Inauguration 2017: History's funniest, weirdest, and most important inauguration moments

On Friday, Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th president of the United States. It will mark the 58th inauguration ceremony in the nation's history.

Here are some of the most notable moments from the first 57 swearing-in ceremonies:

The funniest inauguration moments

Cowboy Doing a Trick with a LassoWhile the inauguration is mostly a sober affair symbolizing the peaceful transfer of power, the ceremonies have featured some moments of levity over the years. Botched oaths, Sasha Obama yawning during her father's speech, JFK's podium catching fire — these all had comedic value. But perhaps none match the surreal comedy of Texas-born Dwight D. Eisenhower being lassoed by a cowboy.

The weirdest inauguration moments

Like one of those weirdos you see walking down the street in shorts in the middle of January, William Henry Harrison famously chose not to wear a hat and coat during his 1841 wintry inauguration, which led to him catching pneumonia — which led to him dying after just a month in office.

Bill Clinton inexplicably had Elvis impersonators at his inauguration in 1993.

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Presidential inaugurations throughout America's history
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Presidential inaugurations throughout America's history
1788: The inauguration of George Washington as the first President of the United States, also present are (from left) Alexander Hamilton, Robert R Livingston, Roger Sherman, Mr Otis, Vice President John Adams, Baron Von Steuben and General Henry Knox. Original Artwork: Printed by Currier & Ives. (Photo by MPI/Getty Images)
United States President Thomas Jefferson tethers his horses to a post before attending his inauguration.
379933 07: A painting depicting the celebration of the Inauguration of President Andrew Jackson in 1829. Jackson was seventh President of the United States. (Photo by National Archive/Newsmakers)
The Inauguration of President Polk, 1845. James Knox Polk (1795-1849) was the eleventh President of the United States, serving from 1845 to 1849. From the Illustrated London News, 19 April 1845. (Photo by The Print Collector/Print Collector/Getty Images)
Abraham Lincoln's inaugural address - in front of the Washington State House of Representatives. March 1861. AB: Sixteenth President of the United States: 12 February 1809 Â 15 April 1865. Colourised version. (Photo by Culture Club/Getty Images)
Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln as president of the united states March 4, 1861 (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
The inauguration of James Buchanan as President, Washington, 1857. James Buchanan (1791-1868) was the fifteenth President of the United States, serving office between 1857 and 1861. He was the only President from Pennsylvania and the only President to never marry. From the Illustrated London News, 28 March 1857. (Photo by The Print Collector/Print Collector/Getty Images)
Abraham Lincoln delivering his second inaugural address as President of the United States, Washington, D.C. 1865. Photo shows President Lincoln standing in the centre of the photo (below the flag and to the left), on the east front of the U.S. Capitol. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
Ulysses S. Grant and Schuyler Colfax taking the oath of office administered by Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., March 4th 1869, before a large crowd. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty images)
President McKinley delivering his inaugural address in front of Cleveland. McKinley was the 25th President of the United States. He led the nation to victory in the SpanishÂAmerican War and raised protective tariffs to promote American industry. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: President Franklin D. Roosevelt waving to the crowd in front of the Capitol after making his second inaugural address. (Photo by NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
United States President Franklin Roosevelt delivering the inaugural address following his election to a fourth term, Washington, DC, 1944. (Photo by Afro American Newspapers/Gado/Getty Images)
Dwight Eisenhower is inaugurated as President of the United States. (Photo by © CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
379933 08: President John Fitzgerald Kennedy making his inaugural address as thirty-fifth president of the United States January 20, 1961. (Photo by National Archive/Newsmakers)
Kennedy delivers his inaugural address after being sworn in as the thirty-fifth President of the United States on January 20, 1961 in Washington DC. At the first row : US first lady Jacqueline Kennedy (2nd L), US former President Dwight D. Eisenhower (3rd L) and US Vice President Lyndon Johnson. (Photo credit should read SAM SCHULMAN/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: President Richard Nixon waves from car during inaugural parade. (Photo by John Duprey/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
Democrat Jimmy Carter is sworn in by chief justice Earl Burger as the 39th president of the United States while first lady Rosalynn looks on, Washington DC, January 20, 1977. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
US President Ronald Reagan (L) is sworn in as 40th President of the United States by Chief Justice Warren Burger (R) beside his wife Nancy Reagan (C) during inaugural ceremony, on January 20, 1981 at the Capitol in Washington, DC. At left is vice-president George W. Bush. (Photo credit should read /AFP/Getty Images)
Washington, DC. 1-20-1989 George H. W. Bush delivers his Inaugural speech from behind the bulletproof podium set up on the steps of the West Front of the US Captial. Bush was inaugurated on January 20, 1989, succeeding Ronald Reagan. He entered office at a period of change in the world; the fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of Soviet Union came early in his presidency. He ordered military operations in Panama and the Persian Gulf, and, at one point, was recorded as having a record-high a (Photo by Mark Reinstein/Corbis via Getty Images)
(Original Caption) Washington: President Bush makes his inaugural address at the Capitol after being sworn in as the 41st president of the United States.
President Clinton speaks outside the U.S. Capitol following his inauguration as the 42nd President of the United States. (Photo by © Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, : US President Bill Clinton (L) is sworn in 20 January 1997 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., for his second term as president of the United States by US Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist (R) as First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton (C) and daughter Chelsea (2nd-L) look on. At left rear is US Vice-President Al Gore and at right rear is his wife Tipper Gore. (Photo credit should read TIM CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: INAUGURATION--President George W. Bush delivers his inaugural address. (Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: George W. Bush is sworn in as the 43rd President of the United States by Chief Justice William Rehnquist on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol. (Photo By Douglas Graham/Roll Call/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - JANUARY 20: U.S. President Barack Obama (2nd L) walks with Former President George W. Bush (C) on the East Front as Bush departs from the U.S. Capitol after the inauguration of Barack Obama as the 44th president of the United States of America on January 20, 2009 in Washington, DC. Obama is the first African-American to be elected to the office of President in the history of the U.S. (Photo by Tannen Maury-Pool/Getty Images)
President Barack Obama takes the oath of office during the 57th Presidential Inauguration ceremonial swearing-in at the US Capitol on January 21, 2013 in Washington, DC. US Supreme Court Justice John Roberts (R) administered the oath. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 21: President Barack Obama waves to onlookers as the presidential inaugural parade winds through the nation's capital January 21, 2013 in Washington, DC. Barack Obama was re-elected for a second term as President of the United States. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
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And Andrew Jackson evidently hosted an inauguration day open house in 1829 that nearly destroyed the White House. In what sounds like a pretty damn awesome rager, revelers "drank heavily, destroyed furniture and china, and even ground cheese into the carpets with their boots." Jackson, who fought in both the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812, is said to have booked it out the back door, and the destructive party could only be saved by moving tubs of punch to the White House lawn to draw the drinkers outside.

