Women's march against Trump swamps Washington streets, subway


WASHINGTON, Jan 21 (Reuters) - Large crowds of women, many wearing bright pink knit hats, poured into downtown Washington by bus, train and car on Saturday for a march in opposition to U.S. President Donald Trump only a day after the Republican took office.

The Washington event was expected to be the largest of a series of marches across the world in cities including Sydney, London, Tokyo and New York to criticize the new president's often angry, populist rhetoric.

The flood of people stressed the city's Metro subway system, with riders reporting enormous crowds and some end-of-line stations temporarily turning away riders when parking lots filled and platforms became too crowded.

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Women's March on Washington, D.C.
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Women's March on Washington, D.C.
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 21: Protesters march past the Rayburn House Office Building during the Women's March on Washington January 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. The march is expected to draw thousands from across the country to protest newly inaugurated President Donald Trump. (Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 21: A marcher holds a sign during the Women's March on Washington January 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. The march is expected to draw thousands from across the country to protest newly inaugurated President Donald Trump. (Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 21: Protesters march past the Rayburn House Office Building during the Women's March on Washington January 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. The march is expected to draw thousands from across the country to protest newly inaugurated President Donald Trump. (Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 21: Protesters march past the Capitol during the Women's March on Washington January 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. The march is expected to draw thousands from across the country to protest newly inaugurated President Donald Trump. (Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 21: Demonstrators arrive at Union Station for the Women's March on Washington on January 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. Yesterday Donald Trump became the 45th president of the United States. The Womens March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for womens rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents. (Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 21: Demonstrators arrive at Union Station for the Women's March on Washington on January 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. Yesterday Donald Trump became the 45th president of the United States. The Womens March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for womens rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents. (Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 21: Demonstrators arrive at Union Station for the Women's March on Washington on January 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. Yesterday Donald Trump became the 45th president of the United States. The Womens March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for womens rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents. (Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 21: Demonstrators arrive at Union Station for the Women's March on Washington on January 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. Yesterday Donald Trump became the 45th president of the United States. The Womens March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for womens rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents. (Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 21: Demonstrators arrive at Union Station for the Women's March on Washington on January 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. Yesterday Donald Trump became the 45th president of the United States. The Womens March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for womens rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents. (Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)
Demonstrators arrive on the National Mall in Washington, DC, for the Women's march on January 21, 2017. Hundreds of thousands of protesters spearheaded by women's rights groups demonstrated across the US to send a defiant message to US President Donald Trump. / AFP / Andrew CABALLERO-REYNOLDS (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators arrive on the National Mall in Washington, DC, for the Women's march on January 21, 2017. Hundreds of thousands of protesters spearheaded by women's rights groups demonstrated across the US to send a defiant message to US President Donald Trump. / AFP / Andrew CABALLERO-REYNOLDS (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 21: Demonstrators arrive at Union Station for the Women's March on Washington on January 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. Yesterday Donald Trump became the 45th president of the United States. The Womens March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for womens rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents. (Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 21: Demonstrators arrive at Union Station for the Women's March on Washington on January 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. Yesterday Donald Trump became the 45th president of the United States. The Womens March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for womens rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents. (Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 21: Demonstrators arrive at Union Station for the Women's March on Washington on January 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. Yesterday Donald Trump became the 45th president of the United States. The Womens March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for womens rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents. (Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)
A demonstrator wearing a mask of US President Donald Trump dances as others march past the US Capitol during the Women's March in Washington, DC, January 21, 2017. Hundreds of thousands of protesters spearheaded by women's rights groups demonstrated across the US to send a defiant message to US President Donald Trump. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators march past the US Capitol (L) on the National Mall in Washington, DC, for the Women's march on January 21, 2017. Hundreds of thousands of protesters spearheaded by women's rights groups demonstrated across the US to send a defiant message to US President Donald Trump. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators march on the National Mall in Washington, DC, for the Women's march on January 21, 2017. Hundreds of thousands of protesters spearheaded by women's rights groups demonstrated across the US to send a defiant message to US President Donald Trump. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators march past the US Capitol during the Women's March on Washington in Washington, DC, January 21, 2017. Hundreds of thousands of protesters spearheaded by women's rights groups demonstrated across the US to send a defiant message to US President Donald Trump. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators gather outside the U.S. Capitol Building during the Women's March on Washington in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017. The day after Donald Trump's inauguration, an estimated 200,000 demonstrators will march in Washington DC to protest the new administration and push for gender equality. Photographer: Sahil Kapur/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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Trump has angered many liberal Americans with comments seen as demeaning to women, Mexicans and Muslims, and worried some abroad with his inaugural vow on Friday to put "America First" in his decision making.

