Twitter account shares heartbreaking stories of Holocaust victims who were turned away by the US

January 27 marks International Holocaust Remembrance Day, a day designated by the United Nations as a time to remember the Holocaust and its millions of victims.

On this day in 1945, the Red Army entered the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp complex and liberated more than 7,000 remaining prisoners, many of whom were gravely ill or dying.

SEE ALSO: Dozens of survivors pay homage to victims of Auschwitz

In recognition of the solemn day, a new Twitter account called St. Louis Manifest was started to share the devastating stories of victims who were turned away by the United States when they sought refuge.

"My name is Ilse Karliner. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered at Auschwitz," one haunting post reads.

See just a handful of these gut-wrenching stories:

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Stories of refugees turned away from US for #HolocaustRemembranceDay
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Stories of refugees turned away from US for #HolocaustRemembranceDay
My name is Carl Simon. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered at Sobibor https://t.co/B7f3lvWAts
My name is Fritz Joseph. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered at Auschwitz
My name is Brigitte Joseph. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered at Auschwitz
My name is Frieda Joseph. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered at Auschwitz
My name is Justin Isner. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered at Auschwitz
My name is Ilse Karliner. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered at Auschwitz https://t.co/qkD7dP4pbt
My name is Max Hammerschlag. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered at Leitmeritz
My name is Bertha Ellen Grünthal. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered at Auschwitz https://t.co/PyMnWXdpiW
My name is Margot Hirsch. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered at Auschwitz https://t.co/uwMRFqxOya
My name is Jakob Köppel. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered at France https://t.co/j46MM897gQ
My name is Amalie Herz. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered at Belgium
My name is Dorothea Heymann. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered at Auschwitz
My name is Josef Köppel. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered at Auschwitz https://t.co/qREiM2XwnN
My name is Julius Hermanns. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered at Auschwitz https://t.co/A4nmdb8ho3
My name is Ruthild Grünthal. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered at Theresienstadt https://t.co/pxYclNerap
My name is Horst-Martin Grünthal. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered at Auschwitz https://t.co/Xh1oZCtJak
My name is Kurt Stein. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered at Auschwitz https://t.co/iXeW5SGECu
My name is Ina Finkelstein. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered at Sobibor
My name is Manfred Fink. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered at Bergen-Belsen https://t.co/2LFnB5yp3n
My name is Alex Goldschmidt. The US turned me away at the border in 1939. I was murdered at Auschwitz https://t.co/80HlGGNiO1
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The account was built by Russel Neiss, who describes himself as a Jewish educator, activist and creator of the Pocket Torah app.

The Twitter account gets its name from a ship called the St. Louis. The St. Louis sailed from Hamburg, Germany, for Havana, Cuba, on May 13, 1939 with 937 passengers on board. The vast majority of the passengers were Jews attempting to flee the Third Reich.

Most of the passengers had applied for U.S. visas and planned to stay in Cuba until they officially got clearance. But tragically, tumultuous political conditions in Cuba threatened to keep the ship from docking there.

The Cuban government only admitted 28 passengers when the St. Louis arrived in the Havana harbor on May 27. The remaining passengers were not allowed to leave the ship.

The vessel attempted to seek refuge in Miami, Florida, and many passengers sent messages to President Franklin D. Roosevelt begging for help.

President Roosevelt never responded to their pleas.

A State Department telegram sent to one of the passengers simply stated that they must "await their turns on the waiting list and qualify for and obtain immigration visas before they may be admissible into the United States."

Despite the efforts of humanitarian groups and Jewish charities, the passengers were sent back to Europe -- and were then divided between Great Britain, the Netherlands, Belgium and France.

Tragically, not all of those countries were safe from the aggressive advancement of Nazi Germany.

523 of the former passengers were trapped when Germany conquered Western Europe -- and 254 were killed in the Holocaust.

The story of the St. Louis is a haunting reminder of the real-life repercussions of U.S. immigration policy.

AOL.com was not able to reach Neiss for a comment on the St. Louis Manifest account.

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Survivors pay homage to Auschwitz victims on Holocaust Remembrance Day
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Survivors pay homage to Auschwitz victims on Holocaust Remembrance Day
Survivors walk in the former Nazi German concentration and extermination camp Auschwitz-Birkenau in Oswiecim, Poland January 27, 2017, to mark the 72nd anniversary of the liberation of the camp by Soviet troops and to remember the victims of the Holocaust. Agency Gazeta/Kuba Ociepa/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. POLAND OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN POLAND. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
The Nazi slogan "Arbeit macht frei" (Work sets you free) is pictured at the gates of the former Nazi German concentration and extermination camp Auschwitz-Birkenau in Oswiecim, Poland January 27, 2017, to mark the 72nd anniversary of the liberation of the camp by Soviet troops and to remember the victims of the Holocaust. Agency Gazeta/Kuba Ociepa/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. POLAND OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN POLAND
Survivors walk in the former Nazi German concentration and extermination camp Auschwitz-Birkenau in Oswiecim, Poland January 27, 2017, to mark the 72nd anniversary of the liberation of the camp by Soviet troops and to remember the victims of the Holocaust. Agency Gazeta/Kuba Ociepa/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. POLAND OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN POLAND
Survivor stands in front of the "death wall" in the former Nazi German concentration and extermination camp Auschwitz-Birkenau in Oswiecim, Poland January 27, 2017, to mark the 72nd anniversary of the liberation of the camp by Soviet troops and to remember the victims of the Holocaust. Agency Gazeta/Kuba Ociepa/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. POLAND OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN POLAND
Survivor places flowers at the "death wall" in the former Nazi German concentration and extermination camp Auschwitz-Birkenau in Oswiecim, Poland January 27, 2017, to mark the 72nd anniversary of the liberation of the camp by Soviet troops and to remember the victims of the Holocaust. Agency Gazeta/Kuba Ociepa/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. POLAND OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN POLAND
Survivors walk in the former Nazi German concentration and extermination camp Auschwitz-Birkenau in Oswiecim, Poland January 27, 2017, to mark the 72nd anniversary of the liberation of the camp by Soviet troops and to remember the victims of the Holocaust. Agency Gazeta/Kuba Ociepa/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. POLAND OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN POLAND
Survivors walk in the former Nazi German concentration and extermination camp Auschwitz-Birkenau in Oswiecim, Poland January 27, 2017, to mark the 72nd anniversary of the liberation of the camp by Soviet troops and to remember the victims of the Holocaust. Agency Gazeta/Kuba Ociepa/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. POLAND OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN POLAND
Survivors stand before laying a wreath in front of the "death wall" in the former Nazi German concentration and extermination camp Auschwitz-Birkenau in Oswiecim, Poland January 27, 2017, to mark the 72nd anniversary of the liberation of the camp by Soviet troops and to remember the victims of the Holocaust. Agency Gazeta/Kuba Ociepa/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. POLAND OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN POLAND
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