President Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address: Full Text

On Nov. 19, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln delivered his historic Gettysburg Address at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery in Pennsylvania.

Today, Lincoln is remembered as guiding America through its most contentious period to date -- the Civil War era. As the nation stood divided, President Lincoln fought to unify the nation and regain the South.

While the 16th president delivered many historic speeches throughout his presidency, the Gettysburg Address is arguably the most famous of Lincoln's oratory remarks.

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Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of the United States.

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN (1809-1865) as 16th President of the USA

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Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865). President in 1860. Monumental statue (1920). Lincoln Memorial. Washington D.C. United States.

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President Abraham Lincoln standing.

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Vintage portrait c1860s of President Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865) - the 16th US President and the first to be assassinated.

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Abraham Lincoln, three-quarter length portrait, seated and holding his spectacles and a pencil

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Abraham Lincoln, U.S. President, Circa 1861

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN (1809-1865) American President photographed by Matthew Brady 9 February 1864

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Black and white engraving print c1860s of US President Abraham Lincoln at home with his wife Mary and sons Thomas and Robert.

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"Abraham Lincoln" by Charles Wesley Jarvis, 1861 - Smithsonian National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC USA

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Read below for the full text of Lincoln's address:

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate -- we can not consecrate -- we can not hallow -- this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us -- that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion -- that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain -- that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom -- and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Abraham Lincoln
November 19, 1863

RELATED: History of the Lincoln Memorial

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Lincoln Memorial history
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Lincoln Memorial history
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBURARY 15: The Lincoln Memorial is seen February 15, 2016 in Washington, DC. Rubenstein announced he is giving 18 million dollars to make improvements to the Lincoln Memorial. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - CIRCA 1914: Lincoln Memorial Undergoes Construction as cranes lift blocks of marble atop Greek Columned Monument to the 16th President (Photo by Buyenlarge/Getty Images)
379536 10: Crowds gather outside the Lincoln Memorial for a Memorial Day dedication in 1922 in Washington DC. (Photo by National Archives/Newsmakers)
Aerial view of the Lincoln Memorial, Washington DC, USA, from a Zeppelin, 1928 (1933). A photograph from Zeppelin-Weltfahrten, Vom ersten Luftschiff 1899 bis zu den Fahrten des LZ127 Graf Zeppelin 1932, Dresden, 1933. (Photo by The Print Collector/Print Collector/Getty Images)
Lincoln Memorial In Washington, DC, 1955. (Photo by Frederic Lewis/Getty Images)
380887 23: Demonstrators gather in front of the Lincoln Memorial for a civil rights rally August 28, 1963 in Washington. (Photo by National Archive/Newsmakers)
NOV 7 1963, NOV 24 1964; A plain and Practical Government Building Contrasts with the Grand Lincoln Memorial; (Photo By Lowell Georgia/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
An unidentified woman photographs the Lincoln Memorial, Washington DC, May 1971. (Photo by Joseph Klipple/Getty Images)
Four American flags on the National Mall with the Lincoln Memorial and reflecting pool visible, with a traffic circle in the foreground, at dawn, Washington DC, 1973. (Photo by Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - 1988/01/01: USA, Washington D.c., Lincoln Memorial. (Photo by Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images)
146027 11: (NO NEWSWEEK - NO USNEWS) Aretha Franklin sings in front of the Lincoln Memorial January 17, 1993 in Washington, DC. Numerous musicians and performers gathered in front of the Memorial to celebrate the inauguration of President Bill Clinton. (Photo by Cynthia Johnson/Liaison)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 25: An unidentified National Park Service worker cleans the statue of Abraham Lincoln 25 October as part of the annual cleaning of the Lincoln Memorial on the National Mall in Washington DC. AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read JOYCE NALTCHAYAN/AFP/Getty Images)
A couple feed ducks at the reflecting pool in front of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC April 10, 1999. Sunny skies and temperatures in the low sixties marked a beautiful spring day in the nation's capital. (Photo by Michael Smith)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 01: Dusk view of the Lincoln Memorial, Washington Monument and U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C. (Photo by Carol M. Highsmith/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, UNITED STATES: Tourists cross the National Mall near the Lincoln Memorial 14 July 2001 in Washington, DC. The Washington DC Convention and Tourism Corp. predicts there will be about 5 million visitors during June, July and August this year, slightly fewer than last summer due to the slowing economy. About 17.7 million visitors come to the District each year; the busiest seasons are spring and fall. AFP PHOTO/TIM SLOAN (Photo credit should read TIM SLOAN/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 18: Inauguration of the 43th president of the United States Georges W. Bush in Washington, United States on January 18, 2001 - Lincoln memorial. (Photo by Pool BASSIGNAC/BUU/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
The Lincoln Memorial and Reflecting pond at sunrise in Washington DC (Photo by Visions of America/UIG via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - MAY 25: Lincoln Memorial statue by Daniel Chester French, Washington, D.C. (Photo by Carol M. Highsmith/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)
Washington, UNITED STATES: A statue of former US President Abraham Lincoln looks out over the National Mall from the inside of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC, 21 July 2007. Opened to the public in 1922 and designed by Henry Bacon, the memorial to America's 16th president includes carved inscriptions of Lincoln's second Inaugural Address and his Gettysburg Address, two of his most famous speeches. AFP PHOTO/SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
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