On Friday, the nation's capital was rocked by violent protests against the businessman-turned-politician, with black-clad anti-establishment activists smashing windows, setting vehicles on fire and fighting with riot police who responded with stun grenades.

One of the groups that organized Friday's protests sent a call to members to return to the streets after the women's march ended.


SEE ALSO: Timeline: The women's rights movement in the US

The protests illustrated the depth of the anger in a deeply divided country that is still recovering from the scarring 2016 campaign season. Trump defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton, the first woman nominated for president by a major U.S. party.

"It's important that our rights be respected. People have fought hard for our rights and President Trump has made it clear that he does not respect of them," said Lexi Milani, a 41-year-old restaurant owner from Baltimore, who had ridden down in a bus with 28 friends.

More on the protests

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Inauguration day protests in Washington, DC
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Inauguration day protests in Washington, DC

A limousine burns after being smashed by anti-Trump protesters on K Street on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. While protests were mostly peaceful, some turned violent. President-elect Donald Trump was sworn-in as the 45th U.S. President today.

(Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Protesters block a street after the inauguration of US President Donald Trump on January 20, 2017, in Washington, DC.

(ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)

Protesters clash with police after the inauguration of US President Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)

A woman helps a protester after he was sprayed with pepper spray during protest near the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump in Washington, DC, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)

Michael Moore speaks to protesters at McPherson Square Park following the inauguration of Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Today Trump became the 45th president of the United States.

(Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)

Protesters clash with police during the inauguration of US President Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)

A man protests the Presidential Inauguration of Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(JOSHUA LOTT/AFP/Getty Images)

A police officer tries to tackle a protester demonstrating against U.S. President Donald Trump on the sidelines of the inauguration in Washington, DC, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Adrees Latif)

An activist stands amid smoke from a stun grenade while protesting against U.S. President Donald Trump on the sidelines of the inauguration in Washington, D.C. January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Adrees Latif)

Protesters chain themselves to each other and block an entry point prior at the inauguration of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in Washington, DC, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)

Firefighters extinguish a car that was set on fire during protests near the inauguration of President Donald Trump in Washington, DC, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)

Protesters demonstrating against U.S. President Donald Trump raise their hands as they are surrounded by police on the sidelines of the inauguration in Washington, DC, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Adrees Latif)

Protesters chain themselves to an entry point prior at the inauguration of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in Washington, DC, U.S., January 20, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston

Protesters clash with police while demonstrating against U.S. President Donald Trump on the sidelines of the inauguration in Washington, DC, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Adrees Latif)

A protestor dressed as Uncle Sam attends Donald Trump's Inauguration ceremony on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(Photo by Amanda Edwards/WireImage)

Police run as they confront protesters during the inauguration of US President Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)

Protesters are surrounded by police during a protest near the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump in Washington, DC, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)

A protester is assisted by police after being injured during protests near the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump in Washington, DC, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)

Protesters chain themselves to an entry point prior at the inauguration of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in Washington, DC, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)

Demonstrators protest following the inauguration of Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Today Trump became the 45th president of the United States.

(Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)

An anti-Trump protester screams after being hit by a paintball gun fired by Police during clashes in Washington, DC, on January 20, 2107. Masked, black-clad protesters carrying anarchist flags smashed windows and scuffled with riot police Friday in downtown Washington, blocks away from the route of the parade in honor of newly sworn-in President Donald Trump. Washington police arrested more than 90 people over acts of vandalism committed on the fringe of peaceful citywide demonstrations being held against Trump's inauguration.

(JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

Police and demonstrators clash in downtown Washington after a limo was set on fire following the inauguration of President Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Washington and the entire world have watched the transfer of the United States presidency from Barack Obama to Donald Trump, the 45th president.

(Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Police stop protesters from passing through following the inauguration of Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Today Trump became the 45th president of the United States.

(Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)

Demonstrators protest following the inauguration of Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Today Trump became the 45th president of the United States.

(Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)

A man looks through a smashed car window during a protest against the inauguration of US President Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)

Demonstrators set fires as they confront police in protest against the inauguration of US President Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)

Protesters attend Donald Trump's Inauguration ceremony on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(Photo by Amanda Edwards/WireImage)

A man holds a sign in front of riot police during a protest against U.S. President Donald Trump on the sidelines of the inauguration in Washington, D.C. January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Adrees Latif)

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SUBWAYS OVERWHELMED

Washington subway trains and platforms were packed with people. The Metro sent a service alert warning of "system-wide delays due to extremely large crowds." At least one station was temporarily closed to new passengers because of the crowds backed up on the platform.

Elizabeth Newton, 59, traveled from Lafayette, California, to attend the march and stayed overnight in Baltimore. When she and her friends arrived at a rail station in that city to try to board a train to Washington, they were overwhelmed by the crowds.

"It was all the way around the block and partway around again. It was extraordinary," Newton said. She and her friends instead opted to spend $106 on a Uber ride in to the city.

"There is no question it is a very busy day. We are seeing heavy crowding on the system, particularly at the end of line stations where people have driven into the Washington D.C., area," said Dan Stessel, a spokesman for the city's Metro system.

The system was changing traffic flow at some stations, including rerouting some escalators downtown to carry all passengers out to accommodate the crowds, he said.

The Metro reported 275,000 rides as of 11 a.m. (1600 GMT) Saturday, 82,000 more than the 193,000 reported at the same time on Friday, the day of Trump's inauguration and eight times normal Saturday volume.

The crowd filled six city blocks of Independence Avenue, with more people spilling into side streets and additional marchers pouring into the area as of 11:30 a.m. (1630 GMT).

The Women's March on Washington, featuring speakers, celebrity appearances and a protest walk along the National Mall, is the brainchild of Hawaiian grandmother Teresa Shook and is intended as an outlet for women and their male supporters to vent their frustration and anxiety over Trump's victory.

Organizers said they expected several hundred thousand people to attend.

A disparate lineup of organizations including reproductive health provider Planned Parenthood, gun-control group Moms Demand Action and Emily's List, which promotes female candidates for office, sent large contingents to the event.

