21-year-old man cremated in giant Lego brick

Losing a loved one is never easy, but they'd always want you to remember their bright personality and sense of humor. A family of a 21-year-old man had that very intention when choosing his coffin.

Reddit user helypants shared the coffin for the deceased, Jordan McCole:

If you've lost a loved one, please know that you have options to say goodbye outside of the norm. Options to express the personality and humour of the one you've lost. Today, we said goodbye to a 21 year old man in a Lego brick... from pics

"If you've lost a loved one, please know that you have options to say goodbye outside of the norm," they wrote. "Options to express personality and humor of the one you've lost."

"Today, we said goodbye to a 21-year-old man in a Lego brick."

McCole was helypant's boyfriend's cousin. He suffered leukemia, but according to helypants, "He wouldn't want to be defined by his condition. It wasn't him. He'd rather we remember him for his love of food, sense of mischief, wanderlust and Lego obsession."

McCole, then, was cremated in a Lego brick as opposed to a traditional coffin. His parents chose this because they believe "goodbyes don't have to be negative."

This is similar to a practice done in Ghana, where people are often buried in a casket shaped to represent something they loved.

Check out some of those coffins:

6 PHOTOS
Ghana caskets
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Ghana caskets
A street vendor passes a coffin made in the shape of a fish at the workshop of Kane Kwei in the Teshi area of Accra, May 16, 2013. From fish-shaped coffins to slaughtered bulls, funerals in Africa are lavish affairs, providing a lucrative opportunity for insurance companies looking for business in some of the world's fastest growing economies. Many of the insurance industry's big money-spinners in developed markets, like motor insurance and cover for household goods, are irrelevant to the majority of Africans who cannot afford a range of expensive personal possessions. But high death rates and low savings levels mean funeral insurance is proving an easier sell among people daunted by the cost of ceremonies that can stretch to several months of income. Picture taken May 16, 2013. REUTERS/Luc Gnago (GHANA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY RELIGION TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
-PHOTO TAKEN 22JAN06- Carpenters carry a coffin shaped in the form of a Ghana Airways aircraft to their showroom in Teshie, a suburb of the Ghanaian capital of Accra, January 22, 2004. Funerals are important [social] occasions in this West African country and elaborate, brightly coloured coffins have become an art form. Picture taken January 22, 2004.
-PHOTO TAKEN 22JAN06- Carpenters lift a coffin shaped in the form of a Coca Cola bottle in Teshie, a suburb of the Ghanaian capital of Accra, January 22, 2004. Funerals are important [social] occasions in this West African country and elaborate, brightly coloured coffins have become an art form. Picture taken January 22, 2004.
Craftsmen in the coastal village of Teshie paint the finishing touches on a chicken shaped coffin, February 10. Designed for those who wish to go out in style, the coffins usually reflect the professions of the deceased. The distinctive coffins are commonly used locally, but are also gaining popularity worldwide amongst collectors.
A craftsman in the coastal village of Teshie offers a way to go out in unique Ghanaian style, with a range of elaborate coffins designed to reflect the professions of the deceased, February 10. The distinctive coffins are commonly used locally, but are also gaining popularity worldwide amongst collectors.
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McCole's family started an online fundraiser in his memory. Proceeds go to The Christie, a charity for cancer research and patients.

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