Report: President Trump to focus counter-extremism program solely on Islam, remove white supremacists from focus

WASHINGTON/SAN FRANCISCO, Feb 1 (Reuters) - The Trump administration wants to revamp and rename a U.S. government program designed to counter all violent ideologies so that it focuses solely on Islamist extremism, five people briefed on the matter told Reuters.

The program, "Countering Violent Extremism," or CVE, would be changed to "Countering Islamic Extremism" or "Countering Radical Islamic Extremism," the sources said, and would no longer target groups such as white supremacists who have also carried out bombings and shootings in the United States.

Such a change would reflect Trump's election campaign rhetoric and criticism of former President Barack Obama for being weak in the fight against Islamic State and for refusing to use the phrase "radical Islam" in describing it. Islamic State has claimed responsibility for attacks on civilians in several countries.

The CVE program aims to deter groups or potential lone attackers through community partnerships and educational programs or counter-messaging campaigns in cooperation with companies such as Google and Facebook.

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A member of Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army (FSA), seen with the Islamic State flags in the background, walks outside of a building in the border town of Jarablus, Syria, August 31, 2016. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
A boy holding a rifle stands next to a member of Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army (FSA) in the border town of Jarablus, Syria, August 31, 2016. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army (FSA) fighters are seen in the border town of Jarablus, Syria, August 31, 2016. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
Members of Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army (FSA) are pictured as they look out from a building in the border town of Jarablus, Syria, August 31, 2016. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
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A member of Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army (FSA) is pictured in the border town of Jarablus, Syria, August 31, 2016. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
A member of the Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army (FSA) patrols in the border town of Jarablus, Syria, August 31, 2016. REUTERS/Umit Bektas TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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Some proponents of the program fear that rebranding it could make it more difficult for the government to work with Muslims already hesitant to trust the new administration, particularly after Trump issued an executive order last Friday temporarily blocking travel to the United States from seven predominantly Muslim countries.

Still, the CVE program, which focuses on U.S. residents and is separate from a military effort to fight extremism online, has been criticized even by some supporters as ineffective.

A source who has worked closely with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) on the program said Trump transition team members first met with a CVE task force in December and floated the idea of changing the name and focus.

In a meeting last Thursday attended by senior staff for DHS Secretary John Kelly, government employees were asked to defend why they chose certain community organizations as recipients of CVE program grants, said the source, who requested anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the discussions.

Although CVE funding has been appropriated by Congress and the grant recipients were notified in the final days of the Obama administration, the money still may not go out the door, the source said, adding that Kelly is reviewing the matter.

The department declined comment. The White House did not respond to a request for comment.

PROGRAM CRITICIZED

Some Republicans in Congress have long assailed the program as politically correct and ineffective, asserting that singling out and using the term "radical Islam" as the trigger for many violent attacks would help focus deterrence efforts.

Others counter that branding the problem as "radical Islam" would only serve to alienate more than three million Americans who practice Islam peacefully.

Many community groups, meanwhile, had already been cautious about the program, partly over concerns that it could double as a surveillance tool for law enforcement.

Hoda Hawa, director of policy for the Muslim Public Affairs Council, said she was told last week by people within DHS that there was a push to refocus the CVE effort from tackling all violent ideology to only Islamist extremism.

