Over 80 dolphins found dead off Florida coast

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Over the weekend, 95 false killer whales were found stranded in South Florida in an area roughly 10 miles off Pavilion Key, reports the Miami Herald.

WFTV notes, "False killer whales are named for their resemblance to orcas. They are members of the dolphin family and range in size from 15 feet to 20 feet."

As of Monday, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 81 have been confirmed dead. 9 of them had to be euthanized due to health conditions deemed unfixable.

It is believed that just over a dozen more were stranded as well, but they have not been located, notes WBBH.

According to the Chicago Tribune, the cause of the event has yet to be determined, but rescue teams did face many challenges in the way of dense mangroves and sharks.

The Miami Herald notes that "...officials have closed the area around the key and are asking boaters and planes to steer clear as a dozen organizations, including the U.S. Coast Guard and Mote Marine Laboratory, assist in the search."

RELATED: Irrawaddy dolphins

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Irrawaddy dolphins
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Irrawaddy dolphins
An Irrawaddy dolphin is seen at Chilika Lagoon in the eastern Indian state of Orissa February 25, 2006. Hope is rising the endangered Irrawaddy dolphin can be saved in India after a survey showed more of the animals than before in a vast, brackish lagoon in the east of the country. Picture taken February 25, 2006. To match feature INDIA-DOLPHINS/. REUTERS/Dipani Sutaria/Handout (INDIA). EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS.
An Irrawaddy dolphin, also known as the Mekong dolphin, swims in the river at Kampi village in Kratie province, 230 km (143 miles) northeast of Cambodia, March 25, 2007. Cambodia's rare Mekong dolphin is making a tentative comeback from the edge of extinction after net fishing was banned in its main habitat, Cambodian and World Wildlife Fund officials said earlier this month. REUTERS/Chor Sokunthea (CAMBODIA) BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE
Photo Credit: EPA
Photo Credit: EPA
Photo Credit: EPA
An Irrawaddy dolphin, also known as the Mekong dolphin, swims in the river at the Kampi village in Kratie province, 230 km (143 miles) northeast of Cambodia, March 24, 2007 .Cambodia's rare Mekong dolphin is making a tentative comeback from the edge of extinction after net fishing was banned in its main habitat, Cambodian and World Wildlife Fund officials said earlier this month. REUTERS/Chor Sokunthea (CAMBODIA)
An Irrawaddy dolphin sports a cowboy hat while performing tricks at the Oasis Sea World marine park in Chantaburi Thailand. An Irrawaddy dolphin sports a cowboy hat while performing tricks at the Oasis Sea World marine park in Chantaburi, nearly 290 km (190 miles) southeast of Bangkok in this picture taken September 26, 2004. Conservationists say irrawaddy dolphins, along with lions and tigers, are among the most sought after items on the black market, with the demand for the species threatening their survival. Irrawaddy dolphins, among other wild animals and plants, will be a focus of the 13th Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) to be held in Bangkok starting October 2. Picture taken September 26, 2004. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
An Irrawaddy dolphin jumps through hoops at the Oasis Sea World marine park in Chantaburi, nearly 290 km (190 miles) southeast of Bangkok in this picture taken September 26, 2004. Conservationists say irrawaddy dolphins, along with lions and tigers, are among the most sought after items on the black market, with the demand for the species threatening their survival. Irrawaddy dolphins, among other wild animals and plants, will be a focus of the 13th Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) to be held in Bangkok starting October 2. Picture taken September 26, 2004. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom AL/SH
An Irrawaddy dolphin (R) performs with two pink dolphins at the Oasis Sea World marine park in Chantaburi, nearly 290 km (190 miles) southeast of Bangkok on December 20, 2003. The park was raided by Thai officials a day earlier, who were looking for evidence it had sold five pink dolphins to a Singapore water park using fake papers claiming the dolphins were bred in captivity. Pink dolphins, also known as Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins, are among the world's most endangered species. REUTERS/Adrees Latif AL
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