Marco Rubio, Elizabeth Warren weigh in on Trump-Lewis feud

The list of lawmakers wading into the dispute between President-elect Donald Trump and Rep. John Lewis continues to grow.

And it's even crossing the aisle. Florida Sen. Marco Rubio told reporters Monday he admires Lewis for his role in the civil rights movement.

But Rubio said he disagrees with Lewis' decision not to attend Trump's inauguration.

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U.S. Rep. John Lewis of Georgia, a civil-rights icon, who was lambasted over the weekend by President-elect Donald Trump after Lewis questioned the legitimacy of Trump's election, speaks at the 5000 Role Models of Excellence breakfast at Jungle Island on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Jan. 16, 2017 in Miami. (Emily Michot/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) appears in a pre-taped interview on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Friday, January 13, 2017. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) appears in a pre-taped interview on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Friday, January 13, 2017. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 11: Representative John Lewis (D-GA) takes part in panel testimony during the second day of the United States Attorney General confirmation hearing for Senator Jeff Sessions (R-AL) at the Russell Senate Office Building on Wednesday January 11, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) appears in a pre-taped interview on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Friday, January 13, 2017. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) appears in a pre-taped interview on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Friday, January 13, 2017. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 11: Representative John Lewis (D-GA), center, speaks as Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ), left, and Representative Cedric Richmond (D-LA) look on as they take part in panel testimony during the second day of the United States Attorney General confirmation hearing for Senator Jeff Sessions (R-AL) at the Russell Senate Office Building on Wednesday January 11, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Representative John Lewis, a Democrat from Georgia, speaks during a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing for Senator Jeff Sessions, a Republican from Alabama and attorney general nominee for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, not pictured, in Washington, D.C. U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017. Senator Cory Booker broke with tradition today and became the fist-sitting senator testify against a fellow senators nomination for a Cabinet post. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
PHILADELPHIA, PA - SEPTEMBER 19: Civil Rights icon Rep. John Lewis (GA-05) receives the the 2016 Liberty Medal from Jeffrey Rosen (left), President and CEO of the National Constitution Center Monday, September 19, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. According to the National Constitution Center, the Liberty Medal honors men and women of courage and conviction who strive to secure the blessings of liberty to people around the globe. (Photo by William Thomas Cain/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - SEPTEMBER 19: Civil Rights icon Rep. John Lewis (GA-05) receives the the 2016 Liberty Medal from Jeffrey Rosen (left), President and CEO of the National Constitution Center Monday, September 19, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. According to the National Constitution Center, the Liberty Medal honors men and women of courage and conviction who strive to secure the blessings of liberty to people around the globe. (Photo by William Thomas Cain/Getty Images)
Representative John Lewis, a Democrat from Georgia, from left, speaks while standing next to Representative Joseph 'Joe' Crowley, a Democrat from New York, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat from California, and Representative Charles 'Charlie' Rangel, a Democrat from New York, outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, June 23, 2016. Democrats closed out a marathon sit-in on the U.S. House floor Thursday afternoon after 25 hours of emotionally charged speeches demanding action on gun control, but they insisted their protests would continue in other forms. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 19: U.S. Representative John Lewis attends the Prayer Breakfast at the 45th Annual Legilative Black Caucus Foundation at Walter E. Washington Convention Center on September 19, 2015 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Earl Gibson III/Getty Images)
ATLANTA, GA - JUNE 19: United States Congressman John Lewis is honored before the game between the New York Mets and the Atlanta Braves at Turner Field on June 19, 2015 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Mike Zarrilli/Getty Images)
US Representative John Lewis, Democrat of Georgia and one of the original Selma marchers, speaks during an event marking the 50th Anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery civil rights marches at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, on March 7, 2015. US President Barack Obama rallied a new generation of Americans to the spirit of the civil rights struggle, warning their march for freedom 'is not yet finished.' In a forceful speech in Selma, Alabama on the 50th anniversary of the brutal repression of a peaceful protest, America's first black president denounced new attempts to restrict voting rights. AFP PHOTO/ SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
(L-R) Former First Lady Laura Bush, First Lady Michelle Obama, US President Barack Obama and US Representative John Lewis, Democrat of Georgia, holds hands during an event marking the 50th Anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery civil rights marches at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, March 7, 2015. US President Barack Obama rallied a new generation of Americans to the spirit of the civil rights struggle, warning their march for freedom 'is not yet finished.' In a forceful speech in Selma, Alabama on the 50th anniversary of the brutal repression of a peaceful protest, America's first black president denounced new attempts to restrict voting rights. AFP PHOTO/ SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
(L-R) US President Barack Obama holds hands with US Representative John Lewis, Democrat of Georgia, alongside former US President George W. Bush during an event marking the 50th Anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery civil rights marches at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, March 7, 2015. US President Barack Obama rallied a new generation of Americans to the spirit of the civil rights struggle, warning their march for freedom 'is not yet finished.' In a forceful speech in Selma, Alabama on the 50th anniversary of the brutal repression of a peaceful protest, America's first black president denounced new attempts to restrict voting rights. AFP PHOTO/ SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
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"I don't agree with him that President-elect Trump is illegitimate. ... I also had hoped that the president-elect would have responded differently given everything that John Lewis means to our country," Rubio told reporters.

In an interview for NBC's "Meet the Press" last week, Lewis had said he is boycotting Trump's inauguration.

"I don't see the president-elect as a legitimate president," Lewis said.

SEE MORE: Obama Administration Urges Donald Trump To 'Reach Out' To John Lewis

Trump responded on Twitter and said Lewis was "all talk, talk, talk — no action or results."

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren supports Lewis.

During Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Breakfast in Boston on Monday, she said multiple times Lewis has "earned the right" to question Trump's legitimacy as president. But she refused to say if she thinks Trump is legitimate.

She was quoted as saying, "What I believe is that right now, the intelligence community has raised significant questions about Russian interference in our electoral process. And that these questions must be tracked down, and that we both must determine exactly what Russia did, and take appropriate steps."

Trump will be sworn in as president on Friday.

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