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WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 19: U.S. President Barack Obama addresses the White House Summit on Countering Violent Extremism February 19, 2015 in Washington, DC. Obama's remarks focused on countering the adoption of the world's youth to extremist ideologies. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
US President Barack Obama speaks at the White House Summit to Counter Violent Extremism at the State Department on February 19, 2015 in Washington, DC. Obama reiterated his call for the world to stand up to violent extremism Thursday, saying jihadists peddle a the lie that there is a clash of civilizations. 'The notion that the West is at war with Islam is an ugly lie,' he told a three-day conference on combatting extremism. AFP PHOTO/MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Barack Obama speaks at the White House Summit to Counter Violent Extremism at the State Department on February 19, 2015 in Washington, DC. AFP PHOTO/MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Barack Obama speaks during the White House Summit on Countering Violent Extremism at the US State Department February 19, 2015 in Washington, DC. Obama reiterated his call for the world to stand up to violent extremism Thursday, saying jihadists peddle a the lie that there is a clash of civilizations. 'The notion that the West is at war with Islam is an ugly lie,' he told a three-day conference on combatting extremism. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Barack Obama speaks during the White House Summit on Countering Violent Extremism February 18, 2015 in Washington, DC. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 18: U.S. President Barack Obama delivers closing remarks at the conclusion of the White House Summit on Countering Violent Extremism in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building February 18, 2015 in Washington, DC. In light of recent attacks in Paris, Ottawa and Sydney, the White House called the summit to 'highlight domestic and international efforts to prevent violent extremists and their supporters from radicalizing, recruiting, or inspiring individuals or groups in the United States and abroad.' (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
US President Barack Obama speaks at the White House Summit to Counter Violent Extremism at the State Department on February 19, 2015 in Washington, DC. Obama reiterated his call for the world to stand up to violent extremism Thursday, saying jihadists peddle a the lie that there is a clash of civilizations. 'The notion that the West is at war with Islam is an ugly lie,' he told a three-day conference on combatting extremism. AFP PHOTO/MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 18: White House National Security Advisor Susan Rice (C) attends the White House Summit on Countering Violent Extremism in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building February 18, 2015 in Washington, DC. In light of recent attacks in Paris, Ottawa and Sydney, the White House called the summit to 'highlight domestic and international efforts to prevent violent extremists and their supporters from radicalizing, recruiting, or inspiring individuals or groups in the United States and abroad.' (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Rotterdam Mayor Ahmed Aboutaleb listens while US President Barack Obama speaks during the White House Summit on Countering Violent Extremism February 18, 2015 in Washington, DC. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Vilvoorde Mayor Hans Bonte (L) and Rotterdam Mayor Ahmed Aboutaleb leave after listening to US President Barack Obama speak during the White House Summit on Countering Violent Extremism February 18, 2015 in Washington, DC. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 18: U.S. President Barack Obama delivers closing remarks at the conclusion of the White House Summit on Countering Violent Extremism in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building February 18, 2015 in Washington, DC. In light of recent attacks in Paris, Ottawa and Sydney, the White House called the summit to 'highlight domestic and international efforts to prevent violent extremists and their supporters from radicalizing, recruiting, or inspiring individuals or groups in the United States and abroad.' (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
US President Barack Obama speaks during the White House Summit on Countering Violent Extremism February 18, 2015 in Washington, DC. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
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"That is concerning for us because they are targeting a faith group and casting it under a net of suspicion," she said.

Another source familiar with the matter was told last week by a DHS official that a name change would take place. Three other sources, speaking on condition of anonymity, said such plans had been discussed but were unable to attest whether they had been finalized.

The Obama administration sought to foster relationships with community groups to engage them in the counterterrorism effort. In 2016, Congress appropriated $10 million in grants for CVE efforts and DHS awarded the first round of grants on Jan. 13, a week before Trump was inaugurated.

Among those approved were local governments, city police departments, universities and non-profit organizations. In addition to organizations dedicated to combating Islamic State's recruitment in the United States, grants also went to Life After Hate, which rehabilitates former neo-Nazis and other domestic extremists.

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Just in the past two years, authorities blamed radical and violent ideologies as the motives for a white supremacist's shooting rampage inside a historic African-American church in Charleston, South Carolina and Islamist militants for shootings and bombings in California, Florida and New York.

One grant recipient, Leaders Advancing & Helping Communities, a Michigan-based group led by Lebanese-Americans, has declined a $500,000 DHS grant it had sought, according to an email the group sent that was seen by Reuters. A representative for the group confirmed the grant had been rejected but declined further comment.

"Given the current political climate and cause for concern, LAHC has chosen to decline the award," said the email, which was sent last Thursday, a day before Trump issued his immigration order, which was condemned at home and abroad as discriminating against Muslims while the White House said it was to "to protect the American people from terrorist attacks by foreign nationals." (Reporting by Julia Edwards and Dustin Volz in Washington, Kristina Cooke in San Francisco; Additional reporting by Mark Hosenball in Washington; editing by Jonathan Weber and Grant McCool)

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