'There are 1,000 unanswered questions': Trump's conflict of interest problem hasn't gone away

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Despite President Trump's promises to resolve potential conflicts of interest surrounding his business empire before taking the Oval Office, it appears there has been no movement on that front, according to a report from ProPublica released Friday.

The nonpartisan organization examined more than a dozen of Trump's businesses registered in Florida, Delaware, and New York and found that no documents showing Trump relinquished control of his empire had been filed as of the time its story was published Friday afternoon.

SEE ALSO: Russia's Putin ready to meet Trump, but preparations may take months

Officials in New York and Delaware, according to ProPublica, said documents are logged in its system as soon as they are received. In Florida, documents are logged within "a day or two" of receipt.

They were asked by ProPublica whether they received paperwork from Trump's representatives: "As of 3:15 p.m. [Friday], the officials said they have not," ProPublica reported.

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Donald Trump's first day as president
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Donald Trump's first day as president

White House Staff Secretary Rob Porter (2nd R) gives U.S. President Donald Trump, flanked by Vice President Mike Pence (L) and Chief of Staff Reince Priebus (R) the document to confirming James Mattis his Secretary of Defense, his first signing in the Oval Office in Washington, U.S. January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

President Donald Trump turns to House Speaker Paul Ryan as he is joined by the Congressional leadership and his family as he formally signs his cabinet nominations into law, in the President's Room of the Senate, at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/J. Scott Applewhite/Pool)

US President Donald Trump formally signs his cabinet nominations into law, at the Capitol in Washington, January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/J. Scott Applewhite/Pool)

US President Donald Trump signs an executive order as Vice President Mike Pence looks on at the White House in Washington, DC on January 20, 2017.

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump is joined by the Congressional leadership and his family as he formally signs his cabinet nominations into law, in the President's Room of the Senate, at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/J. Scott Applewhite/Pool)

US President Donald Trump signs an executive order as Vice President Mike Pence and Chief of Staff Reince Priebus look on at the White House in Washington, DC on January 20, 2017.

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump shakes hands with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y, as he is joined by the Congressional leadership and his family while he formally signs his cabinet nominations into law, at the Capitol in Washington, January 20, 2017. From left are Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y, Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen Pence, Jared Kushner, Donald Trump Jr., and Ivanka Trump.

(REUTERS/J. Scott Applewhite/Pool)

US President Donald Trump is joined by the Congressional leadership and his family, rear, wife Melania Trump, son Barron Trump, as he formally signs his cabinet nominations into law, at the Capitol in Washington, January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/J. Scott Applewhite/Pool)

President Donald Trump prepares to sign a confirmation for Defense Secretary James Mattis as his Chief of Staff Reince Priebus (L) points to the order while Vice President Mike Pence watches January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(Photo by Kevin Dietsch - Pool/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump is joined by the Congressional leadership and his family as he formally signs his cabinet nominations into law, in the President's Room of the Senate, at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/J. Scott Applewhite/Pool)

President Donald Trump signs his first executive order as president, ordering federal agencies to ease the burden of President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(Photo by Kevin Dietsch - Pool/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump is joined by the Congressional leadership and his family as he formally signs his cabinet nominations into law, in the President's Room of the Senate, at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/J. Scott Applewhite/Pool)

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Trump's business empire is massive, stretching across several countries. It is unclear when the transfer process was initiated. Business Insider's request for comment from the PR agency representing the Trump transition team was not immediately returned.

In a press conference last week, then-president-elect Trump said he signed documents that initiated a "complete and total" transfer of his businesses to a family trust. Stacks of paper tucked into folders were displayed on a table at the press conference. Reporters were not allowed to look inside the folders.

Sherri Dillon, an attorney in charge of Trump's plan to transfer control of his businesses, said the necessary arrangements would be made by January 20.

Here's what ProPublica's investigation found:

  • New York's Department of State said business filings for the Trump Organization show Trump is still listed as the sole representative of the organization.
  • Ivanka Trump is still designated as the authorized officer for a property located at the Old Post Office in Washington D.C. that was purchased by the Trump family and was converted into a hotel.
  • No recent amendments have been filed in Delaware where most of Trump's businesses are currently registered.
  • Filings for Trump's businesses in Florida, including the Mar-A-Lago Club, the Trump International Gold Club, and DJT Holdings remain unchanged.

Ethics experts have criticized Trump's proposals to disentangle himself from his business empire, saying the changes did not go far enough to address conflict-of-interest concerns because operations would still be run through a family trust.

"What are the terms of the trust? Who is going to be the ethics monitor and what standards will he or she abide by?" said Norman Eisen, who served as the White House chief ethics lawyer under President Obama.

"There are 1,000 unanswered questions," he said.

More on the Trump family

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First Family: Meet Melania Trump
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First Family: Meet Melania Trump

Born Melanija Knavs

Originally Melanija Knavs, Melania Trump was born April 20, 1970 in Novo Mesto, Slovenia. Born to a car dealer and children's clothing designer, she grew up in a modest home in a community then part of communist Yugoslavia. Melania has a younger sister and older half brother, whom her father had from a previous relationship.

Pictured: Taken in 1977, this image shows Melania, 7, (second from the right) attending a fashion review at the textile company where her mother was employed.

Began modeling at age 16. 

In her early days of modeling, Trump worked in Milan and Paris, before moving to New York in 1996.

Pictured: Melania Knauss during Fred Trump's Funeral at Marble Collegiate Church in New York City.

The Clintons attended their wedding.

In 2005, Melania and Donald married in a Palm Beach, Florida ceremony. Shaquille O'Neal, Kelly Ripa, Barbara Walters, Matt Lauer, Katie Couric and both President Bill Clinton and then-U.S. Senator Hillary Clinton were in attendance.

Pictured: Donald and Melania sit courtside before a 2001 Toronto Raptors game.

Melania and Donald have a son, Barron.

On March 20, 2006, Melania gave birth to her and Donald's son, Barron William Trump. He is often referred to as "The Little Donald."

Donald holds a replica of his star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame as Melania holds their son Barron in Los Angeles in 2007.

She spoke at the Republican National Convention.

On July 18, Melania addressed delegates on the first day of the Republican National Convention at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. The soon-to-be first lady was quickly criticized, though, when it became clear parts of her speech were identical to that of First lady Michelle Obama in 2008.

She cares about bullying.

On November 3, Melania Trump gave her first solo campaign speech for her husband in Berwyn, Pennsylvania, saying she would work to combat bullying as first lady. "Our culture has gotten too mean and too rough, especially to children and teenagers," she said, noting that kids are often hurt when they are "made to feel less in looks or intelligence."

She said she wants to be "true to herself" as first lady.

On November 11, President-elect Trump and his family -- including Melania -- appeared on 60 Minutes in their first post-election television interview. In the interview, Melania opened up to Lesley Stahl about staying true to herself, meeting Michelle Obama at the White House and how she hopes to raise son, Barron, as they transition to life as the first family.

Melania and Barron will stay in New York for the time being.

On November 20, Trump transition team sources said that Melania and 10-year-old son, Barron, are expected to spend most of their time in New York at least through spring of 2017. The team offered keeping Barron in his Upper West Side private school as reasoning for their staying in New York.

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