Trump accuses civil rights leader Lewis of lying about inauguration

WASHINGTON, Jan 17 (Reuters) - U.S. President-elect Donald Trump extended his war of words with African-American civil rights leader John Lewis on Tuesday, accusing the Democratic congressman of lying when he said Trump's inauguration would be the first that he would miss.

"John Lewis said about my inauguration, 'It will be the first one that I've missed.' WRONG (or lie)! He boycotted Bush 43 also because he 'thought it would be hypocritical to attend Bush's swearing-in....he doesn't believe Bush is the true elected president.' Sound familiar!" Trump said in a pair of posts on Twitter.

The Republican president-elect initially clashed with Lewis on Twitter over the weekend after the congressman from Georgia questioned the legitimacy of his Nov. 8 election victory, because of U.S. intelligence agencies' conclusion that Russia meddled in the campaign. Lewis also said he would not attend Trump's swearing-in this Friday and that "It will be the first one that I miss since I've been in the Congress."

Learn more about John Lewis:

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Rep. John Lewis
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Rep. John Lewis
U.S. Rep. John Lewis of Georgia, a civil-rights icon, who was lambasted over the weekend by President-elect Donald Trump after Lewis questioned the legitimacy of Trump's election, speaks at the 5000 Role Models of Excellence breakfast at Jungle Island on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Jan. 16, 2017 in Miami. (Emily Michot/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) appears in a pre-taped interview on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Friday, January 13, 2017. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) appears in a pre-taped interview on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Friday, January 13, 2017. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 11: Representative John Lewis (D-GA) takes part in panel testimony during the second day of the United States Attorney General confirmation hearing for Senator Jeff Sessions (R-AL) at the Russell Senate Office Building on Wednesday January 11, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) appears in a pre-taped interview on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Friday, January 13, 2017. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) appears in a pre-taped interview on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Friday, January 13, 2017. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 11: Representative John Lewis (D-GA), center, speaks as Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ), left, and Representative Cedric Richmond (D-LA) look on as they take part in panel testimony during the second day of the United States Attorney General confirmation hearing for Senator Jeff Sessions (R-AL) at the Russell Senate Office Building on Wednesday January 11, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Representative John Lewis, a Democrat from Georgia, speaks during a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing for Senator Jeff Sessions, a Republican from Alabama and attorney general nominee for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, not pictured, in Washington, D.C. U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017. Senator Cory Booker broke with tradition today and became the fist-sitting senator testify against a fellow senators nomination for a Cabinet post. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
PHILADELPHIA, PA - SEPTEMBER 19: Civil Rights icon Rep. John Lewis (GA-05) receives the the 2016 Liberty Medal from Jeffrey Rosen (left), President and CEO of the National Constitution Center Monday, September 19, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. According to the National Constitution Center, the Liberty Medal honors men and women of courage and conviction who strive to secure the blessings of liberty to people around the globe. (Photo by William Thomas Cain/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - SEPTEMBER 19: Civil Rights icon Rep. John Lewis (GA-05) receives the the 2016 Liberty Medal from Jeffrey Rosen (left), President and CEO of the National Constitution Center Monday, September 19, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. According to the National Constitution Center, the Liberty Medal honors men and women of courage and conviction who strive to secure the blessings of liberty to people around the globe. (Photo by William Thomas Cain/Getty Images)
Representative John Lewis, a Democrat from Georgia, from left, speaks while standing next to Representative Joseph 'Joe' Crowley, a Democrat from New York, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat from California, and Representative Charles 'Charlie' Rangel, a Democrat from New York, outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, June 23, 2016. Democrats closed out a marathon sit-in on the U.S. House floor Thursday afternoon after 25 hours of emotionally charged speeches demanding action on gun control, but they insisted their protests would continue in other forms. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 19: U.S. Representative John Lewis attends the Prayer Breakfast at the 45th Annual Legilative Black Caucus Foundation at Walter E. Washington Convention Center on September 19, 2015 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Earl Gibson III/Getty Images)
ATLANTA, GA - JUNE 19: United States Congressman John Lewis is honored before the game between the New York Mets and the Atlanta Braves at Turner Field on June 19, 2015 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Mike Zarrilli/Getty Images)
US Representative John Lewis, Democrat of Georgia and one of the original Selma marchers, speaks during an event marking the 50th Anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery civil rights marches at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, on March 7, 2015. US President Barack Obama rallied a new generation of Americans to the spirit of the civil rights struggle, warning their march for freedom 'is not yet finished.' In a forceful speech in Selma, Alabama on the 50th anniversary of the brutal repression of a peaceful protest, America's first black president denounced new attempts to restrict voting rights. AFP PHOTO/ SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
(L-R) Former First Lady Laura Bush, First Lady Michelle Obama, US President Barack Obama and US Representative John Lewis, Democrat of Georgia, holds hands during an event marking the 50th Anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery civil rights marches at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, March 7, 2015. US President Barack Obama rallied a new generation of Americans to the spirit of the civil rights struggle, warning their march for freedom 'is not yet finished.' In a forceful speech in Selma, Alabama on the 50th anniversary of the brutal repression of a peaceful protest, America's first black president denounced new attempts to restrict voting rights. AFP PHOTO/ SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
(L-R) US President Barack Obama holds hands with US Representative John Lewis, Democrat of Georgia, alongside former US President George W. Bush during an event marking the 50th Anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery civil rights marches at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, March 7, 2015. US President Barack Obama rallied a new generation of Americans to the spirit of the civil rights struggle, warning their march for freedom 'is not yet finished.' In a forceful speech in Selma, Alabama on the 50th anniversary of the brutal repression of a peaceful protest, America's first black president denounced new attempts to restrict voting rights. AFP PHOTO/ SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
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Lewis' remarks, in an interview with NBC's "Meet the Press," were released last Friday at the beginning of the long holiday weekend that honors slain black civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.

