The future looks very grim for more than half of our fellow primates

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The future is looking very grim for some of our fellow primates.

According to a new study, more than half of Earth's nonhuman primate species — including monkeys, lemurs and apes — are facing the threat of extinction.

And about three-quarters of primates have declining populations.

The shrinking numbers have researchers concerned. As one of the study's authors put it, "This truly is the eleventh hour for many of these creatures."

SEE MORE: Humans Could Hunt 301 Species Of Mammals Into Extinction

Habitat loss, the illegal pet trade, hunting and climate change are just some causes behind the decline. And those threats have one thing in common — humans.

An author of the study says unless conservation becomes a "global priority," many of the world's primate species will disappear in the next 25 years.

The researchers say Brazil, Indonesia, Madagascar and the Democratic Republic of the Congo currently host two-thirds of all primate species. They say conservation efforts in these areas could stop or even reverse the global primate extinction trend.

Related: Also learn more about the unusual Monkey Buffet Festival:

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The Monkey Buffet Festival in Thailand
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The Monkey Buffet Festival in Thailand
Monkeys cross a street before the Monkey Buffet Festival, in Lopburi province, north of Bangkok, Thailand November 27, 2016. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
Monkeys eat fruits and vegetables in a van during the Monkey Buffet Festival, near the Phra Prang Sam Yot temple in Lopburi province, north of Bangkok, Thailand November 27, 2016. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
Monkeys run across a street before the Monkey Buffet Festival, in Lopburi province, north of Bangkok, Thailand November 27, 2016. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
Monkeys eat fruits and vegetables during the Monkey Buffet Festival, near the Phra Prang Sam Yot temple in Lopburi province, north of Bangkok, Thailand November 27, 2016. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
A tourist take a selfie as a monkey climbs on his arm during the annual Monkey Buffet Festival at the Phra Prang Sam Yot temple in Lopburi province, north of Bangkok, Thailand November 27, 2016. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
Performers in monkey dresses dance during the annual Monkey Buffet Festival at the Phra Prang Sam Yot temple in Lopburi province, north of Bangkok, Thailand November 27, 2016. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
Long-tailed macaques are seen at the Pra Prang Sam Yot temple before the annual Monkey Buffet Festival in Lopburi, north of Bangkok November 29, 2015. The festival provides food and drinks to the local monkey population, which numbers more than 2,000, to thank them for drawing tourists to the town. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
A monkey drinks in front of the Phra Prang Sam Yot temple during the annual Monkey Buffet Festival in Lopburi province, north of Bangkok, Thailand November 27, 2016. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
A long-tailed macaque is seen at the Pra Prang Sam Yot temple before the annual Monkey Buffet Festival in Lopburi, north of Bangkok November 29, 2015. The festival provides food and drinks to the local monkey population, which numbers more than 2,000, to thank them for drawing tourists to the town. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Long-tailed macaques eat fruits from a plate held by festival organizer Yongyuth Kitwattananusorn during the annual Monkey Buffet Festival at the Pra Prang Sam Yot temple in Lopburi, north of Bangkok, Thailand November 29, 2015. The festival provides food and drinks to the local monkey population, which numbers more than 2,000, to thank them for drawing tourists to the town. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Long-tailed macaques eat fruits during the annual Monkey Buffet Festival in Lopburi, north of Bangkok November 29, 2015. The festival provides food and drinks to the local monkey population, which numbers more than 2,000, to thank them for drawing tourists to the town. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
Long-tailed macaques eat fruits from a plate held by festival organizer Yongyuth Kitwattananusorn during the annual Monkey Buffet Festival at the Pra Prang Sam Yot temple in Lopburi, north of Bangkok, Thailand November 29, 2015. The festival provides food and drinks to the local monkey population, which numbers more than 2,000, to thank them for drawing tourists to the town. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
A long-tailed macaque eats during the annual Monkey Buffet Festival at the Pra Prang Sam Yot temple in Lopburi, 150km (94 miles) north of Bangkok November 27, 2011. The festival provides food and drinks to the local monkey population, which numbers more than 2,000, to thank them for drawing tourists to the town. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (THAILAND - Tags: SOCIETY TRAVEL ANIMALS)
