New study says cervical cancer more deadly than once thought

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By Josh King, Buzz60

A new study suggests that women's risk of dying from cervical cancer could be considerably higher than originally thought.

The study, published in the journal Cancer, says that the rate of African-American women dying from the cancer is 77% higher, while the rate of white women is 47% higher.

Researchers found that previous death rate estimates didn't take into account women who had hysterectomy procedures to remove their cervix which eliminates the risk for developing the disease.

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The data pulled from women ages 20 and older in 12 states across the country from 2000 to 2012 was then used to adjust the death rates.

Researchers still don't know why there is such a difference in the cancer between African-American and white women, but they suggest that it could be because of a lack of or limited access to cancer screenings for African-American women.

The American Cancer Society recommends women begin having pap tests every three years starting at the age of 21.

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