Secret Service agent said she preferred 'jail time over a bullet' for Trump

A U.S. Secret Service agent is being called to resign after implying that she would rather go to jail than take a bullet for Donald Trump.

The Washington Examiner reports that in October, Kerry O'Grady allegedly wrote a Facebook post supporting Hillary Clinton.

A screenshot believed to be from her account reads, "As a public servant for nearly 23 years, I struggle to not violate the Hatch Act."

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According to CNN, "the Hatch Act [is] a 1939 law intended to keep federal employees from directly supporting candidates."

However, O'Grady reportedly goes on to say, "I would take jail time over a bullet or an endorsement for what I believe to be disaster to this country and the strong and amazing women and minorities who reside here."

She allegedly concludes by writing, "Hatch Act be damned. I am with Her."

The Washington Examiner reports that, during an interview with O'Grady on Monday, she "said she took down the post after two to three days of greater reflection and wasn't trying to imply she wouldn't take a bullet for Trump or any officials in the Trump administration."

She is also quoted as saying, "I firmly believe in this job. I'm proud to do it and we serve the office of the president."

Nevertheless, many on social media, including Sam Stein with the Huffington Post, suggested she should resign.

According to O'Grady's LinkedIn page, she has worked for the U.S. Secret Service since 1994 and is currently a Special Agent in Charge.

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