Trump tweets about Chicago 'carnage,' threatens to 'send in the feds'

Donald Trump is once again speaking out about the high crime rate in Chicago.

He tweeted Tuesday evening, "If Chicago doesn't fix the horrible 'carnage' going on, 228 shootings in 2017 with 42 killings (up 24% from 2016), I will send in the Feds!"

Trump's latest post is not his first reference to Chicago's rise in violence.

RELATED: Chicago violence

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CHICAGO, IL - JULY 25: Kathleen Sances, executive director of the Gun Violence Prevention PAC, protests with other demonstrators outside the Hilton Hotel where New Jersey Governor Chris Christie was attending a fundraiser for Illinois Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner on July 25, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. About 100 demonstrators opposed to Christie and Rauner's stances on gun control, teacher and other public employee pensions and other issues chanted and made speeches outside the hotel during the fundraiser. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - JULY 20: Melted candles stain the sidewalk during a memorial service for Shamiya Adams on July 20, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. Adams, 11, was killed while spending the night at a friend's home when a stray bullet flew through an open window and an interior wall and struck her in the head on July 18th. The memorial service was held outside of the home in which Adams was killed. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - JULY 20: Jonathan Beavers, 11, signs a poster memorializing Shamiya Adams on July 20, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. Adams, 11, was killed while spending the night at a friend's home when a stray bullet flew through an open window and an interior wall and struck her in the head on July 18th. The memorial service was held outside of the home in which Adams was killed. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - JULY 20: Residents watch from across the street during a memorial service for Shamiya Adams on July 20, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. Adams, 11, was killed while spending the night at a friend's home when a stray bullet flew through an open window and an interior wall and struck her in the head on July 18th. The memorial service was held outside of the home in which Adams was killed. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - JULY 20: Members of a motorcycle club rev their engines during a memorial service for Shamiya Adams on July 20, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. Adams, 11, was killed while spending the night at a friend's home when a stray bullet flew through an open window and an interior wall and struck her in the head on July 18th. The memorial service was held outside of the home in which Adams was killed. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - JULY 20: Audry Miller is comforted by community activist Andrew Holmes during a memorial service for her granddaughter, Shamiya Adams, on July 20, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. Jalante, along with family members, prepare to release ballons during a prayer vigil. Adams, 11, was killed while spending the night at a friend's home when a stray bullet flew through an open window and an interior wall and struck her in the head on July 18th. The memorial service was held outside of the home in which Adams was killed. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - JUNE 9: A teddy bear rests on a memorial in the Roseland neighborhood with stones for each young person 24 and under killed in shootings in the metro area since May 2007, on June 9, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. Diane Latiker, who lives across the street, started the memorial and founded a nonprofit called Kids Off the Block. 'I built it because I was tired of the violence,' she says. The memorial is full with 374 stones. An additional 452 stones are waiting for space. Home Depot is going to sponsor a bigger memorial in the same spot. Roseland, on the south side of the city, is one of the most crime-ridden neighborhoods in the area. (Photo by Melanie Stetson Freeman/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images)
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According to the Chicago Tribune, during a July rally, the then-candidate is quoted as saying, "Since President Obama became president, almost 5,000 killings in Chicago and nobody talks about it. Well, we're going to start talking about it."

In another Tweet early January, he wrote, "Chicago murder rate is record setting – 4,331 shooting victims with 762 murders in 2016. If Mayor can't do it he must ask for Federal help!"

RELATED: Violent crime rates in Chicago, IL

Commenting on that tweet, Adam Collins, Mayor Rahm Emanuel's spokesman, had issued a statement, saying, in part, "...we agree the federal government has a strong role to play in public safety by funding summer jobs and prevention programming for at-risk youth, by holding the criminals who break our gun laws accountable for their crimes, by passing meaningful gun laws, and by building on the partnerships our police have with federal law enforcement."

RELATED: Trump's first day as president

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Donald Trump's first day as president

White House Staff Secretary Rob Porter (2nd R) gives U.S. President Donald Trump, flanked by Vice President Mike Pence (L) and Chief of Staff Reince Priebus (R) the document to confirming James Mattis his Secretary of Defense, his first signing in the Oval Office in Washington, U.S. January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

President Donald Trump turns to House Speaker Paul Ryan as he is joined by the Congressional leadership and his family as he formally signs his cabinet nominations into law, in the President's Room of the Senate, at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/J. Scott Applewhite/Pool)

US President Donald Trump formally signs his cabinet nominations into law, at the Capitol in Washington, January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/J. Scott Applewhite/Pool)

US President Donald Trump signs an executive order as Vice President Mike Pence looks on at the White House in Washington, DC on January 20, 2017.

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump is joined by the Congressional leadership and his family as he formally signs his cabinet nominations into law, in the President's Room of the Senate, at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/J. Scott Applewhite/Pool)

US President Donald Trump signs an executive order as Vice President Mike Pence and Chief of Staff Reince Priebus look on at the White House in Washington, DC on January 20, 2017.

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump shakes hands with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y, as he is joined by the Congressional leadership and his family while he formally signs his cabinet nominations into law, at the Capitol in Washington, January 20, 2017. From left are Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y, Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen Pence, Jared Kushner, Donald Trump Jr., and Ivanka Trump.

(REUTERS/J. Scott Applewhite/Pool)

US President Donald Trump is joined by the Congressional leadership and his family, rear, wife Melania Trump, son Barron Trump, as he formally signs his cabinet nominations into law, at the Capitol in Washington, January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/J. Scott Applewhite/Pool)

President Donald Trump prepares to sign a confirmation for Defense Secretary James Mattis as his Chief of Staff Reince Priebus (L) points to the order while Vice President Mike Pence watches January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(Photo by Kevin Dietsch - Pool/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump is joined by the Congressional leadership and his family as he formally signs his cabinet nominations into law, in the President's Room of the Senate, at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/J. Scott Applewhite/Pool)

President Donald Trump signs his first executive order as president, ordering federal agencies to ease the burden of President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(Photo by Kevin Dietsch - Pool/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump is joined by the Congressional leadership and his family as he formally signs his cabinet nominations into law, in the President's Room of the Senate, at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/J. Scott Applewhite/Pool)

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