Russia could make domestic violence legal

By Elizabeth Keatinge, Buzz60

The Russian parliament is taking steps to decriminalize domestic violence.

According to TIME, deputies in the lower house of parliament have given initial approval to a bill that would eliminate criminal liability for domestic violence. It would draw the line at serious bodily harm or rape.

See more related to this story:

13 PHOTOS
Barack Obama and Vladimir Putin through the years
See Gallery
Barack Obama and Vladimir Putin through the years
U.S. President Barack Obama extends his hand to Russian President Vladimir Putin during their meeting at the United Nations General Assembly in New York September 28, 2015. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Russian President Vladimir Putin (C) looks back at U.S. President Barack Obama (L) as they arrive with Chinese President Xi Jinping (R) at an Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Summit plenary session at the International Convention Center at Yanqi Lake, in Beijing, November 11, 2014. REUTERS/Pablo Martinez Monsivais/Pool (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
U.S. President Barack Obama (L) meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin during the G8 Summit at Lough Erne in Enniskillen, Northern Ireland June 17, 2013. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
U.S. President Barack Obama (2nd R) chats with Russia's President Vladimir Putin prior to a working session at the Group of 20 (G20) leaders summit in the Mediterranean resort city of Antalya, Turkey, November 16, 2015. REUTERS/Kayhan Ozer/Pool TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Barack Obama (L) talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin (R) and U.S. security advisor Susan Rice (2nd L) prior to the opening session of the Group of 20 (G20) Leaders summit summit in the Mediterranean resort city of Antalya, Turkey November 15, 2015. Man at 2nd R is unidentified. REUTERS/Cem Oksuz/Pool TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Barack Obama (L) talks with Russia's President Vladimir Putin as they gather for a family photo with fellow world leaders at the start of the G20 summit at the Regnum Carya Resort in Antalya, Turkey, November 15, 2015. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Barack Obama talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the APEC Economic Leadersâ Meeting in Lima, Peru November 20, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
A huge video screen on Sword Beach shows U.S. President Barack Obama and Russian President Vladimir Putin as they arrive for the International 70th D-Day Commemoration Ceremony in Ouistreham June 6, 2014. World leaders and veterans gathered by the beaches of Normandy on Friday to mark the 70th anniversary of the Allied D-Day landings that helped turn the tables in World War Two. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS ANNIVERSARY CONFLICT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
Russian President Vladimir Putin holds out his arms as he walks past U.S. President Barack Obama (centre L) during a group photo at the G20 Summit in St. Petersburg September 6, 2013. Above Obama is British Prime Minister David Cameron, above Putin is German Chancellor Angela Merkel. At right is Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (RUSSIA - Tags: TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY BUSINESS POLITICS)
Russia's President Vladimir Putin (L) welcomes U.S. President Barack Obama before the first working session of the G20 Summit in Constantine Palace in Strelna near St. Petersburg, September 5, 2013. REUTERS/Grigory Dukor (RUSSIA - Tags: POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
Russian President Vladimir Putin (L), British Prime Minister David Cameron (C) and U.S. President Barack Obama take part in a group photo for the G8 Summit in Enniskillen, Northern Ireland June 18, 2013. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: POLITICS)
U.S. President Barack Obama (R) meets with Russia's President Vladimir Putin in Los Cabos, Mexico, June 18, 2012. The leaders are in Los Cabos to attend the G20 summit. REUTERS/Jason Reed (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

The bill still has a few steps to go before it makes it to President Vladimir Putin's desk.

In conservative Russian circles there has been a push recently to re-establish traditional ways of disciplining family members.

Russian domestic violence advocates have said the current system makes it difficult for a woman to seek help and this legislation would not improve that.

A poll by state-run pollster VTsIOM showed 19% of Russians think it can be "acceptable" to hit a wife, husband or child in certain circumstances.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.