President Obama says he won't be running for office 'anytime soon'

President Barack Obama gave his final press conference as president of the United States on Wednesday, and one comment has some scratching their heads and others reaching for their Shepard Fairey posters.

"I'm not going to be running for anything anytime soon," Obama said while addressing a press question about how he plans to shape America after leaving the White House.

Social media was quickly abuzz with speculation regarding the prospects of Obama running for office again in the future. "So you're telling me there's a chance," one user tweeted regarding the president's "anytime soon" caveat.

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While the president has expressed relief at the prospect of never campaigning again and suggested that the chances of him running for office in the future are slim, there is precedent for former U.S. presidents to run for lesser-elected office after leaving the White House.

John Quincy Adams was elected to the House of Representatives after completing a term as president and Andrew Johnson won a seat in the U.S. Senate after serving as President.

William Taft never ran for elected office, but served on the Supreme Court as Chief Justice for nearly a decade after his presidency.

While Obama's chances of holding elected office again are likely slim, Obama is expected to stay at least somewhat involved in politics, especially since Hillary Clinton's loss has left the party without an obvious leader.

In terms of how active and vocal Obama will be in his post-presidential life, Obama hinted that he plans to pick his battles regarding when to make his voice heard. He urged Democrats to make sure to distinguish between the "normal back and forth" of politics and when "core values may be at stake."

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Obama said that if he saw "systematic discrimination being ratified," "functional obstacles for peopling being able to vote," "institutional efforts to silence decent and the press," or "efforts to round up kids who have grown up here, and for all practical purposes are Americans kids, and send them some place else," he would feel the need to speak out.

The president also talked about spending "precious time with my girls," as well as celebrating his 25th anniversary with his wife Michelle Obama.

He also expressed interest in taking some time to reflect on his time in office, not hear his own voice, and write. "It's important for me to take some time to process this amazing experience we have gone through," said Obama.

President-elect Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th president of the United States on Friday.

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