picture taken February 1, 2017 REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Migrant Jever Danilo, 14, from El Salvador, who hopes to make it to Los Angeles, stands in the chapel at the Juan Bosco migrant shelter in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, February 1, 2017. Picture taken February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Migrants arrive at the Juan Bosco migrant shelter after being deported from the U.S., in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, February 1, 2017. Picture taken February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Rosary beads left by migrants are seen in the chapel at the Juan Bosco migrant shelter in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, February 1, 2017. Picture taken February 1, 2017 REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Haitian migrant Volter Petiblen, 24, looks out at Nogalas from the Juan Bosco migrant shelter in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, February 1, 2017. Picture taken February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Mexican migrant Jose Angel Garcia, 42, shows a photo of his mother as he waits at the Juan Bosco migrant shelter after being deported from the U.S. following two years in an immigration detention center, in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, February 1, 2017. Picture taken February 1, 2017 REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Mexican migrant Jaime Manuel Perez Mancinas, 31, holds the hand of a three-year-old Honduran refugee as he waits at the Juan Bosco migrant shelter after being deported from the U.S. following two years in an immigration detention center, in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, February 1, 2017. Picture taken February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Religious keepsakes left by migrants are seen in the chapel at the Juan Bosco migrant shelter in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, February 1, 2017. Picture taken February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Haitian migrant Volter Petiblen, 24, (R) waits for dinner at the Juan Bosco migrant shelter in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, February 1, 2017. Picture taken February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
The Juan Bosco migrant shelter is seen in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, February 1, 2017. Picture taken February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Religious keepsakes left by migrants are seen in the chapel at the Juan Bosco migrant shelter in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, February 1, 2017. Picture taken February 1, 2017 REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Haitian migrant Volter Petiblen, 24, reads his phone at a the Juan Bosco migrant shelter in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, February 1, 2017. Picture taken February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
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The statement that came just hours before Videgaray was slated to meet with US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and US Department of Homeland Security chief John Kelly. He said the new proposals would be the main point of discussion during their meetings on Wednesday and Thursday.

Tillerson and Kelly are in Mexico to meet with high-level Mexican officials, including President Enrique Peña Nieto.

Videgaray also said the Mexican government wouldn't hesitate to go to the UN in order "to defend the rights of immigrants," Reuters reported.

The Trump administration has sparred with the Mexican government over immigration since the US president took office in late January.

29 PHOTOS
Historical photos of immigrants traveling through Ellis Island
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Historical photos of immigrants traveling through Ellis Island

An Italian family with their baggage, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

A Slovakian grandmother, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

Newcomers being interviewed, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

A Jewish immigrant, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

An immigrant family, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

Immigrants climbing stairs, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

A Jewish grandmother, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

A group of immigrants, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

Slavic mothers with a child, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

A family of seven sons and one daughter, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

A Slavic immigrant, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

A woman and two children, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

An immigrant woman, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

Deported Hungarian gypsies in 1905.

(Photo by Augustus Sherman via the New York Public Library)

(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
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The two countries have long cooperated on immigration issues, with Mexico acting — with US assistance — to pick up migrants from Central America and other countries who pass through southern Mexico on their way to the US's southern border, where many intend to claim asylum.

This initiative has earned the Mexican government criticism, both for the amount of resources it requires as well as over apparent violations of its obligations as a signatory to an international convention on the rights of migrants and refugees.

The Mexican government has warned that it could rescind its cooperation on immigration and other programs should relations with the US continue to deteriorate.

"We have been a great ally to fight problems with migration, narcotics" Mexican Economy Minister Ildefonso Guajardo told The Globe and Mail this month. "If at some point in time things become so badly managed in the relationship, the incentives for the Mexican people to keep on co-operating in things that are at the heart of [US] national-security issues will be diminished."

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