Monticello to reconstruct room of slave Sally Hemings 

Thomas Jefferson's Virginia home, Monticello, is undergoing a major restoration, reports the Washington Post.

Among the changes underway is a reconstruction of the room that likely belonged to slave Sally Hemings.

Hemings is said to have had as many as six children fathered by Jefferson, notes NPR.

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Monticello -- home of Thomas Jefferson
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Monticello -- home of Thomas Jefferson

Charlottesville, VA

Monticello, home of Thomas Jefferson is working to more fully integrate the stories of the enslaved at the historic plantation, Monday, February 6, 2017.

(Photo by Norm Shafer/ For The Washington Post via Getty Images).

Charlottesville, VA

Visitors to Monticello take a slavery tour Monday, February 6, 2017 at Monticello. At left is t. servant's house a dwelling for an enslaved family. The Hemings family were likely residents of the cabin.

(Photo by Norm Shafer/ For The Washington Post via Getty Images).

Charlottesville, VA

Crystal Ptacek, Archaeological Field Research Manager at Monticello and Craig Kelley, Senior Archeological Field Assistant work on excavating the first kitch, part of the South Dependency at Monticello, Monday, February 6, 2017.

(Photo by Norm Shafer/ For The Washington Post via Getty Images).

Charlottesville, VA

Allison Mueller, an archeologist field assistant sifts dirt looking for artifacts along the south dependency at Monticello, Monday, February 6, 2017 at Monticello.

(Photo by Norm Shafer/ For The Washington Post via Getty Images).

Charlottesville, VA

Gardens flank Mulberry Row, the industrial hub of Jeffersons Monticello.

(Photo by Norm Shafer/ For The Washington Post via Getty Images).

Charlottesville, VA

Niya Bates, Public Historian of Slavery and African American Life in front of t. servant's house a dwelling for an enslaved family at Monticello, Monday, February 6, 2017.

(Photo by Norm Shafer/ For The Washington Post via Getty Images).

Charlottesville, VA

Fragments of Chinese porcelain are displayed on a sifting screen, Monday, February 6, 2017 at Monticello. They were found in an excavation being done of the first kitchen, part of the South Dependency at Monticello.

(Photo by Norm Shafer/ For The Washington Post via Getty Images).

Charlottesville, VA

Various artigacts are displayed Monday, February 6, 2017 at Monticello. They were found in an excavation being done of the first kitchen, part of the South Dependency at Monticello.

(Photo by Norm Shafer/ For The Washington Post via Getty Images).

Charlottesville, VA

Joshua DuBois, Values Partnership Initiative, Brandon Andrews, Values Partnership Initiative and Crystal Ptacek, Archaeological Field Research Manager at Monticello listen to Fraser D. Neiman, Director of Archaeology at Monticello in the South Wing where archeological excavations are being done to learn more about the lives of the enslaved people at Monticello, Monday, February 6, 2017.

(Photo by Norm Shafer/ For The Washington Post via Getty Images).

Charlottesville, VA

This room, part of the South Dependency of Monticello is going to be restored as the residence of Sally Hemings. Monticello is currently working to more fully integrate the stories of the enslaved at the historic plantation, Tuesday February 6, 2017.

(Photo by Norm Shafer/ For The Washington Post via Getty Images).

Former U.S. President Barack Obama and French President Francois Hollande tour the outside of the Virginia residence of Thomas Jefferson with Leslie Greene Bowman, president and CEO of the Thomas Jefferson foundation, at Monticello in Charlottesville, February 10, 2014. Jefferson was one of the United States' earliest envoys to France.

(REUTERS/Larry Downing)

Former U.S. President Barack Obama and French President Francois Hollande tour the Virginia residence of Thomas Jefferson with Leslie Greene Bowman, president and CEO of the Thomas Jefferson foundation, at Monticello in Charlottesville, February 10, 2014. Jefferson was one of the United States' earliest envoys to France.

(REUTERS/Larry Downing)

Charlottesville VA,

April 23, 2011

President Thomas Jefferson's home, Monticello, with tulips in foreground.

(marcnorman via Getty Images)

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The space in the home believed to be occupied by her was transformed into a bathroom in 1941.

That remodel was part of an effort to downplay her involvement with Jefferson.

The goal this time around is to draw greater attention to Hemings and the other slaves owned by the 3rd U.S. president.

Christa Dierksheide, a historian of Monticello, told the Post, "Visitors will come up here and understand that there was no place on this mountaintop that slavery wasn't. Thomas Jefferson was surrounded by people, and the vast majority of those people were enslaved."

Other efforts towards that end include the rebuilding of a stable and a Mulberry Row workman's house.

Hemings' room is expected to be completed by next year.

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