New reports give preview of Trump's revised travel ban

A revised version of President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration and refugees could be issued as early as Tuesday, according to multiple reports. Muslims look likely to remain its prime target.

Current drafts of the replacement travel ban continue to exclusively single out the same Muslim-majority countries listed in Trump's initial order, which triggered global protests, more than 20 lawsuits nationwide, and ultimately led to federal courts blocking some of the order's key provisions earlier this month.

More Trump Ban Triggers Wave Of Support For America's Mosques

U.S. officials told the Wall Street Journal and Associated Press that the new immigration order, still under review, will exempt green-card holders from the seven countries included in the travel ban as well as those individuals who are dual citizens of the U.S. The revised order will also likely ease a section in the initial ban, signed by Trump on January 27, that indefinitely suspended the entry of Syrian refugees into the U.S, the Journal and AP reported.

Still, the new draft retains the central provision from the original White House order that temporarily suspends travel to the U.S. by citizens from Iraq, Iran, Syria, Libya, Yemen, Somalia and Sudan — all predominately Muslim countries. The Trump administration has said that people from these nations pose a superlative national security threat, a claim that remains unsubstantiated.

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Scenes from US airports after Trump's travel restriction
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Scenes from US airports after Trump's travel restriction
Hossein Khoshbakhty wipes tears from his eyes while speaking during an interview about his Iranian brother, a U.S. Green Card holder effected by the travel ban at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Homa Homaei, a U.S. Citizen from Iran, is embraced by a lawyer working to help her Iranian family members effected by the travel ban at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Port Authority Police Department block an entrance as protesters gather outside Terminal 4 at JFK airport in opposition to U.S. president Donald Trump's proposed ban on immigration in Queens, New York City, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Yang
Attorney Talia Inlender, (C), works on paperwork with lawyers for family members of passengers effected by the travel ban outside of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection office at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Lawyers work on paperwork to help family members of passengers effected by the travel ban outside of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection office at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Demonstrators gather outside of John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) airport to protest U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order blocking visitors from seven predominantly Muslim nations in New York, U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 28, 2017. Friday's executive order suspending refugee resettlements and barring entry to people from seven Middle East nations, is 'not a Muslim ban,' President Trump said. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Lawyers work on paperwork for family members of passengers effected by the travel ban outside of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection office at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Sarah Saedian speaks with an attorney about her Iranian relatives as lawyers work to help family members of passengers effected by the travel ban at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Hossein Khoshbakhty speaks during an interview about his Iranian brother, a U.S. Green Card holder effected by the travel ban at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Hossein Khoshbakhty, (L), speaks with attorney Talia Inlender about his Iranian family members effected by the travel ban as Homa Homaei, (2nd L), looks on outside the U.S. Customs and Border Protection office at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Sarah Saedian holds a bouquet of roses as she speaks with attorneys about her Iranian relatives working to help her family members effected by the travel ban at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Hossein Khoshbakhty speaks during an interview about his Iranian brother, a U.S. Green Card holder effected by the travel ban at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Attorney Talia Inlender, (R), speaks with Hossein Khoshbakhty, (L), and Homa Homaei, family members of Iranian passengers effected by the travel ban at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
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More U.S. Appeals Court Upholds Suspension Of Trump's Immigration Ban

Critics, including two states that successfully sued and blocked the order, have argued that the order amounts to a thinly-veiled attempt at a Muslim ban, an idea repeatedly promoted by Trump and his surrogates before and after the election. To dampen claims that the travel ban amounts to religious discrimination, the new order removes provisions from the original that gave preferences to religious minorities in these countries.

According to a draft, the new travel order will also allow the secretary of state to waive individual cases, which would allow some citizens from the seven countries to enter the U.S. However, those cases would also have to be approved by the Department of Homeland Security, the Wall Street Journal reported.

The post Trump's Revised Travel Ban Still Looks A Lot Like A Muslim Ban appeared first on Vocativ.

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