A long-tailed macaque eats food served during the annual Monkey Buffet Festival at the Pra Prang Sam Yot temple in Lopburi, north of Bangkok November 30, 2014. The festival provides food and drinks to the local monkey population, which numbers more than 2,000, to thank them for drawing tourists to the town. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (THAILAND - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS)
Long-tailed macaques drink and eat food offered during the annual Monkey Buffet Festival at the Pra Prang Sam Yot temple in Lopburi, 150km (94 miles) north of Bangkok November 27, 2011. The festival provides food and drinks to the local monkey population, which numbers more than 2,000, to thank them for drawing tourists to the town. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (THAILAND - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS TRAVEL)
A monkey nips a woman's hair at the Pra Prang Sam Yot temple during the Monkey Buffet Festival in Lopburi province, 150 km (94 miles) north of Bangkok, November 25, 2012. More than 4,000kg of fruits are used during the annual festival to promote tourism. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom (THAILAND - Tags: SOCIETY FOOD ANIMALS TRAVEL TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
A long-tailed macaque eats at the Pra Prang Sam Yot temple during the annual Monkey Buffet Festival in Lopburi, 150km (94 miles) north of Bangkok, November 28, 2010. The festival provides food and drinks to the local monkey population, which numbers more than 2,000, to thank them for drawing tourists to the town. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (THAILAND - Tags: ANIMALS FOOD TRAVEL)
Long-tailed macaques gather at the Pra Prang Sam Yot temple for the annual Monkey Buffet Festival in Lopburi, 150km (94 miles) north of Bangkok, November 28, 2010. The festival provides food and drinks to the local monkey population, which numbers more than 2,000, to thank them for drawing tourists to the town. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (THAILAND - Tags: ANIMALS FOOD TRAVEL SOCIETY)
Long-tailed macaque monkeys gather at the Pra Prang Sam Yot temple for the annual Monkey Buffet Festival in Lopburi, 150km (94 miles) north of Bangkok November 29, 2009. The festival provides various types of food and drink to the local monkey population, which numbers more than 2,000, thanking them for drawing tourists to the town. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (THAILAND SOCIETY TRAVEL ANIMALS)
Long-tailed macaques rest after eating at the Pra Prang Sam Yot temple during the annual Monkey Buffet Festival in Lopburi, 150km (94 miles) north of Bangkok, November 28, 2010. The festival provides food and drinks to the local monkey population, which numbers more than 2,000, to thank them for drawing tourists to the town. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (THAILAND - Tags: ANIMALS TRAVEL FOOD IMAGES OF THE DAY)
A long-tailed macaque monkey holds glasses stolen from a tourist during the annual Monkey Buffet Festival, in front of the Pra Prang Sam Yot temple in Lopburi, 150km (94 miles) north of Bangkok, November 29, 2009. The festival provides various types of food and drink to the local monkey population, which numbers more than 2,000, to thank them for drawing tourists to the town. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (THAILAND SOCIETY TRAVEL ANIMALS RELIGION IMAGES OF THE DAY)
Chefs prepare fruits and vegetables during the annual Monkey Buffet Festival in front of Pra Prang Sam Yot temple in Lopburi province, 150 km (94 miles) north of Bangkok, November 25, 2007.The annual festival provides various types of food and drink to the local monkey population, which numbers more than 2,000. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang (THAILAND)
A monkey grabs food at the Pra Prang Sam Yot temple during the Monkey Buffet Festival in Lopburi, about 150 km (92 miles) north of Bangkok November 27, 2005. The annual festival provides various types of food and drink to the local monkey population, which numbers more than 2,000.
Monkeys grab food on a table during the Monkey Buffet festival at the Pra Prang Sam Yot temple in Lopburi, about 150km (92 miles) north of Bangkok, November 27, 2005. The annual festival provides various types of food and drink to the local monkey population, which numbers more than 2,000. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang
A monkey drinks Coke during the Monkey Buffet festival at the Pra Prang Sam Yot temple in Lopburi, about 150km (92 miles) north of Bangkok, November 27, 2005. The annual festival provides various types of food and drink to the local monkey population, which numbers more than 2,000. REUTERS/Sukree Sukplang
A Monkey enjoys fruits and vegetables during the annual festival in front of ancient temple in Lopburi province 150 km (94 miles) north of Bangkok on November 28, 2004. More than 2,000 kg of fruit and vegetables were used during the festival to promote tourism. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom CS/LA
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