Hotels accused of price-gouging during California dam emergency

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

ROCKLIN (KTXL) -- Unloading his car in the parking lot of Rocklin's Heritage Inn Express is not what Ysidro Gonzalez expected to be doing Monday night.

But, thanks to evacuations due to the failing main and emergency spillways for the Oroville dam, that's just where he is.

At least it's better than where he spent Sunday night with his three kids.

See more on the California dam:

27 PHOTOS
Lake Oroville dam -- emergency spillway and evacuation
See Gallery
Lake Oroville dam -- emergency spillway and evacuation
TOPSHOT - The Oroville Dam spillway releases 100,000 cubic feet of water per second down the main spillway in Oroville, California on February 13, 2017. Almost 200,000 people were under evacuation orders in northern California Monday after a threat of catastrophic failure at the United States' tallest dam. Officials said the threat had subsided for the moment as water levels at the Oroville Dam, 75 miles (120 kilometers) north of Sacramento, have eased. But people were still being told to stay out of the area. / AFP / Josh Edelson (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
OROVILLE, CA - JULY 20: In this handout photo provided by the California Department of Water Resources, Full water levels are visible behind the Oroville Dam at Lake Oroville on July 20, 2011 in Oroville, California. (Photo by Paul Hames/California Department of Water Resources via Getty Images)
California Department of Water Resources personnel monitor water flowing through a damaged spillway on the Oroville Dam in Oroville, California, U.S., on February 10, 2017.
FOLSOM, CA - JULY 20: In this handout photo provided by the California Department of Water Resources, Full water levels are visible behind the Folsom Dam at Folsom Lake on July 20, 2011 in El Folsom, California. (Photo by Paul Hames/California Department of Water Resources via Getty Images)
OROVILLE, CA - AUGUST 19: The Oroville Dam spillway stands dry at Lake Oroville on August 19, 2014 in Oroville, California. As the severe drought in California continues for a third straight year, water levels in the State's lakes and reservoirs is reaching historic lows. Lake Oroville is currently at 32 percent of its total 3,537,577 acre feet. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
65,000 cfs of water flow through a damaged spillway on the Oroville Dam in Oroville, California, U.S., February 10, 2017. REUTERS/Max Whittaker
California Department of Water Resources crews inspect and evaluate the erosion just below the Lake Oroville Emergency Spillway site after lake levels receded, in Oroville, California, U.S., February 13, 2017. Kelly M. Grow/ California Department of Water Resources/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY.
California Department of Water Resources personnel monitor water flowing through a damaged spillway on the Oroville Dam in Oroville, California, U.S., on February 10, 2017.
A damaged spillway with eroded hillside is seen in an aerial photo taken over the Oroville Dam in Oroville, California, U.S. February 11, 2017. California Department of Water Resources/William Croyle/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. THIS PICTURE WAS PROCESSED BY REUTERS TO ENHANCE QUALITY. AN UNPROCESSED VERSION HAS BEEN PROVIDED SEPARATELY.
A damaged spillway with eroded hillside is seen in an aerial photo taken over the Oroville Dam in Oroville, California, U.S. February 11, 2017. California Department of Water Resources/William Croyle/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Riverbend Park is seen under flood water in Oroville, California on February 13, 2017. Almost 200,000 people were under evacuation orders in northern California Monday after a threat of catastrophic failure at the United States' tallest dam. Officials said the threat had subsided for the moment as water levels at the Oroville Dam, 75 miles (120 kilometers) north of Sacramento, have eased. But people were still being told to stay out of the area. / AFP / Josh Edelson (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - Crews work on a damaged section of the Oroville Dam in Oroville, California on February 13, 2017. Almost 200,000 people were under evacuation orders in northern California Monday after a threat of catastrophic failure at the United States' tallest dam. Officials said the threat had subsided for the moment as water levels at the Oroville Dam, 75 miles (120 kilometers) north of Sacramento, have eased. But people were still being told to stay out of the area. / AFP / Josh Edelson (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - A home is seen marooned as the surrounding property is submerged in flood water in Oroville, California on February 13, 2017. Almost 200,000 people were under evacuation orders in northern California Monday after a threat of catastrophic failure at the United States' tallest dam. Officials said the threat had subsided for the moment as water levels at the Oroville Dam, 75 miles (120 kilometers) north of Sacramento, have eased. But people were still being told to stay out of the area. / AFP / Josh Edelson (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Riverbend Park is seen under flood water in Oroville, California on February 13, 2017. Almost 200,000 people were under evacuation orders in northern California Monday after a threat of catastrophic failure at the United States' tallest dam. Officials said the threat had subsided for the moment as water levels at the Oroville Dam, 75 miles (120 kilometers) north of Sacramento, have eased. But people were still being told to stay out of the area. / AFP / Josh Edelson (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Water is released from the Lake Oroville Dam after an evacuation order was lifted for communities downstream from the dam in Oroville, California, U.S. February 16, 2017. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A road is closed by the flooded Feather River outside town below the Lake Oroville Dam after an evacuation order was lifted for communities downstream from the dam in Oroville, California, U.S. February 16, 2017. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart
Rocks are hauled to the Lake Oroville Dam after an evacuation order was lifted for communities downstream from the dam in Oroville, California, U.S. February 15, 2017. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart
A helicopter flies rocks to the Lake Oroville Dam after an evacuation order was lifted for communities downstream from the dam in Oroville, California, U.S. February 15, 2017. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Trucks carry rocks as water is released from the Lake Oroville Dam after an evacuation order was lifted for communities downstream from the dam in Oroville, California, U.S. February 14, 2017. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart
Staff with the California Department of Water Resources watch as water is released from the Lake Oroville Dam after an evacuation was ordered for communities downstream from the dam in Oroville, California, U.S., February 14, 2017. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart
OROVILLE, CA - FEBRUARY 15: Reconstruction continues in a race to shore up the emergency spillway at Oroville Dam in Oroville, Calif., on Feb. 15, 2017. (Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
OROVILLE, CA - FEBRUARY 16: Clouds drift in the sky after morning showers at the Oroville Dam overlook where helicopters are ferrying sand and rocks to the dam's emergency spillway reconstruction project in Oroville, Calif., on Feb. 16, 2017. (Photo by Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
OROVILLE, CA - FEBRUARY 16: California Water Service district manager Toni Ruggle (CQ) surveys the Feather River at Riverbed Park downstream from Oroville Dam in Oroville, Calif., on Feb. 16, 2017. For decades, city officials have used the steps at the park to gauge the height of the river. Water up to the fourth step is 100,000 cubic feet per second. (Photo by Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
OROVILLE, CA - FEBRUARY 16: A mallard floats past a picnic table along the swollen Feather River at Riverbed Park downstream from Oroville Dam in Oroville, Calif., on Feb. 16, 2017. (Photo by Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
Cots are washed and set to dry at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds evacuation center in Chico, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017. State officials rushed to repair an emergency spillway for the Oroville dam -- just 150 miles (241 kilometers) north of San Francisco -- that is threatening to submerge an entire region of northern California after a recent deluge of rain. Photographer: Michael Short/Bloomberg via Getty Images
OROVILLE, CA - FEBRUARY 14: A dog sits in the back of a pickup truck as a helicopter picks up a bag of rocks at a staging area near the Oroville Dam on February 14, 2017 in Oroville, California. More than 188,000 people were ordered to evacuate after a hole in the emergency spillway in the Oroville Dam threatened to flood the surrounding area. (Photo by Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