Still, these examples will likely pale in comparison to the weirdness of seeing the dude from The Apprenticesworn in.

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Memorable quotes from presidential inaugural addresses
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Memorable quotes from presidential inaugural addresses

"And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you -- ask what you can do for your country." 

-President John F. Kennedy 

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

"Let it be said by our children's children that when we were tested we refused to let this journey end, that we did not turn back nor did we falter; and with eyes fixed on the horizon and God's grace upon us, we carried forth that great gift of freedom and delivered it safely to future generations."

-President Barack Obama

(REUTERS/Jason Reed)

"So, first of all, let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself."

-President Franklin D. Roosevelt

(Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

"The survival of liberty in our land increasingly depends on the success of liberty in other lands. The best hope for peace in our world is the expansion of freedom in all the world."

-President George W. Bush  

(Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images)

"We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature."

-President Abraham Lincoln

(Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)

"There is nothing wrong with America that cannot be cured by what is right with America."

-President Bill Clinton  

(Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

"We wish peace, but we wish the peace of justice, the peace of righteousness. We wish it because we think it is right and not because we are afraid."

-President Theodore Roosevelt 

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

"Justice requires us to remember: When any citizen denies his fellow, saying, "His color is not mine," or "His beliefs are strange and different," in that moment he betrays America, though his forebears created this nation."

-President Lyndon B. Johnson 

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

"The American dream does not come to those who fall asleep."

-President Richard M. Nixon 

(Photo by Henry Groskinsky/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)

"My fellow citizens, our Nation is poised for greatness. We must do what we know is right and do it with all our might. Let history say of us, "These were golden years—when the American Revolution was reborn, when freedom gained new life, when America reached for her best."

-President Ronald Reagan

(Photo credit should read /AFP/Getty Images)

"Since we ought to be no less persuaded that the propitious smiles of Heaven, can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right, which Heaven itself has ordained: And since the preservation of the sacred fire of liberty, and the destiny of the Republican model of Government, are justly considered as deeply, perhaps as finally staked, on the experiment entrusted to the hands of the American people."

-President George Washington

(Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty images)

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The most important inauguration moments

Some of the most important moments in American history have occurred during the presidential inauguration.

It was the venue in which Abraham Lincoln addressed slavery and called to "bind up the nation's wounds" against the backdrop of the Civil War. It was where John F. Kennedy urged Americans to "ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country" and where Franklin Delano Roosevelt declared that "the only thing we have to fear is fear itself." It is where our first black president called on a nation to "brave once more the icy currents, and endure what storms may come."

Donald Trump will be sworn in at 12 p.m. Eastern on Jan. 20.

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