Amazing discovery with new Dead Sea Scrolls cave found

By Buzz60

Archaeologists believe they have made another major discovery involving the Dead Sea Scrolls.

Hebrew University has found what it believes to be the 12th cave that once contained the historic documents.

College staffers found broken jars and clothe that they say was used to hold the scrolls in a cave located in the West Bank, near the Dead Sea.

See more on the Dead Sea Scrolls:

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A volunteer with the Israeli Antique Authority rests during a break at the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
An Israeli Antique Authority camp is seen near the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
A hat and boots belonging to a volunteer with the Israeli Antique Authority are seen inside the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun
A volunteer with the Israeli Antique Authority holds a securing rope as he walks down to enter the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
A volunteer of the Israeli Antique Authority holds a securing rope as he climbs out of the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
A volunteer with the Israeli Antique Authority works inside the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
Volunteers with the Israeli Antique Authority work inside the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
Volunteers with the Israeli Antique Authority work at the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
A volunteer with the Israeli Antique Authority works at the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
A volunteer with the Israeli Antique Authority holds a bone found at the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
Volunteers with the Israeli Antique Authority work at the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
A volunteer with the Israeli Antique Authority holds a tooth found at the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
Volunteers with the Israeli Antique Authority work at the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
A volunteer with the Israeli Antique Authority rests during a break at the Cave of the Skulls, an excavation site in the Judean Desert near the Dead Sea, Israel June 1, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
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Archaeologists report the documents are likely to date back thousands of years. Unfortunately, experts believe the scrolls were stolen in the 1800's.

University officials say the discovery is a milestone because they previously believed only 11 caves existed with the last one found 60 years ago.

Historians are asking the Israeli government to search more caves as more scrolls could exist, but time is running out because the documents are at risk of getting stolen!

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