"It was terrible..sleeping in the car. No place to go. Everybody was booked, highways were pretty much all booked. It took probably about four hours to get from Marysville to Sacramento," said Gonzalez.

Gonzalez is lucky.

The company he works for, AmeriGas, is covering his hotel bill.

Erica Prado's covered expenses another way for herself and the 75 members of her church who had to run for a different sort of salvation in the middle of Sunday service because of the flood threat.

"They were able to price match on line through Expedia...so they've been great to accommodate us," said Prado.

She was able to hold the Heritage Inn to a $67.99 a night price.

But other evacuees claim they're not getting that kind of consideration.

One Facebook post suggests a room reserved there for $55 dollars shot up to $350 because of "overbooking" problems amidst the flood of folks fleeing a potential actual flood.

After spending one night at Roseville's Hyatt Place for $112, Andi Crivello and her family wanted to extend their stay.

She shared what happened next with FOX40 by phone.

"They told us we could do that, but the price was now gonna be $165," she said.

The changing prices sent the Crivellos back to their home in the evacuation zone.

When FOX40 went to the Hyatt to find out what might have happened, desk staff explained that Monday nights are always more expensive than Sunday nights because the occupancy rates are higher.

Those employees then said the general manager would have more information on Tuesday.

At the Heritage Inn Express, desk staff also referred our crews to the general manager after saying they could not comment on how room prices might have changed from Sunday to Monday.

State law allows for an increase of no more than 10 percent in these situations.

California's Attorney General has issued a consumer warning reminding everyone that state"... law protects people impacted by an emergency from illegal price gouging on gas, food, housing and other essential supplies."

In his statement Xavier Becerra went on to say, "I urge hotels, gas stations and other businesses operating in and around the evacuation area to understand and comply with the law."

Becerra's office is also encouraging anyone who feels they may have been overcharged to contact his office and make a report.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners

20 Folks Recall Shocking Interview Moments That Made Them NOT Want the Job 20 Folks Recall Shocking Interview Moments That Made Them NOT Want the Job
Man Suspects His Wife Is Cheating On Him - Then His Daughter Reveals What's Really Going Man Suspects His Wife Is Cheating On Him - Then His Daughter Reveals What's Really Going
Nature Gets Revenge On Safari Hunter Who Killed Elephants And Lions For Sport Nature Gets Revenge On Safari Hunter Who Killed Elephants And Lions For Sport