Deal enables Yellowstone to slaughter up to 1,300 wild bison

A deal has been reached to proceed with the mass slaughter of as many as 1,300 wild bison in Yellowstone National Park.

According to the Associated Press, Montana Governor Steve Bullock has lifted the temporary ban he had imposed after coming to an agreement with the park to spare 25 bison for Native American tribes interested in growing their herds.

In a letter dated January 19, Bullock ordered park superintendent Dan Wenk to halt slaughter activity which is carried out to manage expanding bison populations and to reduce the threat of a disease called Brucellosis.

12 PHOTOS
Yellowstone bison
See Gallery
Yellowstone bison
American bison at a Yellowstone geyser basin in winter, Bison bison, Thermal pools provide warmth and growths of algae, food for bison in winter, West Thumb Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA, (Photo by Wild Horizons/UIG via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - 2011/07/14: USA, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Hayden Valley With Bison Herd With Babies In Fog. (Photo by Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images)
CANADA - FEBRUARY 17: American bison (Bison bison), Bovidae, Yellowstone National Park, Canada. (Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images)
GENESEE, CO-April 23, 2013: Snow continues to fall in Genesee Park on a buffalo stand in a field of fresh snow, April 23, 2013. Year ago Denver created the bison park as a tourist attraction along Interstate 70. The bison were originally sourced from Yellowstone National Park, and are considered one of the country's wildest herds. (Photo By RJ Sangosti/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
[UNVERIFIED CONTENT] Yellowstone National Park Wyoming April 2013
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, MT - MARCH 5: A herd of bison feed near Tower Junction in Yellowstone National Park. (Photo by Erik Petersen/For The Washington Post via Getty Images)
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, WY - SEPTEMBER 24, 2014: A bison grazes on grasses in the Hayden Valley section of Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. (Photo by Robert Alexander/Getty Images)
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, MT - MARCH 5: YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, MT - MARCH 5: A bison searches for food near Blacktail Plateau in Yellowstone National Park on Tuesday. (Photo by Erik Petersen/For The Washington Post via Getty Images) (Photo by Erik Petersen/For The Washington Post via Getty Images)
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, MT - MARCH 5:A bison looks back as it crosses the road near Lamar Valley in Yellowstone National Park. (Photo by Erik Petersen/For The Washington Post via Getty Images)
American Bison (also known as Buffalo) and their calves, forage for food at Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming on June 1, 2011. In the early 1800's, an estimated 65 million bison roamed throughout the continent of North America but hunting and poaching had a devastating effect on their population and by 1890, fewer than 1,000 remained. Today there are an estimated 4000 bison in Yellowstone National Park. AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - 2011/07/14: USA, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Hayden Valley With Fog, Bison. (Photo by Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

As a Bozeman Daily Chronicle report states, "Brucellosis can cause cattle to miscarry, and most of the bison in the park are believed to have been at least exposed to the disease."

The governor had reportedly been concerned about the fate of 40 bison that had been earmarked for Native American tribes but were potentially going to be killed due to concerns they carried Brucellosis.

However, the recent agreement says that 25 bulls will be quarantined for a year to monitor for diseases then be sent to the Fort Peck Reservation.

While the National Park Service acknowledges that these mass slaughters are controversial, they argue that it is a necessary practice to protect cattle and reduce the risk of overgrazing which could cause other Yellowstone animals to starve.

Read Full Story