Republican official Dan Adamini apologizes for distasteful Kent State comment

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Michigan Republican leader Dan Adamini came under fire after tweeting a distasteful comment concerning the recent UC Berkeley protests.

Adamini took to both Facebook and Twitter to express his disdain for the protests. He has since deleted the posts, but Michigan's Democratic Party shared screenshots:

When speaking about the protests, which were sparked by the event by alt-right leader Milo Yiannopoulos, Adamini said it's "time for another Kent State." He's referencing the Kent State University shooting that occurred in 1970, where soldiers brought in due to protests ended up killing four students and wounding nine.

See images from the Kent State shooting

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National Guard troops throw tear gas into the rioters at Kent State protesting the American invasion of Cambodia. Shortly after the troops opened fire on the unarmed students, killing four and and wounding nine others. Kent, Ohio, May 4, 1970. (Photo by Underwood Archives/Getty Images)
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"Violent protesters who shut down free speech? Time for another Kent State perhaps. One bullet stops a lot of thuggery," he tweeted.

Adamini, Secretary of the Marquette County Republican Party, doubled down in a Facebook post: "I'm thinking that another Kent State might be the only solution ... They do it because they know there are no consequences yet."

Soon after, Chair of the Michigan Democratic Party, Brandon Dillon, called for Adamini to resign from his position.

Spokesman for the Michigan Republican Party, Sarah Anderson, also condemned Adamini's words. She told the Detroit Free Press, "Dan spoke for himself, not on behalf of the party. It was insensitive and out of line."

Check out photos from Berkeley's protests

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A worker surveys the damage to a vandalized Starbucks after a student protest turned violent at UC Berkeley during a demonstration over right-wing speaker Milo Yiannopoulos, who was forced to cancel his talk, in Berkeley, California, U.S., February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
BERKELEY, CA - FEBRUARY 1: People protesting controversial Breitbart writer Milo Yiannopoulos take to the streets on February 1, 2017 in Berkeley, California. A scheduled speech by Yiannopoulos was cancelled after protesters and police engaged in violent skirmishes. (Photo by Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)
A vandalized Bank of America office is seen after a student protest turned violent at UC Berkeley during a demonstration over right-wing speaker Milo Yiannopoulos, who was forced to cancel his talk, in Berkeley, California, U.S., February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
Police officers prepare to deploy a skirmish line after a student protest turned violent at UC Berkeley during a demonstration over right-wing speaker Milo Yiannopoulos, who was forced to cancel his talk, in Berkeley, California, U.S., February 1, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Lam TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
BERKELEY, CA - FEBRUARY 1: People protesting controversial Breitbart writer Milo Yiannopoulos burn trash and cardboard in the street on February 1, 2017 in Berkeley, California. A scheduled speech by Yiannopoulos was cancelled after protesters and police engaged in violent skirmishes. (Photo by Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)
BERKELEY, CA - FEBRUARY 1: A protester is carried into a building by police officers during a protest on the UC Berkeley campus on February 1, 2017 in Berkeley, California. A speech by controversial Breitbart writer Milo Yiannopoulos, who was scheduled to speak at the university, was cancelled after protesters and police engaged in violent skirmishes. (Photo by Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)
BERKELEY, CA - FEBRUARY 1: People protesting controversial Breitbart writer Milo Yiannopoulos march in the street on February 1, 2017 in Berkeley, California. A scheduled speech by Yiannopoulos was cancelled after protesters and police engaged in violent skirmishes. (Photo by Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)
BERKELEY, CA - FEBRUARY 1: Damage is seen to a Chase Bank branch following a protest on February 1, 2017 in Berkeley, California. A speech by controversial Breitbart writer Milo Yiannopoulos, who was scheduled to speak at UC Berkeley, was cancelled after protesters and police engaged in violent skirmishes. (Photo by Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)
BERKELEY, CA - FEBRUARY 1: A protester smashes the window of a Target store on February 1, 2017 in Berkeley, California. A speech by controversial Breitbart writer Milo Yiannopoulos, who was scheduled to speak at UC Berkeley, was cancelled after protesters and police engaged in violent skirmishes. (Photo by Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)
The inside of a Chase Bank is seen after being vandalised by protesters in Berkeley, California on February 1, 2017. Violent protests erupted on February 1 at the University of California at Berkeley over the scheduled appearance of a controversial editor of the conservative news website Breitbart. / AFP / Josh Edelson (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
A man pulls a piece of metal out of a window as a flare burns inside a Wells Fargo Bank in Berkeley, California on February, 1, 2017. A speech by Breitbart editor Milo Yiannopoulos scheduled at the University of Berkeley was cancelled after demonstrators set fires and threw objects at buildings to protest his appearance. / AFP / Josh Edelson (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
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Kent State also release a statement speaking against Adamini. They invited him to see the campus and their May 4 Visitor Center, which was established four years ago to commemorate the tragedy. "This abhorrent post is in poor taste and trivializes a loss of life that still pains the Kent State community today," the statement read.

Adamini released an apology to the Free Press, stating, "It was stupid, it was poorly done. But my goal was to stop the violence by protesters, not commit violence against protesters."

"The point I was trying to make, admittedly I did it very poorly ... was that the violence is really getting out of hand, and much like in the 1960s, the violence created an atmosphere where something terrible and tragic like Kent State could happen."

He continued, "I'd like to see the violence stop before we have a tragedy."

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