This veteran-run coffee company wants to take on 'anti-American' Starbucks to 'make coffee great again'

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As Trump supporters threaten to boycott Starbucks, Black Rifle Coffee Company (BRCC) is seizing the opportunity to win over coffee drinkers who support the president.

Soon after Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz announced plans to hire 10,000 refugees, in response to President Trump's executive order barring people from seven majority-Muslim countries and all refugees from entering the US, BRCC made a promise of its own.

The company, which sells coffee blends, monthly coffee club subscriptions, and java-centric apparel and gear, posted that it would hire 10,000 veterans, just as the pro-Trump movement to boycott Starbucks gained steam.

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Reunions, greetings and goodbyes amid immigration ban
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Reunions, greetings and goodbyes amid immigration ban

International travelers are greeted as they arrive at John F. Kennedy international airport in New York City, U.S., February 4, 2017.

(REUTERS/Brendan McDermid)

Massachusetts Institute of Technology student Kiki Rahmati, from Iran, cries as lead attorney Susan Church greets her at Logan International Airport in Boston on Feb. 3, 2017. She was initially not allowed to enter the US after President Donald Trump's travel ban.

(Photo by John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

A relative of Fuad Sharef, an Iraqi with an immigration visa who was prevented with his family from boarding a flight to New York a week ago, hugs his daughter goodbye in Erbil, the capital of the Kurdish region in northern Iraq February 4, 2017, before going to the airport to fly, on Turkish Airlines, to Nashville, Tennessee, their new home.

(REUTERS/Ahmed Saad)

Behnam Partopour, a Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) student from Iran, is greeted by friends at Logan Airport after he cleared U.S. customs and immigration on an F1 student visa in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S. February 3, 2017. Partopour was originally turned away from a flight to the U.S. following U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order travel ban.

(REUTERS/Brian Snyder)

Fuad Sharef, an Iraqi with an immigration visa who was prevented with his family from boarding a flight to New York a week ago, kisses his relatives goodbye at his home in Erbil, the capital of the Kurdish region in northern Iraq February 4, 2017, before going to the airport to fly, on Turkish Airlines, to Nashville, Tennessee, his new home.

(REUTERS/Ahmed Saad)

Fuad Sharef, an Iraqi with an immigration visa who was prevented with his family from boarding a flight to New York a week ago, hug his relatives goodbye at Erbil International Airport, Iraq February 4, 2017, to fly, on Turkish Airlines, to Nashville, Tennessee, their new home.

(REUTERS/Ahmed Saad)

Behnam Partopour, a Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) student from Iran, is greeted by his sister Bahar (L) at Logan Airport after he cleared U.S. customs and immigration on an F1 student visa in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S. February 3, 2017. Partopour was originally turned away from a flight to the U.S. following U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order travel ban.

(REUTERS/Brian Snyder)

Samira Asgari is greeted by a friend after she cleared U.S. customs and immigration in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S. February 3, 2017. Asgari is an Iranian scientist who had obtained a visa to conduct research at Brigham and Women's Hospital and was twice prevented from entering the United States under President Trump's executive order travel ban.

(REUTERS/Brian Snyder)

Banah Alhanfy, from Ira, is hugged and handed a rose after arriving at Logan International Airport in Boston on Feb. 3, 2017. Banah was initially not allowed to enter the US after President Donald Trump's travel ban.

(Photo by John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

Massachusetts Institute of Technology student Kiki Rahmati, from Iran, hugs someone that met her at Logan International Airport in Boston on Feb. 3, 2017. She was initially not allowed to enter the US after President Donald Trump's travel ban.

(Photo by John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

Dr. Muhamad Alhaj Moustafa, a Syrian citizen, embraces his wife Nabil Alhaffar, also a Syrian citizen, after she returned from a trip to Doha but was denied re-entry in January, at the international arrivals hall at Washington Dulles International Airport February 6, 2017 in Dulles, Virginia. A US appeals court has rejected a government request to immediately reinstate US President Donald Trump's controversial immigration ban -- the latest twist in what could be a long, high-stakes legal battle.

(BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

Salwa Tabiedi greets her son Hussamedin Agabani, a Sudanese citizen who was arriving in the United States for the first time, at the international arrivals hall at Washington Dulles International Airport February 6, 2017 in Dulles, Virginia.

(BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

Nazanin Zinouri, an Iranian engineer, is received by supporters at the Greenville Spartanburg Airport February 6, 2017 in Greenville, South Carolina. Zinouri, a Clemson graduate, works for a technology firm in Greenville, South Carolina and has lived in the United States for the last seven years. While attempting to return to South Carolina after a recent trip visiting family in Iran, she had been taken off her flight in Dubai as a result of the recent travel and immigration ban ordered by President Donald Trump.

(Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)

Shanez Tabarsi (L) is greeted by her daughter Negin after traveling to the U.S. from Iran following a federal court's temporary stay of U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order travel ban at Logan Airport in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S. February 6, 2017.

(REUTERS/Brian Snyder)

Ali Alghazali, 13, a Yemeni who was previously prevented from boarding a plane to the U.S. following U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order on travel ban, hugs his uncle Saleh Alghazali, upon Ali's arrival at Terminal 4 at JFK airport in Queens, New York City, New York, U.S. February 5, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joe Penney)

Najmia Abdishakur (R), a Somali national who was delayed entry to the U.S. because of the recent travel ban, is greeted by her mother Zahra Warsma (L) at Washington Dulles International Airport in Chantilly, Virginia, U.S. February 6, 2017.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Mustafa Aidid (center R), a Somali national who was delayed entry into the U.S. because of the recent travel ban, is reunited with his brother Taha Aidid (center L) at Washington Dulles International Airport in Chantilly, Virginia, U.S. February 6, 2017.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Ammar Aquel Mohammed Aziz (R), hugs his father Aquel (2nd R), as his brother Tareq (L) hugs his uncle Jamil Assa (2nd L) after the brothers arrived from Yemen at Dulles International airport on February 6, 2017 in Washington, DC. The brothers were prohibited from entering the U.S. a week ago due to tightened immigration policies established by the Trump administration, but were able to travel freely this week following a court injunction halting the implementation of the immigration policy.

(Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

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In some ways, it's a move that follows in Starbucks' footsteps, as the coffee giant promised in 2013 to hire 10,000 veterans. So far, Starbucks has hired more than 8,800 veterans and military spouses.

Still, BRCC would probably not enjoy the comparison to Starbucks — or, as the company calls the chain, Hipsterbucks.

"Hipsterbucks brews burnt, bulls--- coffee and they add a bunch of sugar, foam, cream and sprinkle a side of other bulls--- on the top to mask the taste of S---," reads a post on the company's blog about the immigration ban. "Mixed into each cup comes a convoluted ingredient of anti-American and anti-constitutionalism fluff that has seemed to further the entitlement of the millennial generation."

Awesome fan photo from @jcjordan24 #coffee #blackriflecoffee #freedom #america #coffeeordie

A post shared by Black Rifle Coffee Company (@blackriflecoffee) on

While most companies that have taken a public stance on the immigration ban have opposed the executive order, BRCC's pro-Trump stance seems to be paying off for the company.

"Due to an increase in demand for our premium American-roasted liquid freedom customers should expect longer than normal shipping timelines," the company announced in early February.

BRCC's pro-veteran, anti-political correctness stances have been part of the company's brand long before the Starbucks boycott. The company was founded by a veteran, Evan Hafer, and more than half of employees are veterans, Fox Business reported.

"We hold true to our values as conservative, pro-military, pro-law enforcement, and pro-2nd Amendment American citizens and never waiver in those values in order to simply make the maximum amount of profit," executive vice president and COO Scott Bollinger writes in his bio on the company website.

These values shine through in almost everything the BRCC sells. Roasts include "F--- Hipster Coffee,""Caffeine and Hate," and "Better Than a Blowjob."

Outside of coffee, customers can buy a "Make Coffee Great Again" hat or a "Coffee or Die" shirt.

As a coffee production company, BRCC does not currently directly compete with chains like Starbucks.

However, Hafer told Fox Business that the company plans to expand into the retail business. While BRCC doesn't currently have any locations, Hafer says the company wants to have 600 stores open in the next six years.

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