Super lit: Weed group distributes over 5,000 free joints for inauguration

Protesters are having high times at Donald Trump's inauguration thanks to the decriminalization of cannabis in the nation's capital and thousands of free marijuana cigarettes, or joints, which were passed out by pro-marijuana legalization group DCMJ.

The demonstration, recognized by the D.C. Cannabis Coalition as "#Trump420," was organized by the advocacy organization that helped to legalize marijuana in Washington D.C. in 2014.

And they have since shifted focus to the legalization of the drug in all 50 states.

Advocating on behalf of cannabis reform, the weed group has rolled and distributed over 5,000 joints thus far, which they lit 4 minutes and 20 seconds into Trump's inauguration, in hopes that the newly inducted president will embrace marijuana legalization.

RELATED: Marijuana legalization laws by state

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Marijuana legalization laws by state
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Marijuana legalization laws by state

Alabama: Medical use only, otherwise possession is a felony

(Photo: Dennis Macdonald via Getty Images)

Alaska: Marijuana legalized for medical and recreational use 

(Photo: Zoonar/N.Okhitin via Getty Images)

Arizona: Marijuana legalized for medical use

(Photo: Mikel Ortega via Getty Images)

Arkansas: Medical use only

(Photo: Getty Images)

California: Legal for medical and recreational use

(Getty)

Colorado: Legal for medical and recreational use  

(REUTERS/Rick Wilking)

Connecticut: Decriminalized and legalized for medical use 

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Delaware: Decriminalized

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Florida: Medical use only

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Georgia: Medical use only

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Hawaii: Medical use only

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Idaho: Not legal

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Illinois: Decriminalized

(Photo: VisionsofAmerica/Joe Sohm)

Indiana: Not legal

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Iowa: Medical use only

(Photo: Getty Images)

Kansas: Not legal

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Kentucky: Not legal

(Photo: Dorling Kindersley via Getty Images)

Louisiana: Medical use only

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Maine: Legal for medical and recreational use

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Maryland: Decriminalized

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Massachusetts: Legal

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Michigan: Medical use only

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Minnesota: Decriminalized

(Photo: Getty Images)

Mississippi: Decriminalized on first offense

(Photo: Getty Images)

Missouri: Not legal

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Montana: Medical use only

(Photo: Dennis Macdonald via Getty Images)

Nebraska: Decriminalized on first offense only

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Nevada: Legal

(Photo: Shutterstock)

New Hampshire: Medical use only

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New Jersey: Medical use only

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New Mexico: Medical use only

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New York: Decriminalized unless in public view

(REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton)

North Carolina: Decriminalized

(Photo: Getty Images)

North Dakota: Medical use only

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Ohio: Decriminalized

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Oklahoma: Medical use only

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Oregon: Legal for medical and recreational use

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Pennsylvania: Medical use only

(Photo: Henryk Sadura via Getty Images)

Rhode Island: Decriminalized

(Photo: Shutterstock)

South Carolina: Not legal

(Photo: Shutterstock)

South Dakota: Not legal

(Photo: Dave and Les Jacobs via Getty Images)

Tennessee: Medical use only

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Texas: Medical use only, decriminalized in Houston and Dallas

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Utah: Not legal 

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Vermont: Decriminalized

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Virginia: Not legal

(Photo: Shutterstock)

Washington: Legal for medical and recreational use

(Photo: Shutterstock)

West Virginia: Medical use only

(Photo: Getty Images)

Wisconsin: Medical use only

(Photo: Getty Images)

Wyoming: Not legal 

(Photo: Space Images via Getty Images)

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Leader of the group, Adam Eidinger, told NBC News that the group began planning the event after Trump announced Sen. Jeff Sessions as his pick for attorney general, who has been critical of marijuana use and outspoken in opposition against legalization efforts.

Trump has also held several positions on the issue, at one point stating he supported individual states deciding on the matter at a campaign rally in 2015.

"In terms of marijuana and legalization," Trump said. "I think that should be a state issue, state-by-state."

And he has since changed his view on legalization, citing that he believes recreational marijuana use is causing problems in Colorado during an interview with Bill O' Reilly in 2016.

SEE ALSO: Venezuelan president chased by pot-banging protester

Still, Eidinger remains hopeful that Trump will consider soften his position on legalization, and even each out to him.

"I'm hoping that Donald Trump will reach out to me personally and invite me up and the leaders of the major marijuana groups up to Trump Tower and have a green panel and ask us what we want to see happen," he said.

Either way, Eidinger will light up into Trump's inauguration with no hard feelings.

"We're going to watch his speech high," he said. "And I think that's a good thing."

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