Trump responded on Saturday by tweeting that Lewis had falsely complained about the election results and instead "should spend more time on fixing and helping his district, which is in horrible shape and falling apart (not to mention crime infested)." Trump wrote dismissively that he was "all talk."

On Tuesday, Trump continued the battle, quoting an article in The Washington Post in 2001 that said Lewis spent Inauguration Day in his Atlanta district rather than see Republican President George W. Bush sworn in.

Bush was declared the winner of the 2000 presidential election after the Supreme Court halted a protracted recount of a close race in Florida against Democratic candidate Al Gore.

Trump's attacks on Lewis offended many Americans including some of Trump's fellow Republicans. Trump drew just 8 percent of the black vote in the November election.

The 76-year-old Lewis, who has been a civil rights leader for more than half a century, was beaten by police during a march he helped lead with King in 1965 in Selma, Alabama, drawing attention to hurdles for blacks to vote.

Related: Also see Trump meet with Martin Luther King III:

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Donald Trump meets with Martin Luther King III
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Donald Trump meets with Martin Luther King III

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump shakes hands with Martin Luther King III, an American human rights advocate, at Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York City, U.S., January 16, 2017.

(REUTERS/Alex Wroblewski)

Martin Luther King III, an American human rights advocate, speaks to the press after meeting with U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, at Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York City, U.S., January 16, 2017.

(REUTERS/Alex Wroblewski)

Martin Luther King III , an American human rights advocate, speaks to the press after meeting with U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, at Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York City, U.S., January 16, 2017.

(REUTERS/Alex Wroblewski)

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York City, U.S., January 16, 2017.

(REUTERS/Alex Wroblewski)

NEW YORK, NY - JANUARY 16: Martin Luther King III hugs Omarosa Manigault as he arrives at Trump Tower, January 16, 2017 in New York City. Trump will be inaugurated as the next U.S. President this coming Friday. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump with Martin Luther King III, an American human rights advocate, at Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York City, U.S., January 16, 2017.

(REUTERS/Alex Wroblewski)

Martin Luther King III (3rd from right) arrives at Trump Tower, January 16, 2017 in New York City. Trump will be inaugurated as the next U.S. President this coming Friday.

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Martin Luther King III gets on an elevator as he arrives at Trump Tower in New York City on January 16, 2017. The eldest son of American civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr. met with US President-elect Donald Trump on the national holiday observed in remembrance of his late father.

(DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)

Martin Luther King III (C), an American human rights advocate, meets with associates of the Trump administration in Manhattan, New York City, U.S., January 16, 2017.

(REUTERS/Alex Wroblewski)

Martin Luther King III speaks to reporters after his meeting with President-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower, January 16, 2017 in New York City. Trump will be inaugurated as the next U.S. President this coming Friday.

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

President-elect Donald Trump and Martin Luther King III stand after shaking hands after their meeting at Trump Tower, January 16, 2017 in New York City. Trump will be inaugurated as the next U.S. President this coming Friday.

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

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Lewis' office did not respond to a request for comment on Tuesday.

Maine's Republican governor, Paul LePage, chided Lewis on Tuesday in a radio interview, saying several Republican presidents had pursued civil reforms and Lewis should offer a simple word of thanks. LePage, who has referred to himself as a proto-Trump political figure, has been involved in controversies including making racially charged statements and using obscenities.

According to USA today, Rep. John Lewis' office confirmed the lawmaker did not attend the 2001 inauguration of George W. Bush.

AOL.com contributed to this report.

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