First female suspected to have 'tree-man syndrome' has growths removed

10-year-old Sahana Khatun may be the first female to ever be diagnosed with 'tree-man syndrome', officially know as Epidermodysplasia Verruciformis. The young Bangladeshi girl started noticing the beginning of a bark-like wart on her face four months ago, since then her condition has progressed drastically. Sahana now has protrusion on her chin, cheekbones, nose, and ears. At this time an official diagnosis has not been made. Thankfully if Sahana is the first female to be diagnosed she will be in good hands.

Dhaka's Medical College Hospital recently helped relieve Abul Bajandar's hands of 11 lbs of the bark-like warts. BANGLADESH-HEALTH-PEOPLEPhoto Credit: Getty

The same doctors who have given Abul a new lease on life are currently running tests to decipher if the young girl suffers from the rare disease. If so the doctors believe Sahana's case will take less recovery time due to its current rate of growth.

On February 7, 2017 Sahana underwent surgery to remove the growth's from her face. Dhaka Medical College Hospital doctor's say her surgery was a success and they hope to discharge her in the coming weeks.

See more of Sahana below:

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Sahana Khatun tree-man syndrome
Bangladeshi patient Sahana Khatun, 10 -- the first female known to be afflicted with the so-called 'tree man syndrome' -- is seen after her surgery to remove bark-like growths from her face in Dhaka Medical College Hospital on February 7, 2017. Sahana Khatun's doctors said they hoped to release the 10-year-old from Dhaka's Medical College Hospital within weeks after 'successful' surgery to remove the tell-tale growths from her chin, ear and nose. / AFP / STR (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
Bangladeshi patient Sahana Khatun, 10 -- the first female known to be afflicted with the so-called 'tree man syndrome' -- is seen after her surgery to remove bark-like growths from her face in Dhaka Medical College Hospital on February 7, 2017. Sahana Khatun's doctors said they hoped to release the 10-year-old from Dhaka's Medical College Hospital within weeks after 'successful' surgery to remove the tell-tale growths from her chin, ear and nose. / AFP / STR (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
Doctors in Bangladesh will form a medical board to assess a 10-year-old girl with bark-like warts growing out of her face, believed to be tree-man syndrome, a rare genetic hereditary skin disorder. A six-member medical board will be formed to assess Shahana Khatun's illness, Dr Samanta Lal of Dhaka Medical College Hospital said, adding that her treatment will be free of cost, according to a media report today. Shahana Khatun's father Shahjahan Mia, a farmer became concerned when a growth previously thought to be prickly heat rashes started to spread and grow on his daughters face(Photo by Khandaker Azizur Rahman Sumon/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
In this photograph taken on January 30, 2017, Bangladeshi patient Sahana Khatun, 10, poses for a photograph at the Dhaka Medical College and Hospital. A young Bangladeshi girl with bark-like warts growing on her face could be the first female ever afflicted by so-called "tree man syndrome", doctors studying the rare condition said January 31. Ten-year-old Sahana Khatun has the tell-tale gnarled growths sprouting from her chin, ear and nose, but doctors at Dhaka's Medical College Hospital are still conducting tests to establish if she has the unusual skin disorder. (Photo by Mamunur Rashid/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
In this photograph taken on January 30, 2017, Bangladeshi patient Sahana Khatun, 10, poses for a photograph at the Dhaka Medical College and Hospital. A young Bangladeshi girl with bark-like warts growing on her face could be the first female ever afflicted by so-called "tree man syndrome", doctors studying the rare condition said January 31. Ten-year-old Sahana Khatun has the tell-tale gnarled growths sprouting from her chin, ear and nose, but doctors at Dhaka's Medical College Hospital are still conducting tests to establish if she has the unusual skin disorder. (Photo by Mamunur Rashid/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
In this photograph taken on January 30, 2017, Bangladeshi patient Sahana Khatun, 10, poses for a photograph at the Dhaka Medical College and Hospital. A young Bangladeshi girl with bark-like warts growing on her face could be the first female ever afflicted by so-called "tree man syndrome", doctors studying the rare condition said January 31. Ten-year-old Sahana Khatun has the tell-tale gnarled growths sprouting from her chin, ear and nose, but doctors at Dhaka's Medical College Hospital are still conducting tests to establish if she has the unusual skin disorder. (Photo by Mamunur Rashid/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - In this photograph taken on January 30, 2017, Bangladeshi patient Sahana Khatun, 10, poses for a photograph at the Dhaka Medical College and Hospital. A young Bangladeshi girl with bark-like warts growing on her face could be the first female ever afflicted by so-called 'tree man syndrome', doctors studying the rare condition said January 31. Ten-year-old Sahana Khatun has the tell-tale gnarled growths sprouting from her chin, ear and nose, but doctors at Dhaka's Medical College Hospital are still conducting tests to establish if she has the unusual skin disorder. / AFP / STR (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
A girl afflicted with bark-like warts on her face has been admitted to Dhaka Medical College Hospital, where two others with similar condition are undergoing treatment, in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on February 6, 2017. (Photo by Sony Ramany/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
A girl afflicted with bark-like warts on her face has been admitted to Dhaka Medical College Hospital, where two others with similar condition are undergoing treatment, in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on February 6, 2017. (Photo by Sony Ramany/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
A girl afflicted with bark-like warts on her face has been admitted to Dhaka Medical College Hospital, where two others with similar condition are undergoing treatment, in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on February 6, 2017. (Photo by Sony Ramany/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
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