NRA is expected to push its agenda under Trump administration

The National Rifle Association (NRA) is expected to aggressively push its agenda now that the Trump administration is in place, reports The Hill.

In the coming years, the association intends to have two highly controversial initiatives, expanded concealed carry laws and an easing of silencer restrictions, pass through Congress, notes the Wall Street Journal.

See more on the debate over gun control:

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2016 Democratic sit in for gun control
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2016 Democratic sit in for gun control
A photo shot and tweeted from the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives by U.S. House Rep. Katherine Clark shows Democratic members of the House staging a sit-in on the House floor "to demand action on common sense gun legislation" on Capitol Hill in Washington, United States, June 22, 2016. U.S. Rep. Katherine Clark/Handout via Reuters. 
A photo shot and tweeted from the floor by U.S. House Rep. Rep. John Yarmuth shows Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives, including Rep. Joe Courtney (C) staging a sit-in on the House floor "to demand action on common sense gun legislation" on Capitol Hill in Washington, United States, June 22, 2016. REUTERS/ U.S. Rep.John Yarmuth/Handout
A photo shot and tweeted from the floor of the House by U.S. House Rep. David Cicilline shows Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives, including Rep. John Lewis (R) staging a sit-in on the House floor "to demand action on common sense gun legislation" on Capitol Hill in Washington, United States, June 22, 2016. REUTERS/ U.S. Rep. David Cicilline/Handout
A photo tweeted from the floor of the U.S. House by Rep. Donna Edwards (R) shows Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives, including herself and Rep. John Lewis (L) staging a sit-in on the House floor "to demand action on common sense gun legislation" on Capitol Hill in Washington, United States, June 22, 2016. REUTERS/Rep. Donna Edwards/Handout
A photo shot and tweeted from the floor of the House by U.S. House Rep. John Yarmuth shows Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives, including Rep. Joe Courtney (L) and Rep. John Lewis (C) staging a sit-in on the House floor "to demand action on common sense gun legislation" on Capitol Hill in Washington, United States, June 22, 2016. REUTERS/U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth/Handout
UNITED STATES - JUNE 22: House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, D-Md., center left, speaks with Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., center right, as House Democrats rally on the House steps to speak about gun legislation on Wednesday, June 8, 2016. Also pictured are Rep. Jim Langevin, D-R.I., left, and Rep. Paul Tonko, D-N.Y. Democrats were staging a sit-in on the House floor in an attempt to force a vote on gun legislation in the House of Representatives. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JUNE 22: Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., flanked by House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Dan Gross, president Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, speaks about his family's experience with gun violence as House Democrats rally on the House steps to speak about gun legislation on Wednesday, June 8, 2016. Democrats were staging a sit-in on the House floor in an attempt to force a vote on gun legislation in the House of Representatives. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JUNE 22: Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) left, and Sen. Chris Murphy (D-CT) speak to reporters after leaving the House floor on Wednesday, June 8, 2016. The two senators joined House Democrats who were staging a sit-in on the House floor in an attempt to force a vote on gun legislation in the House of Representatives. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
Representative Jeb Hensarling, a Republican from Texas and chairman of the House Financial Services Committee, makes an opening statement during a hearing with Janet Yellen, chair of the U.S. Federal Reserve, not pictured, in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, June 22, 2016. By offering a subtle change to her outlook from less than a week ago, Yellen on Tuesday before the Senate Banking Committee pushed the prospect of additional interest rate increases further into the future. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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The former could essentially make it legal for a gun owner in a state that allows toting concealed weapons to do so in states that do not, so long as they follow the rules outlined in the granted concealed carry permit.

The latter would make gun add-ons that drop the decibel level of a gunshot widely available again, reports NBC News.

Clearly, silencer manufacturers would likely immediately profit, but, as the Motley Fool points out, it could also be a boon for makers of ammunition.

At present, outdoor gun ranges have limited places to set up shop due to the noise problems they create.

Fewer decibels could mean more ranges, which may result in increased bullet sales.

Despite the fact that Republicans control Congress, there are NRA agendas, such as the hope of doing away with gun permit requirements entirely, that will not likely be well supported.

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