Iran confirms new missile test, says it does not violate nuclear deal

DUBAI, Feb 1 (Reuters) - Iran's defense minister said on Wednesday it had tested a new missile but this did not breach the Islamic Republic's nuclear accord with world powers or a U.N. Security Council resolution endorsing the pact.

Iran has test-fired several ballistic missiles since the nuclear deal in 2015, but the latest test was the first during U.S. President Donald Trump's administration. Trump said in his election campaign that he would stop Iran's missile program.

"The recent test was in line with our plans and we will not allow foreigners to interfere in our defense affairs," Defence Minister Hossein Dehghan told Tasnim news agency. "The test did not violate the nuclear deal or (U.N.) Resolution 2231."

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A U.S. official said on Monday that Iran test-launched a medium-range ballistic missile on Sunday and it exploded after traveling 630 miles (1,010 km).

The Security Council held an emergency meeting on Tuesday and recommended the matter of the missile testing be studied at committee level. The new U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, called the test "unacceptable."

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said on Tuesday that Tehran would never use its ballistic missiles to attack another country.

Some 220 Iranian members of parliament reaffirmed support for Tehran's missile program, calling international condemnation of the tests "illogical."

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RHU, SCOTLAND - JANUARY 20: Able Seaman Smith and Able Seaman Davies in their Bunkspace on HMS Vigilant, submarine on January 20, 2016 in Rhu, Scotland. HMS Vigilant is one of the UK's fleet of four Vanguard class nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines carrying the Trident nuclear missile system. A decision on when to hold a key Westminster vote on renewing Trident submarine class is yet to be decided senior Whitehall sources have admitted. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
RHU, SCOTLAND - JANUARY 20: Royal Navy security personnel stand guard on HMS Vigilant at Her Majesty's Naval Base, Clyde on January 20, 2016 in Rhu, Scotland. HMS Vigilant is one of the UK's fleet of four Vanguard class nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines carrying the Trident nuclear missile system. A decision on when to hold a key Westminster vote on renewing Trident submarine class is yet to be decided senior Whitehall sources have admitted. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
RHU, SCOTLAND - JANUARY 20: Lieutenant Alexandra Olsson in the control room on HMS Vigilant, submarine on January 20, 2016 in Rhu, Scotland. HMS Vigilant is one of the UK's fleet of four Vanguard class nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines carrying the Trident nuclear missile system. A decision on when to hold a key Westminster vote on renewing Trident submarine class is yet to be decided senior Whitehall sources have admitted. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
RHU, SCOTLAND - JANUARY 20: Royal Navy personnel respond to a fire in a control room of a Vanguard Class ship simulator at Her Majesty's Naval Base, Clyde on January 20, 2016 in Rhu, Scotland. HMS Vigilant is one of the UK's fleet of four Vanguard class nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines carrying the Trident nuclear missile system. A decision on when to hold a key Westminster vote on renewing Trident submarine class is yet to be decided senior Whitehall sources have admitted. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
RHU, SCOTLAND - JANUARY 20: Lieutenant Benson and WOZ Firth in the missile compartments on HMS Vigilant, submarine on January 20, 2016 in Rhu, Scotland. HMS Vigilant is one of the UK's fleet of four Vanguard class nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines carrying the Trident nuclear missile system. A decision on when to hold a key Westminster vote on renewing Trident submarine class is yet to be decided senior Whitehall sources have admitted. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
RHU, SCOTLAND - JANUARY 20: WOZ Johnston in the weapons room on HMS Vigilant, submarine on January 20, 2016 in Rhu, Scotland. HMS Vigilant is one of the UK's fleet of four Vanguard class nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines carrying the Trident nuclear missile system. A decision on when to hold a key Westminster vote on renewing Trident submarine class is yet to be decided senior Whitehall sources have admitted. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
RHU, SCOTLAND - JANUARY 20: WOZ Gray makes his way through a hatch on HMS Vigilant, submarine on January 20, 2016 in Rhu, Scotland. HMS Vigilant is one of the UK's fleet of four Vanguard class nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines carrying the Trident nuclear missile system. A decision on when to hold a key Westminster vote on renewing Trident submarine class is yet to be decided senior Whitehall sources have admitted. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
RHU, SCOTLAND - JANUARY 20: Surgeon Lieutenant Tweed poses in the sickbay on HMS Vigilant, submarine on January 20, 2016 in Rhu, Scotland. HMS Vigilant is one of the UK's fleet of four Vanguard class nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines carrying the Trident nuclear missile system. A decision on when to hold a key Westminster vote on renewing Trident submarine class is yet to be decided senior Whitehall sources have admitted. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
RHU, SCOTLAND - JANUARY 20: Chef Sewell prepares a curry in the Galley on HMS Vigilant, submarine on January 20, 2016 in Rhu, Scotland. HMS Vigilant is one of the UK's fleet of four Vanguard class nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines carrying the Trident nuclear missile system. A decision on when to hold a key Westminster vote on renewing Trident submarine class is yet to be decided senior Whitehall sources have admitted. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
RHU, SCOTLAND - JANUARY 20: Junior rates relax in the mess playing a playstation on HMS Vigilant, submarineon January 20, 2016 in Rhu, Scotland. HMS Vigilant is one of the UK's fleet of four Vanguard class nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines carrying the Trident nuclear missile system. A decision on when to hold a key Westminster vote on renewing Trident submarine class is yet to be decided senior Whitehall sources have admitted. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
RHU, SCOTLAND - JANUARY 20: Junior rates relax in the mess playing Vickers on HMS Vigilant, submarine on January 20, 2016 in Rhu, Scotland. HMS Vigilant is one of the UK's fleet of four Vanguard class nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines carrying the Trident nuclear missile system. A decision on when to hold a key Westminster vote on renewing Trident submarine class is yet to be decided senior Whitehall sources have admitted. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
RHU, SCOTLAND - JANUARY 20: STD Skinner poses in the Wardroom on HMS Vigilant, submarine on January 20, 2016 in Rhu, Scotland. HMS Vigilant is one of the UK's fleet of four Vanguard class nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines carrying the Trident nuclear missile system. A decision on when to hold a key Westminster vote on renewing Trident submarine class is yet to be decided senior Whitehall sources have admitted. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
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"The Islamic Republic of Iran is against weapons of mass destruction, so its missile capability is the only available deterrence against enemy hostility," the lawmakers said in a statement carried on state media on Wednesday.

The state news agency IRNA quoted Ali Shamkhani, head of Iran's National Security Council, as saying Iran would not seek "permission from any country or international organization for development of our conventional defensive capability."

The Security Council resolution was adopted to buttress the deal under which Iran curbed its nuclear activities to allay concerns they could be put to developing atomic bombs, in exchange for relief from tough economic sanctions.

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The resolution urged Tehran to refrain from work on ballistic missiles designed to deliver nuclear weapons. Critics say the resolution's language does not make this obligatory.

Tehran says it has not carried out any work on missiles specifically designed to carry nuclear payloads.

The test on Sunday, according to U.S. officials, was of a medium-range ballistic missile, a type that had been tested seven months ago as well.

Iran has one of the Middle East's largest missile programs but its potential effectiveness has been limited by a poor record for accuracy.

However, Hossein Salami, deputy head of Iran's powerful Revolutionary Guards (IRGC) said on Sunday, the day of the test, that the country was now one of the few whose ballistic missiles were capable of hitting moving objects.

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Such a capability would enable Iran to hit enemy ships, drones or incoming ballistic missile.

Some of Iran's precision-guided missiles have the range to strike its regional arch-enemy Israel.

On Monday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called Iran's new missile test a "flagrant violation" of the U.N. resolution. He said he would ask Trump in their meeting in mid- February for a renewal of sanctions against Iran. (Reporting by Bozorgmehr Sharafedin; Editing by Mark Heinrich)

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