Marine Le Pen refuses to wear a headscarf in Lebanon


Far-right French presidential candidate Marine Le Pen canceled a meeting with Lebanon's top Sunni cleric after being told she would have to wear a headscarf.

Le Pen was apparently presented with a headscarf when she arrived at the office of Lebanon's grand mufti. She refused to put it on and walked out of the meeting.

15 PHOTOS
Marine Le Pen
See Gallery
Marine Le Pen

France's far-right Presidential candidate Marine Le Pen (C) holds a press conference at a hotel in Beirut, Lebanon on February 21, 2017.

(Photo by Ratib Al Safadi/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Marine Le Pen, French National Front (FN) political party leader and candidate for French 2017 presidential election, shakes hands with Lebanon's President Michel Aoun (R) at the presidential palace in Baabda, Lebanon, February 20, 2017.

(Dalati Nohra/Handout via REUTERS)

France's far-right Presidential candidate Marine Le Pen (R) holds a press conference at a hotel in Beirut, Lebanon on February 21, 2017.

(Photo by Ratib Al Safadi/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Marine Le Pen, French National Front (FN) political party leader and candidate for the French 2017 presidential elections, shakes hands with Cardinal Bechara Boutros Rai of Lebanon, the Maronite Patriarch of Antioch and the Whole Levant, as French deputy Gilbert Collard looks on, in Bkerke, north of Beirut, Lebanon February 21, 2017.

(REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir)

Marine Le Pen, French National Front (FN) political party leader and candidate for French 2017 presidential election, rejects a headscarf for her meeting Lebanon's Grand Mufti Sheikh Abed el-Lateef Daryan in Beirut, Lebanon February 21, 2017.

(REUTERS/Aziz Taher)

French journalists and television hosts David Pujadas (C), Lea Salame (L) and French presidential election candidate for the far-right Front National (FN) party Marine Le Pen (R) pose prior to take part in the show 'L'Emission politique', in the studios of French television channel France 2 in Saint-Cloud, west of Paris, on January 9, 2017. / AFP / Thomas SAMSON (Photo credit should read THOMAS SAMSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Marine Le Pen, French National Front (FN) political party leader and candidate for the French 2017 presidential election, attends the 2-day FN political rally to launch the presidential campaign in Lyon, France February 5, 2017.

(REUTERS/Robert Pratta)

French far-right Front National (FN) party president, member of European Parliament and candidate for French 2017 presidential election, Marine Le Pen (C) stands next to a man dressed as a Santa Claus and French National Front (FN) vice-president Florian Philippot (R) as she visits a Christmas market in Paris, France, December 8, 2016.

(REUTERS/Benoit Tessier)

Marine Le Pen, French National Front (FN) political party leader and candidate for French 2017 presidential election, looks at French deputy Gilbert Collard as she speaks during a news conference at a hotel in Beirut, Lebanon February 21, 2017.

(REUTERS/Jamal Saidi)

BEIRUT, LEBANON - FEBRUARY 20 : Marine Le Pen (R), the leader of France's far-right Front National political party and French MP Gilbert Collard (L) meet with Lebanese President Michel Aoun (not seen) at the government palace in Beirut, Lebanon on February 20, 2017. (Photo by Ratib Al Safadi/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Germany's Alternative for Germany (AfD) leader Frauke Petry and France's National Front leader Marine Le Pen (R) arrive for a European far-right leaders meeting to discuss about the European Union, in Koblenz, Germany, January 21, 2017.

(REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay)

TOPSHOT - French presidential election candidate for the far-right Front National (FN) party Marine Le Pen waves as she walks on the beach during her visit in Nice, southeastern France, on February 13, 2017. / AFP / VALERY HACHE (Photo credit should read VALERY HACHE/AFP/Getty Images)

Marine Le Pen, French National Front (FN) political party leader, poses near a horse as she visits the Horse show in Villepinte, France, December 2, 2016.

(REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen)

LYON, FRANCE - FEBRUARY 04: French far right National Front (FN) political party's leader, Member of the European Parliament, and candidate for the 2017 French Presidential Election Marine Le Pen delivers a speech during her meeting at the occasion of her 'Assises de la pr�identielle' at the Cite internationale on February 4, 2017 in Lyon, France. Nearly 3000 supporters came to listen the political program of Marine Le Pen titled '144 Presidential Commitments'. (Photo by Aurelien Morissard/IP3/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Female non-Muslim dignitaries have occasionally opted to cover their heads while working in Muslim-majority countries. Sweden's trade minister was recently criticized for wearing a veil during a state trip to Iran.

SEE MORE: France's Rising Political Star Wants America's Best Minds

But Le Pen's brand of nationalism has put her at odds with the Islamic garb. She previously vowed to ban all religious symbols in public if elected president.

Le Pen is currently projected to earn enough votes to survive the first round of France's presidential elections on April 23. She's not predicted to win a runoff, but the polls have been tightening in recent weeks.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.