White House reportedly in a state of 'borderline chaos'

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

The White House has been described as being in a state of "borderline chaos," according to an inside source who spoke with Axios.

The unnamed person has also been quoted as saying by Axios, "Some staff is in survival mode...scared to death."

The turmoil stems, at least in part, from growing evidence that members associated with the Trump team had been communicating with Russia-related operatives during the campaign period.

RELATED: Trump's official picks for senior administration positions

22 PHOTOS
Trump's official picks for Cabinet and administration positions
See Gallery
Trump's official picks for Cabinet and administration positions

Counselor to the President: Kellyanne Conway

REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Veterans Affairs Secretary: David Shulkin

(Photo credit DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)

Transportation secretary: Elaine Chao

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Energy secretary: Rick Perry

(Photo credit KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)

Secretary of State: Rex Tillerson

 REUTERS/Daniel Kramer

Secretary of Defense: Retired Marine General James Mattis

(Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Chief of staff: Reince Priebus

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Chief strategist: Steve Bannon

(EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Attorney General: Senator Jeff Sessions

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Director of the CIA: Kansas Rep. Mike Pompeo

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Deputy national security adviser: K.T. McFarland

(Photo by Michael Schwartz/Getty Images)

White House counsel: Donald McGahn

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Ambassador to the United Nations: South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley

(Photo by Astrid Riecken For The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Education secretary: Betsy DeVos

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Commerce secretary: Wilbur Ross

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Homeland security secretary: General John Kelly

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Housing and urban development secretary: Ben Carson

(Photo credit NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

Administrator of Environmental Protection Agency: Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt

(Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Health and human services secretary: Tom Price

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Department of Homeland Security: Retired General John Kelly

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Secretary of agriculture: Sonny Perdue

(BRYAN R. SMITH/AFP/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

The issue gained more attention following the Monday evening resignation of national security adviser Michael Flynn who, according to the New York Times, was not completely forthcoming about his conversations with the Russian ambassador.

The Trump administration had reportedly even been warned weeks before that these discrepancies could result in Flynn possibly being blackmailed.

RELATED: Michael Flynn and the Russia phone call

SEE ALSO: Trump slams 'fake news' and 'criminal' leaks in wake of Flynn's resignation

In light of this controversy, along with the dismissal of acting attorney general Sally Yates, Axios' source said, "They had to know she was radioactive, and that there would be consequences. It was either reckless, or total incompetence. It leads back to the fact that nobody is in charge."

The piece also points out that numerous government leaks have complicated the situation even further.

Trump himself has complained about inside information going public; the day after Flynn resigned, Trump tweeted, "The real story here is why are there so many illegal leaks coming out of Washington? Will these leaks be happening as I deal on N.Korea etc?"

Then on Wednesday, he reiterated the message, writing, "The real scandal here is that classified information is illegally given out by 'intelligence' like candy. Very un-American!"

RELATED: Poll - Trump's interactions with Russia

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners