Kim Jong Nam murder: Video shows moment Kim Jong Un's brother is attacked

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Video released Monday appears to show the moment that Kim Jong Nam was attacked and killed in a Malaysian airport.

The video, first aired by a Japan's Fuji TV, was shot by security cameras inside Kuala Lumpur airport.

It shows a woman coming up behind a man, believed to be Kim, putting her arms over him and apparently pulling something across his face.

RELATED: Photos of Kim Jong Nam

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Kim Jong Nam arrives at Beijing airport in Beijing, China, in this photo taken by Kyodo February 11, 2007.

(Kyodo/via REUTERS)

This combo shows a file photo (L) taken on May 4, 2001 of a man believed to be Kim Jong-Nam, son of the late-North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il, getting off a bus to board an All Nippon Airways plane at Narita airport near Tokyo and a file photo (R) of his half-brother, current North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un, on a balcony of the Grand People's Study House following a mass parade in Pyongyang on May 10, 2016. The half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un, who has been murdered in Malaysia, pleaded for his life after a failed assassination bid in 2012, lawmakers briefed by South Korea's spy chief said on February 15, 2017. Jong-Nam, the eldest son of the late former leader Kim Jong-Il, was once seen as heir apparent but fell out of favor following an embarrassing botched bid in 2001 to enter Japan on a forged passport and visit Disneyland.

(TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA,ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)

A man (R) believed to be North Korean heir-apparent Kim Jong Nam, is escorted by police as he boards a plane upon his deportation from Japan at Tokyo's Narita international airport in Narita, Japan, in this photo taken by Kyodo May 4, 2001. 

(Kyodo/via REUTERS)

A man watches a television showing news reports of Kim Jong-Nam, the half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un, in Seoul on February 14, 2017. Kim Jong-Nam, the half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un has been assassinated in Malaysia, South Korean media reported on February 14.

(JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)

In a picture taken on June 4, 2010 Kim Jong-Nam, the eldest son of North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il, waves after an interview with South Korean media representatives in Macau. Kim Jong-Nam was in the limelight with Seoul's JoongAng Ilbo newspaper carrying a snatched interview with him at a hotel in Macau. Jong-Nam declined knowledge of the warship incident, it reported, and said his father is 'doing well'. North Korean Leader Leader Kim Jong-Il on June 7 attended a rare second annual session of parliament at which Kim's brother-in-law was promoted and the country's prime minister was sacked, state media reported.

(JoongAng Sunday/AFP/Getty Images)

This photo taken on February 11, 2007 shows a man believed to be then-North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il's eldest son, Kim Jong-Nam (C), walking amongst journalists upon his arrival at Beijing's international airport. The half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un, who has been murdered in Malaysia, pleaded for his life after a failed assassination bid in 2012, lawmakers briefed by South Korea's spy chief said on February 15, 2017.

(JIJI PRESS/AFP/Getty Images)

BEIJING, CHINA: A man believed to be the eldest son of North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il, Kim Jong-Nam, answers Japanese reporters' questions at the Beijing International airport, 25 September 2004.

(JIJI PRESS/AFP/Getty Images)

A man believed to be North Korean heir-apparent Kim Jong-nam emerges from a bus as he is escorted by Japanese authorities upon his deportation from Japan at Tokyo's Narita international airport May 4, 2001. Believed to be Kim Jong-nam, eldest son of North Korean leader Kim Jong-il, the man entered Japan with a forged passport on Tuesday, but was deported to China on Friday.

(Eriko Sugita / Reuters)

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Kim, the estranged half-brother of North Korea's supreme leader Kim Jong Un, is then seen talking with airport security personnel, before attending an airport medical clinic.

He was taken from the airport by ambulance after the incident on Feb. 13, but died on the way to hospital.

Malaysian police believe that he was poisoned, and South Korea has said it believes the killing was carried out by North Korean agents.

The killing has set off a diplomatic spat between Malaysia and North Korea. Pyongyang's ambassador has said it will refuse to accept the results of a Malaysian police investigation into Kim's death, accusing authorities of "colluding with outside forces" — a veiled reference to rival South Korea.

Meanwhile, Malaysia has recalled its ambassador from Pyongyang for consultations, and summoned the North Korean ambassador in the country to explain the allegations.

Here's what else we know about the case so far:

  • Two women are alleged to have approached Kim in the airport while he was waiting for a flight and used needles, spray or a chemical-soaked cloth to poison him before fleeing in a taxi. Kim managed to make it to a desk to ask for help but died before reaching the hospital.
  • Late Friday, Malaysian police arrested a North Korean man in connection with the death. They identified him as Ri Jong Chol, 46.
  • That brought the total number of arrests to four.
  • In addition to the North Korean man, two women who are alleged to have carried out the attack — a 28-year-old with Vietnamese travel documents and a 25-year-old with Indonesian documents — have been arrested.
  • A 26-year-old Malaysian man, said by police to be the boyfriend of the Indonesian woman, has been arrested as well.
  • Malaysian police are working with Interpol to locate four more North Koreanssuspected of involvement. They say that the suspects left the country on the day of the incident, but have not yet disclosed where they traveled to.
  • The family of the Indonesian woman, Siti Aishah, says she thought she was going to Malaysia for a prank TV show on which she would surprise people by spraying them with perfume.
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