Zookeepers are nursing this preemie hippo back to health

The Cincinnati Zoo has a big struggle on its hands. It's caring for a tiny hippopotamus.

Fiona the hippo was born Jan. 24 — six weeks before her due date. She weighed 29 pounds. That sounds big for a newborn, but baby hippos can weigh up to 120 pounds at birth.

RELATED: Baby elephant gets hydrotherapy treatment

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Baby elephant gets hydrotherapy treatment

TOPSHOT - Six month-old baby elephant 'Clear Sky' rests her head on the shoulder of one of her guardians during a short break in a hydrotherapy session at a local clinic in Chonburi Province on January 5, 2017. After losing part of her left foot in a snare in Thailand, baby elephant 'Clear Sky' is now learning to walk again -- in water. The six-month-old is the first elephant to receive hydrotherapy at an animal hospital in Chonburi province, a few hours from Bangkok. The goal is to strengthen the withered muscles in her front leg, which was wounded three months ago in an animal trap laid by villagers to protect their crops.

(ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

Six month-old baby elephant 'Clear Sky' tries to stay afloat at the beginning of a hydrotherapy session at a local veterinary clinic in Chonburi Province on January 5, 2017. After losing part of her left foot in a snare in Thailand, baby elephant 'Clear Sky' is now learning to walk again -- in water. The six-month-old is the first elephant to receive hydrotherapy at an animal hospital in Chonburi province, a few hours from Bangkok. The goal is to strengthen the withered muscles in her front leg, which was wounded three months ago in an animal trap laid by villagers to protect their crops.

(ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

Thai veterinarian Padet Siridumrong (L) treats the wounds of Fah Jam, a five-month-old baby elephant, after a hydrotherapy treatment as part of a lengthy rehabilitation process to heal her injured front left foot at a rehabilitation center in Pattaya, Thailand January 5, 2017. The baby elephant was injured at three months old when she got stuck in an animal snare put up by villagers to prevent elephant intrusions in Chanthaburi province. The hydrotherapy is thought to help her exercise her bicep muscles and help her walk again as she has been refusing to stand on all four legs.

(REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha)

Five-month-old baby elephant Fah Jam swims during a hydrotherapy treatment as part of a lengthy rehabilitation process to heal her injured front left foot at a rehabilitation center in Pattaya, Thailand January 5, 2017. The baby elephant was injured at three months old when she got stuck in an animal snare put up by villagers to prevent elephant intrusions in Chanthaburi province.

(REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha)

Fah Jam, a five-month-old baby elephant, is pictured in her enclosure at the Nong Nooch Tropical Garden in Pattaya, Thailand January 5, 2017. The baby elephant was injured at three months old when she got stuck in an animal snare put up by villagers to prevent elephant intrusions in Chanthaburi province. The hydrotherapy is thought to help her exercise her bicep muscles and help her walk again as she has been refusing to stand on all four legs.

(REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha)

Fah Jam, a five-month-old baby elephant, receives help from handlers as she arrives for a hydrotherapy treatment as part of a lengthy rehabilitation process to heal her injured front left foot at a rehabilitation center in Pattaya, Thailand January 5, 2017. The baby elephant was injured at three months old when she got stuck in an animal snare put up by villagers to prevent elephant intrusions in Chanthaburi province. The hydrotherapy is thought to help her exercise her bicep muscles and help her walk again as she has been refusing to stand on all four legs.

(REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha)

Six month-old baby elephant 'Clear Sky' reaches out with her trunk from her enclosure at the Nong Nooch Tropical Garden tourist park before she was taken to a local veterinary clinic for a hydrotherapy session in Chonburi Province on January 5, 2017. After losing part of her left foot in a snare in Thailand, baby elephant 'Clear Sky' is now learning to walk again -- in water. The six-month-old is the first elephant to receive hydrotherapy at an animal hospital in Chonburi province, a few hours from Bangkok. The goal is to strengthen the withered muscles in her front leg, which was wounded three months ago in an animal trap laid by villagers to protect their crops.

(ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

Fah Jam, a five-month-old baby elephant, receives help from handlers as she arrives for a hydrotherapy treatment as part of a lengthy rehabilitation process to heal her injured front left foot at a rehabilitation center in Pattaya, Thailand January 5, 2017. The baby elephant was injured at three months old when she got stuck in an animal snare put up by villagers to prevent elephant intrusions in Chanthaburi province. The hydrotherapy is thought to help her exercise her bicep muscles and help her walk again as she has been refusing to stand on all four legs.

(REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha)

Fah Jam, a five-month-old baby elephant, is pictured in her enclosure at the Nong Nooch Tropical Garden in Pattaya, Thailand, January 5, 2017. The baby elephant was injured at three months old when she got stuck in an animal snare put up by villagers to prevent elephant intrusions in Chanthaburi province. The hydrotherapy is thought to help her exercise her bicep muscles and help her walk again as she has been refusing to stand on all four legs.

(REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha)

Fah Jam, a five-month-old baby elephant, is pictured in her enclosure at the Nong Nooch Tropical Garden in Pattaya, Thailand January 5, 2017. The baby elephant was injured at three months old when she got stuck in an animal snare put up by villagers to prevent elephant intrusions in Chanthaburi province. The hydrotherapy is thought to help her exercise her bicep muscles and help her walk again as she has been refusing to stand on all four legs.

(REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha)

Fah Jam, a five-month-old baby elephant, receives help from handlers as she arrives for a hydrotherapy treatment as part of a lengthy rehabilitation process to heal her injured front left foot at a rehabilitation center in Pattaya, Thailand January 5, 2017. The baby elephant was injured at three months old when she got stuck in an animal snare put up by villagers to prevent elephant intrusions in Chanthaburi province. The hydrotherapy is thought to help her exercise her bicep muscles and help her walk again as she has been refusing to stand on all four legs.

(REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha)

A handler feeds Fah Jam, a five-month-old baby elephant, in her enclosure at the Nong Nooch Tropical Garden in Pattaya, Thailand January 5, 2017. The baby elephant was injured at three months old when she got stuck in an animal snare put up by villagers to prevent elephant intrusions in Chanthaburi province. The hydrotherapy is thought to help her exercise her bicep muscles and help her walk again as she has been refusing to stand on all four legs.

(REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha)

Thai veterinarian Padet Siridumrong (L) treats the wounds of Fah Jam, a five-month-old baby elephant, after a hydrotherapy treatment as part of a lengthy rehabilitation process to heal her injured front left foot at a rehabilitation center in Pattaya, Thailand January 5, 2017. The baby elephant was injured at three months old when she got stuck in an animal snare put up by villagers to prevent elephant intrusions in Chanthaburi province. The hydrotherapy is thought to help her exercise her bicep muscles and help her walk again as she has been refusing to stand on all four legs.

(REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha)

Six month-old baby elephant 'Clear Sky' reaches out with her trunk to the hand of one of her handlers at the Nong Nooch Tropical Garden tourist park in Chonburi Province on January 5, 2017. After losing part of her left foot in a snare in Thailand, baby elephant 'Clear Sky' is now learning to walk again -- in water. The six-month-old is the first elephant to receive hydrotherapy at an animal hospital in Chonburi province, a few hours from Bangkok. The goal is to strengthen the withered muscles in her front leg, which was wounded three months ago in an animal trap laid by villagers to protect their crops.

(ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

Fah Jam, a five-month-old baby elephant, plays with a handler at her enclosure at the Nong Nooch Tropical Botanical Garden in Pattaya, Thailand January 5, 2017. The baby elephant was injured at three months old when she got stuck in an animal snare put up by villagers to prevent elephant intrusions in Chanthaburi province. The hydrotherapy is thought to help her exercise her bicep muscles and help her walk again as she has been refusing to stand on all four legs.

(REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha)

Handlers wash Fah Jam, a five-month-old baby elephant, before a hydrotherapy treatment as part of a lengthy rehabilitation process to heal her injured front left foot at a rehabilitation center in Pattaya, Thailand January 5, 2017. The baby elephant was injured at three months old when she got stuck in an animal snare put up by villagers to prevent elephant intrusions in Chanthaburi province. The hydrotherapy is thought to help her exercise her bicep muscles and help her walk again as she has been refusing to stand on all four legs.

(REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha)

Six month-old baby elephant 'Clear Sky' stands next to her guardians after she was showered clean before being lowered into a pool for a hydrotherapy session at a local clinic in Chonburi province on January 5, 2017. After losing part of her left foot in a snare in Thailand, baby elephant 'Clear Sky' is now learning to walk again -- in water. The six-month-old is the first elephant to receive hydrotherapy at an animal hospital in Chonburi province, a few hours from Bangkok. The goal is to strengthen the withered muscles in her front leg, which was wounded three months ago in an animal trap laid by villagers to protect their crops.

(ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

Six month-old baby elephant 'Clear Sky' is kept afloat by a harness during a hydrotherapy session at a local veterinary clinic in Chonburi Province on January 5, 2017. After losing part of her left foot in a snare in Thailand, baby elephant 'Clear Sky' is now learning to walk again -- in water. The six-month-old is the first elephant to receive hydrotherapy at an animal hospital in Chonburi province, a few hours from Bangkok. The goal is to strengthen the withered muscles in her front leg, which was wounded three months ago in an animal trap laid by villagers to protect their crops.

(ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

Six month-old baby elephant 'Clear Sky' stands on her hind legs in her corral at the Nong Nooch Tropical Garden park in Chonburi on January 5, 2017 before she is taken to a veterinary clinic for a hydrotherapy session. After losing part of her left foot in a snare in Thailand, baby elephant 'Clear Sky' is now learning to walk again -- in water. The six-month-old is the first elephant to receive hydrotherapy at an animal hospital in Chonburi province, a few hours from Bangkok. The goal is to strengthen the withered muscles in her front leg, which was wounded three months ago in an animal trap laid by villagers to protect their crops.

(ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

Six month-old baby elephant 'Clear Sky' walks with the help of a boot on her injured leg at the Nong Nooch Tropical Garden tourist park in Chonburi Province on January 5, 2017. After losing part of her left foot in a snare in Thailand, baby elephant 'Clear Sky' is now learning to walk again -- in water. The six-month-old is the first elephant to receive hydrotherapy at an animal hospital in Chonburi province, a few hours from Bangkok. The goal is to strengthen the withered muscles in her front leg, which was wounded three months ago in an animal trap laid by villagers to protect their crops.

(ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

Six month-old baby elephant 'Clear Sky' receives assistance from her guardians during a hydrotherapy session at a local clinic in Chonburi province on January 5, 2017. After losing part of her left foot in a snare in Thailand, baby elephant 'Clear Sky' is now learning to walk again -- in water. The six-month-old is the first elephant to receive hydrotherapy at an animal hospital in Chonburi province, a few hours from Bangkok. The goal is to strengthen the withered muscles in her front leg, which was wounded three months ago in an animal trap laid by villagers to protect their crops.

(ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

Six month-old baby elephant 'Clear Sky' gets splashed with water as she is cleaned before being lowered into a pool for a hydrotherapy session at a local clinic in Chonburi province on January 5, 2017. After losing part of her left foot in a snare in Thailand, baby elephant 'Clear Sky' is now learning to walk again -- in water. The six-month-old is the first elephant to receive hydrotherapy at an animal hospital in Chonburi province, a few hours from Bangkok. The goal is to strengthen the withered muscles in her front leg, which was wounded three months ago in an animal trap laid by villagers to protect their crops.

(ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

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After she was born, Fiona was too weak to even stand up. She's received round-the-clock care from vets at the zoo.

SEE MORE: Scientists Just Realized There's More Than One Kind Of Giraffe

The zoo is taking donations to help offset the cost of caring for Fiona.

Fiona still hasn't been able to stand up for long enough to feed without help. Zookeepers are caring for her with mom and dad nearby, but she needs to get a lot bigger before she can be reunited with them.

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