No rise in deportations from US to Mexico thus far, Mexican foreign minister says


There has been no rise in deportations from the United States to Mexico under President Donald Trump, Mexico's foreign minister said on Monday.

In fact, the rate might be even slightly slower than the rate this time last year, under Barack Obama, Reuters reported Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray as saying in a television interview.

But, he said, the number of concerned phone calls Mexican consulates are receiving has at least tripled, with that figure "growing exponentially."

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Where the wall already exists along the US-Mexico border
A gap in the U.S.-Mexico border fence is seen outside Jacumba, California, United States, October 7, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake 
U.S. customs and border patrol officers inspect a vehicle entering the U.S. from Mexico at the border crossing in San Ysidro, California, United States, October 14, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake 
U.S. customs and border patrol officers inspect a vehicle entering the U.S. from Mexico at the border crossing in San Ysidro, California, United States, October 14, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake 
Men talk on a street in the town of Calexico, California, United States, October 8, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake 
A U.S. customs and border patrol officer stands at a border crossing in San Ysidro, California, United States, October 14, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
Recent arrivals from Mexico wait to board a greyhound bus in San Ysidro, California, United States, October 14, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
Highway 82 towards Douglas, Arizona is seen near Sonoita, Arizona, United States, October 10, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake 
Clouds float above the border towns of Nogales, Mexico and Nogales, Arizona, United States, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake 
A sign warning drivers that firearms and ammunition are prohibited in Mexico is seen at the U.S.-Mexico border in Nogales, Arizona, United States, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
Buildings in Nogales, Mexico (R) are separated by a border fence from Nogales, Arizona, United Sates, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
An abandoned car sits off the side of a road near Jacumba, California, United States, October 7, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake 
A worker makes his way through the water after setting up an irrigation system on an agricultural field, near Calexico, California, U.S. October 7, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
An abandoned car sits off the side of a road near Jacumba, California, United States, October 7, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake 
A church at the Museum of History in Granite is seen in Felicity, California, United States, October 8, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
A man drives a tractor plowing a field at sunrise near Calexico, California, United States, October 8, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake 
Residential homes are seen next to the fence that borders Mexico, in Douglas, Arizona, United States, October 10, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
Pedestrians wait to cross the street in Calexico, California, Unites States, October 7, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
The town of Bisbee is seen in Arizona, United States, October 10, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
Pedestrians make their way into the the United States from Mexico at the pedestrian border in Nogales, Arizona, United States, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
A roadside collection of alien dolls and toy UFO saucers is seen next to a roadside residence neat Jacumba, California, United States, October 7, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
A road abruptly ends next to a sign for a cattle ranch near Douglas, Arizona, United States, October 10, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
A boy rides an all-terrain vehicle next Mexican border along the Buttercup San Dunes in California, United States, October 8, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
An old refurbished gas station is seen in Lowell, Arizona, United States, October 10, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake 
A man rides a tricycle past a grocery store in a town that borders Mexico, in San Luis Butter, California, United States, October 8, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake 
A U.S. customs and border patrol truck drives past the fence that marks the border between U.S. and Mexico, in Calexico, California, United States, October 8, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
A truck drives west towards California along highway 8 near Gila Bend, Arizona, United States, October 10, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
Electronic items are displayed in a shop window in Calexico, California, United States, October 7, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake 
A residential home is seen in Nogales, Arizona, United States, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake 
A fence separates the border towns of Nogales, Mexico (R) and Nogales, Arizona, United Sates, October 9, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
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A previously scheduled meeting between Trump and Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto was canceled amid a political spat. Trump spoke with Pena Nieto by phone Jan. 27, in a call during which "bilateral relations, border security and trade" were discussed, the White House said. A previous call between the two emphasized "respect for the sovereignty of both nations," the administration said.

Trump pledged as president-elect to move swiftly to deport 2 to 3 million immigrants in the United States who lack documentation and "are criminal and have criminal records." He said his administration would make a further "determination" on those remaining without documentation "after the border is secure and after everything gets normalized," without committing to further detail.

Some have pointed out that the 2 to 3 million figure is comparable to the roughly 2.5 million Obama deported during his entire administration.

Mexico City was the site of mass protests against both Trump and Pena Nieto on Sunday. Trump's perceived strength against Pena Nieto has emboldened Mexico's left, with some calling for the Mexican president to step down.

"I think the wall and the demagoguery of patriotism are no match for the dignity and humanity of the American people," leftist, anti-Trump Mexican politician Andrés Manuel López Obrador told a rally in Los Angeles on Sunday, shouting out "long live California" and hailing the state that broke heavily against Trump in November's election as "a refuge and blessing for immigrants."

Obrador has been labeled a "clear contender" to run for Mexican president in 2018, when Pena Nieto will be ineligible to run again due to term limits.

Copyright 2017 U.S. News & World Report

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