Orangutans have a more complicated form of communication than we thought

According to a new study published in Nature Human Behavior, orangutans can talk, sort of.

Researchers studied "kiss squeak" sounds the apes use to communicate and found that the sounds actually contained a lot of detailed information.

These sounds may have been precursors to the consonants found in human language.

The orangutans may also use different sounds to communicate the same idea, equivalent to human synonyms.

The BBC quoted study co-author Dr. Adriano Reis e Lameira as saying, "they seemed to make doubly sure that the message was received so they would send the same message with different [kiss squeak combination] signals."

How do you say "that's cool" in orangutan?

See more of the brilliant animals below:

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Mother Orangutan with Baby
A female of the orangutan with a cub in a native habitat.The cub of the orangutan kisses mum. Borneo Rainforest. (Pongo pygmaeus). Indonesia
A female Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) Sulli (R) gives a hug to her partner Peek while their five-month-old baby female clings to her at Bioparc Fuengirola in Fuengirola, near Malaga, southern Spain, September 12, 2016. REUTERS/Jon Nazca
A five-month-old baby female Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) sits on her mother Sulli at Bioparc Fuengirola in Fuengirola, near Malaga, southern Spain, September 12, 2016. REUTERS/Jon Nazca
SHANGHAI, CHINA - NOVEMBER 25: Orangutan Fei Fei holds a male cub in her arm at Shanghai Zoo on November 25, 2016 in Shanghai, China. Orangutan Fei Fei gave birth to a male cub at Shanghai Zoo on October 26. The male cub's father Bin Bin and his mother Fei Fei came to Shanghai Zoo from Philippines in July in 2012. It's the first successful reproduction of Orangutan at Shanghai Zoo. (Photo by VCG/VCG via Getty Images)
SHANGHAI, CHINA - NOVEMBER 25: Orangutan Fei Fei holds a male cub in her arm at Shanghai Zoo on November 25, 2016 in Shanghai, China. Orangutan Fei Fei gave birth to a male cub at Shanghai Zoo on October 26. The male cub's father Bin Bin and his mother Fei Fei came to Shanghai Zoo from Philippines in July in 2012. It's the first successful reproduction of Orangutan at Shanghai Zoo. (Photo by VCG/VCG via Getty Images)
NORTH SUMATRA, INDONESIA - NOVEMBER 10: Baby sumatran orangutans (Pongo abelii) playing around the trees as they train at Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme's rehabilitation center on November 10, 2016 in Kuta Mbelin, North Sumatra, Indonesia. The Orangutans in Indonesia have been known to be on the verge of extinction as a result of deforestation and poaching. Found mostly in South-East Asia, where they live on the islands of Sumatra and Borneo, the endangered species continue to lose their habitat as a result of corporate expansion in a developing economy. Indonesia approved palm oil concessions on nearly 15 million acres of peatlands over the past years and thousands of square miles have been cleared for plantations, including the lowland areas that are the prime habitat for orangutans. (Photo by Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)
MEMPHIS - OCTOBER 02: Orangutan at the Memphis Zoo in Memphis, Tennessee on October 2, 2016. (Photo By Raymond Boyd/Getty Images)
This picture taken on August 4, 2016 shows an orphaned orangutan baby holding on to the leg of an animal welfare worker, as they travel from 'jungle school' a lunch area at the International Animal Rescue centre outside the city of Ketapang in West Kalimantan. Ignoring the shrieks of his rowdy, wrestling classmates, baby orangutan Otan practises swinging alone at his 'jungle school' on Borneo island, switching hands and hanging upside down as he builds confidence high above the forest floor. The three-year-old is learning to fend for himself since being found wandering a palm oil plantation, alone and suffering smoke inhalation, at the height of fires last year that razed huge swathes of rainforest in Indonesia's part of Borneo. / AFP / BAY ISMOYO / TO GO WITH AFP STORY: 'INDONESIA-CONSERVATION-ENVIRONMENT-ANIMAL-ORANGUTAN / FEATURE BY NICK PERRY (Photo credit should read BAY ISMOYO/AFP/Getty Images)
This picture taken on August 4, 2016 shows three orphaned orangutan babies hanging in a tree whilst attending 'jungle school' at the International Animal Rescue centre outside the city of Ketapang in West Kalimantan. Ignoring the shrieks of his rowdy, wrestling classmates, baby orangutan Otan practises swinging alone at his 'jungle school' on Borneo island, switching hands and hanging upside down as he builds confidence high above the forest floor. The three-year-old is learning to fend for himself since being found wandering a palm oil plantation, alone and suffering smoke inhalation, at the height of fires last year that razed huge swathes of rainforest in Indonesia's part of Borneo. / AFP / BAY ISMOYO / TO GO WITH AFP STORY: 'INDONESIA-CONSERVATION-ENVIRONMENT-ANIMAL-ORANGUTAN / FEATURE BY NICK PERRY (Photo credit should read BAY ISMOYO/AFP/Getty Images)
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