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Women's marches around the world
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Women's marches around the world
LONDON, ENGLAND - JANUARY 21: a Protetester holds her placard outside The US Embassy in Grosvenor Square ahead of the Women's March on January 21, 2017 in London, England. The Women�s March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for women�s rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JANUARY 21: Protetester gather outside The US Embassy in Grosvenor Square ahead of the Women's March on January 21, 2017 in London, England. The Women�s March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for women�s rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
Protesters outside the American Embassy in London in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. (Photo by John Stillwell/PA Images via Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JANUARY 21: Protetester gather outside The US Embassy in Grosvenor Square ahead of the Women's March on January 21, 2017 in London, England. The Women�s March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for women�s rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - JANUARY 21: A Thai woman takes a photo of a 'hate is not great' sign at the women's solidarity gathering on January 21, 2017 in Bangkok, Thailand. The Womens March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for womens rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents. (Photo by Lauren DeCicca/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - JANUARY 21: American expats and travellers gather with the international community in Bangkok at the Roadhouse BBQ restaurant to stand in solidarity on January 21, 2017 in Bangkok, Thailand.The Womens March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for womens rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents.(Photo by Lauren DeCicca/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - JANUARY 21: A young Thai girl holds a 'women's rights are human rights' sign at Roadhouse BBQ restaurant where many of the Bangkok Womens March participants gathered on January 21, 2017 in Bangkok, Thailand. The Womens March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for womens rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents. (Photo by Lauren DeCicca/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - JANUARY 21: 'womens rights are human rights' signs line the walls of the Roadhouse BBQ, the site of a womens solidarity event on January 21, 2017 in Bangkok, Thailand. The Womens March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for womens rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents. (Photo by Lauren DeCicca/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - JANUARY 21: Women gather posters and signs to prepare to take the group photo of the womens solidarity group on January 21, 2017 in Bangkok, Thailand. The Womens March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for womens rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents. (Photo by Lauren DeCicca/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - JANUARY 21 : People hold banners as they gather for a rally, protesting US new President Donald Trump following his inauguration on January 21, 2017 in front of the Parliament House, in Melbourne, Australia on January 21, 2017. Rights groups, mostly includes women, marched in solidarity with Americans to speak out against misogyny, bigotry and hatred. (Photo by Recep Sakar/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
MACAU - JANUARY 21: Protesters hold placards as they take part at the Women's March rally on January 21, 2017 in Macau, Macau. The Women's March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for women's rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents (Photo by Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - JANUARY 21: Protesters take part in the Melbourne rally to protest against the Trump Inauguration on January 21, 2017 in Melbourne, Australia. The marches in Australia were organised to show solidarity with those marching on Washington DC and around the world in defense of women's rights and human rights. (Photo by Wayne Taylor/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - JANUARY 21: Protesters take part in the Melbourne rally to protest against the Trump Inauguration on January 21, 2017 in Melbourne, Australia. The marches in Australia were organised to show solidarity with those marching on Washington DC and around the world in defense of women's rights and human rights. (Photo by Wayne Taylor/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - JANUARY 21: Protesters take part in the Melbourne rally to protest against the Trump Inauguration on January 21, 2017 in Melbourne, Australia. The marches in Australia were organised to show solidarity with those marching on Washington DC and around the world in defense of women's rights and human rights. (Photo by Wayne Taylor/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - JANUARY 21: Protesters take part in the Melbourne rally to protest against the Trump Inauguration on January 21, 2017 in Melbourne, Australia. The marches in Australia were organised to show solidarity with those marching on Washington DC and around the world in defense of women's rights and human rights. (Photo by Wayne Taylor/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - JANUARY 21: Protesters take part in the Melbourne rally to protest against the Trump Inauguration on January 21, 2017 in Melbourne, Australia. The marches in Australia were organised to show solidarity with those marching on Washington DC and around the world in defense of women's rights and human rights. (Photo by Wayne Taylor/Getty Images)
Women protestors march in a rally against US President Donald Trump following his inauguration, in Sydney on January 21, 2017. A Women's March kicked off, the first of a series of global protests in defence of women's rights, as demonstrators rally against Donald Trump, who was sworn in as the 45th president of United States on Januray 20. / AFP / Andrew Murray (Photo credit should read ANDREW MURRAY/AFP/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - JANUARY 21: Women attend a protest for women's rights and freedom in solidarity with the Women's March on Washington in front of Brandenburger Tor on January 21, 2017 in Berlin, Germany. The Women's March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for Women's rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents. (Photo by Steffi Loos/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JANUARY 21: A protester wears a blanket with 'Love U, Trump Hate' during the Women's March on January 21, 2017 in London, England. The Women�s March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for women�s rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - JANUARY 21: Women and men attend a protest for women's rights and freedom in solidarity with the Women's March on Washington in front of Brandenburger Tor on January 21, 2017 in Berlin, Germany. The Women's March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for Women's rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents. (Photo by Steffi Loos/Getty Images)
A person holds a heart-shaped cardboard during a rally against US newly sworn-in President Donald Trump in Rome on January 21, 2017, a day after Trump's inauguration. Hundreds of thousands of protesters spearheaded by women's rights groups are set to converge on Washington to send a defiant message to America's new president, Donald Trump. Less than 24 hours after entering the White House, Trump will be faced with a show of force by demonstrators united by a common dread of what his presidency holds in store. / AFP / TIZIANA FABI (Photo credit should read TIZIANA FABI/AFP/Getty Images)
A person holds a sign during a rally against US newly sworn-in President Donald Trump in Rome on January 21, 2017, a day after Trump's inauguration. Hundreds of thousands of protesters spearheaded by women's rights groups are set to converge on Washington to send a defiant message to America's new president, Donald Trump. Less than 24 hours after entering the White House, Trump will be faced with a show of force by demonstrators united by a common dread of what his presidency holds in store. / AFP / TIZIANA FABI (Photo credit should read TIZIANA FABI/AFP/Getty Images)
People take part in the Women's March in front of the USA embassy in Accra on January 21, 2017. Protest rallies were held in over 30 countries around the world in solidarity with the Washington Women's March in defense of press freedom, women's and human rights following the official inauguration of Donald J Trump as the 45th President of the United States of America. / AFP / CRISTINA ALDEHUELA (Photo credit should read CRISTINA ALDEHUELA/AFP/Getty Images)
People take part in the Women's March in front of the USA embassy in Accra on January 21, 2017. Protest rallies were held in over 30 countries around the world in solidarity with the Washington Women's March in defense of press freedom, women's and human rights following the official inauguration of Donald J Trump as the 45th President of the United States of America. / AFP / CRISTINA ALDEHUELA (Photo credit should read CRISTINA ALDEHUELA/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JANUARY 21: Protesters make their way through the streets of London during the Women's March on January 21, 2017 in London, England. The Women�s March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for women�s rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
People take part in a rally in solidarity with supporters of the Women's March taking place in Washington and many other cities on January 21, 2017 in Prague, Czech Republic, one day after the inauguration of the US President. Protest rallies were held in over 30 countries around the world in solidarity with the Washington Women's March in defense of press freedom, women's and human rights following the official inauguration of Donald J Trump as the 45th President of the United States of America. / AFP / Michal CIZEK (Photo credit should read MICHAL CIZEK/AFP/Getty Images)
People take part in a rally in solidarity with supporters of the Women's March taking place in Washington and many other cities on January 21, 2017 in Prague, Czech Republic, one day after the inauguration of the US President. Protest rallies were held in over 30 countries around the world in solidarity with the Washington Women's March in defense of press freedom, women's and human rights following the official inauguration of Donald J Trump as the 45th President of the United States of America. / AFP / Michal CIZEK (Photo credit should read MICHAL CIZEK/AFP/Getty Images)
People take part in a rally in solidarity with supporters of the Women's March taking place in Washington and many other cities on January 21, 2017 in Prague, Czech Republic, one day after the inauguration of the US President. Protest rallies were held in over 30 countries around the world in solidarity with the Washington Women's March in defense of press freedom, women's and human rights following the official inauguration of Donald J Trump as the 45th President of the United States of America. / AFP / Michal CIZEK (Photo credit should read MICHAL CIZEK/AFP/Getty Images)
Protesters in front of the Pantheon in Rome, Italy during the Women's March on January 21, 2017. The Women's March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for women's rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents.
Protesters in London during a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. (Photo by John Stillwell/PA Images via Getty Images)
Protesters in London during a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. (Photo by Gareth Fuller/PA Images via Getty Images)
BARCELONA, SPAIN - JANUARY 21: Demonstrators make their way during the Women's March on January 21, 2017 in Barcelona, Spain. The Women's March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for women's rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents. (Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JANUARY 21: Protesters gather outside The US Embassy in Grosvenor Square ahead of the Women's March on January 21, 2017 in London, England. The Women's March originated in Washington DC but soon spread to be a global march calling on all concerned citizens to stand up for equality, diversity and inclusion and for Women's rights to be recognised around the world as human rights. Global marches are now being held, on the same day, across seven continents. (Photo by Jack Taylor/Getty Images)
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'PUSSYHAT' PARADE

Many participants wore knitted pink cat-eared "pussyhats," a reference to Trump's claim in the 2005 video that was made public weeks before the election that he grabbed women by the genitals.

The march spotlights the fierce opposition Trump faces as he takes office, a period that is typically more of a honeymoon for a new president.

A recent ABC News/Washington Post poll found Trump had the lowest favorability rating of any incoming president since the 1970s.

Women gave a host of reasons for marching, ranging from inspiring other women to run for office to protesting Trump's plans to repeal the 2010 Affordable Care Act, which among other things requires health insurers to cover birth control.

Jesse Carlock, 68, a psychologist from Dayton, Ohio was attending her first protest in decades.

"Once Mr. Trump was elected, I decided I needed to get active again, and I hadn't been since the 60s and 70s," Carlock said. "I've got to stand up and be counted as against a lot of what President Trump is saying...about healthcare, immigration, reproductive rights, you name it."

Women said they hoped to send a unity message to Trump after a campaign in which he said Mexican immigrants were "rapists," discussed banning Muslims from entering the United States, and was revealed to have once bragged about grabbing women by the genitals and kissing them without permission.

Trump's team did not respond to a request for comment about the march.

Celebrities such as the musicians Janelle Monae and Katy Perry - both of whom supported Clinton in the election - are expected to take part in Saturday's march.

The march organizers said they had extensive security plans in place, and would have both visible and hard-to-spot security workers along the route. (Additional reporting by Ian Simpson and and Ginger Gibson; Editing by Alistair Bell)

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